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Education Outreach

Domestic ToxScholar Outreach Grants Reports

Domestic ToxScholar Outreach Grants Visit Summary

| 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 |

 2006

Applicant:
PANWAT
Campus Visited:
Whitman College
Walla Walla, WA
Affiliation:
Environmental & Molecular Toxicology
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR
Date of Visit:
2/1/2006
Amount Funded:
$ 0
Visitor(s):
Castle Funatake,
Nancy Kerkvliet
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
Handful

Target Audience:
Undergraduate Science Students at a Small Liberal Arts College

Presentation Format:
Informal Discussion

Report:
Published in Winter Issue 2006 of the Communiqué On–Line

Increasing awareness of toxicology among undergraduates is an important step in attracting future graduate students to toxicology programs across the country. Were it not for my own interactions with a graduate of the Environmental and Molecular Toxicology department at Oregon State University, I might still be sitting around trying to figure out what I want to do when I grow up. But, attracting new graduate students is just one of the many advantages of talking with students at college campuses. It may very well be the first time that these students will have heard about toxicology, so this gives us the opportunity to educate future scientists, lawyers, physicians, politicians, and others about the principles of toxicology so that they can make educated choices not only in their daily lives, but also when it comes time to vote on toxicological issues that have the potential to affect many people.

So, when Larry Curtis (Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon) approached me earlier this fall with the opportunity to return to my alma mater of Whitman College (Walla Walla, Washington) and speak to the students there about toxicology, I eagerly accepted his invitation. He explained to me that this was to be the pilot visit of a new program under the auspices of the Education Committee of the Society of Toxicology, and that the goal was to make undergraduates aware of toxicology as a possible career path. Because Whitman is a small college (around 1500 students currently attend Whitman) with only an undergraduate program that is focused on providing students with a solid foundation in the basic sciences, it was an ideal place to pilot the Toxicology Scholar Campus Visits program.

To begin, I made contact with my undergraduate advisor, Paul Yancey, and the Chair of the Biology Department at Whitman, Dan Vernon, and asked if I could come and talk with the current students about what I had done since graduating from Whitman. They welcomed the chance to have an alumna come back and tell her story so we scheduled the trip for early November. In hindsight, I should have asked specifically about the date of the seminar because as it turned out many of the students and faculty were leaving for a conference that day and many other students were preparing for the GRE that weekend. In the end, only a handful of students and faculty attended. On the positive side, we met in a classroom with long tables and chairs (not desks), rather than having it in a large auditorium or lecture hall, making the overall environment much less formal. I spoke to the students about toxicology in general and then moved into my own research. Afterward, the students asked both research–related and more general questions. They wanted to know how I had chosen a laboratory for my graduate studies, why I chose Oregon State University, if I was happy that I had taken some time off from school before starting graduate school.

My graduate advisor, Nancy Kerkvliet came with me and answered additional questions about the program at Oregon State University and about toxicology as a career. I think it was also a good opportunity for the students to see the relationship between a graduate student and advisor, which can be much more peer–like than the relationship between undergraduate students and professors. So, for those of you planning other campus visits, it is a rewarding opportunity to encourage students to consider a career in toxicology, but be sure to check the schedule for other activities (like conferences and exams), especially at small colleges and universities, and think about the style of the room the less formal, the better.


Applicant:
Harry Milman
Campus Visited:
Allegheny College
Meadville, PA
Affiliation:
Molecular Neuropsychiatry
Rockville, MD
Date of Visit:
4/12/2006
Amount Funded:
$ 350
Visitor(s):
Devon L. Graham
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
20, 25

Target Audience:
Students at a Small Liberal Arts College

Presentation Format:
Research Seminar and a Course Presentation

Report:
While on campus, I presented a research seminar based on my Ph.D. thesis work that was hosted by the biology department, the neuroscience program and Tri–Beta, the biology honor society. I also gave a brief presentation afterwards on toxicology graduate programs. There were about 20 students and faculty present. I also presented another talk the following day during the toxicology course that Allegheny offers. This consisted of a brief explanation of my research, followed by more details of graduate programs and career opportunities in toxicology. I focused on the University of Maryland’s graduate program but noted that it follows a structure similar to that of many other toxicology programs. There were about 25 students present.


Applicant:
Maureen Gwinn
Campus Visited:
West Virginia University
Morgantown, WV
Affiliation:
AE–SOT (RC)
Date of Visit:
4/19/2006
Amount Funded:
$ 500
Visitor(s):
Melanie S. Flint, Adam Straub, Maureen Gwinn
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
1

Target Audience:
Students from various West Virginia University departments as well as local universities (Bethany College, Washington & Jefferson University, West Virginia Wesleyan University, Fairmont State University)

Presentation Format:
Panel Discussion

Report:
The first Toxicology Scholar Visit for the AE–SOT took place on a Wednesday night on April 19, 2006 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM at West Virginia University (WVU). Advertising was done primarily through email and on-line contacts at the various WVU departments as well as local universities (Bethany College, Washington & Jefferson University, West Virginia Wesleyan University, Fairmont State University). For the panel of speakers we had in attendance, eight were AE–SOT members that included the President-Elect, President, Past President, Awards Councilor, Communication Councilor and both the former and current Student Representatives. The turnout was low, unfortunately, but the discussion was very good. Questions and comments focused on not only describing what toxicology is, but also how it fits in with already formed plans following graduation. Also, the best way to find a toxicology program was discussed. Given the variety of people at the meeting representing toxicology, we were able to give a very broad view of how people get involved in toxicology at all stages of their career. We have already received positive feedback from the student in attendance, and she is interested in learning more about the work we do and how to get involved either through volunteering or working in a student program.


Applicant:
Maureen Gwinn
Campus Visited:
Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, PA
Affiliation:
US EPA
Washington, DC

Date of Visit:
10/6/2006

Amount Funded:
$ 500

Visitor(s):
Melanie Flint, Adam Straub,
Pallavi Limaye
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
3–4

Target Audience:
The meeting is targeted to students at the local universities who are entertaining a future in science. We hope the audience will include graduate and undergraduate students.

Presentation Format:
The format for this visit will be to have a panel of speakers give a short statement on their background and how/why they came to be working in Toxicology. The panel will then ask and receive questions from the audience. The meeting will be conducted informally in the hope of starting a dialogue with interested students. We will also have current graduate students and postdoctoral fellows display past posters for discussion of current research. Breakfast and parking will be provided. We would also like to encourage attendance at our Fall meeting (to follow) so would like to cover the expense of registration for all interested students.

Report:
The second Toxicology Scholar Visit for the AE–SOT took place on Friday October 6 from 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM in conjunction with our annual Fall meeting. Advertising was done primarily through email and on-line contacts at the various WVU departments as well as local universities. For the morning session before our Fall meeting, we had only 3–4 students in attendance. They were able to ask about our research and view 6 posters put on display by current AE–SOT postdoctoral fellows and graduate students. We also had invited all students to attend the Fall meeting, for which we had a much better turnout. We had eleven students that attended the Fall meeting, during which they were able to learn more about careers in Toxicology as well as how to become more involved with AE–SOT. We have accepted membership forms from all students present, as we have previously set the first year as free membership for all students.

As a whole, it seems the best way to reach students is through free attendance at the annual meetings. We also discussed with some postdoctoral fellows present the idea of having them go back to their undergraduate universities to promote toxicology. There was some interest in that, and we hope to send a few fellows to local career fairs as well.

 

 2007

Applicant:
Peter Goering
Campus Visited:
Bethel College
North Newton, KA
Affiliation:
FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health
Silver Spring, MD

Date of Visit:
2/2/2007

Amount Funded:
$ 0

Visitor(s): Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Broad Audience at Bethel College Convocation

Presentation Format:
Presentation at Convocation

Report:
I wanted to let you know that I had a successful venture to Bethel College, my undergrad alma mater, on sort of a SOT ToxScholar visit, on Friday, Feb 2. I melded a presentation between some of the SOT slides (What is Toxicology?), and some of my “What Is US FDA?” slides, and ended with some of the “Careers in Tox” slides from the SOT set (job outlook, where do they work, SOT contact page, etc.). I also worked in a few of my research data slides.

The presentation was challenging because the college asked me to speak at one of the twice–a–week Convocation, when the entire student body and faculty come together to hear presentations on any variety of topics, due to no time in class schedule on Fridays for all of the science majors to meet. So I prepared for a broad audience. I think the everyday impact of toxicology and the US FDA really made an impression on all (well, at least most of them). Several students approached me afterwards for the SOT brochure where I told them they could find information on summer internships and academic programs. And I left the remaining brochures with the science department. The feedback I received from the college was very positive, in part, since I had geared the presentation to all, not just science majors.

The chair of the biology dept had sent students to Univ. of Kansas tox program for summer internships in the 1990’s, and so I think I re–vitalized that connection for them. And today Curt Klaassen at KUMC sent a link for his department’s summer student program.

I also spoke a similar presentation at the NCAC–SOT Regional Chapter “student day” symposium, which featured speakers from various sectors of employment. That seems like a successful day for that group. Perhaps the student reps from NCAC–SOT will share a written summary for the newsletter.

Thanks for your input and sending the brochures for distribution at the college. I think this is a good idea that SOT had initiated. I am not sure that I have any tips for improvement, but I will pass on as I think about it more.


Applicant:
Larry Curtis
Campus Visited:
University of South Alabama
Mobile, AL
Affiliation:
Associate Dean, College of Agricultural Sciences
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR

Date of Visit:
2/15/2007

Amount Funded:
$ 0

Visitor(s): Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
45 Undergraduates, M.Sc. Students, Graduates, and Faculty

Target Audience:
Undergraduates, M.Sc Students, Graduate, Faculty

Presentation Format:
Seminar; Careers in Toxicology

Report:
Most important outcomes of the visit was the support discipline of toxicology within a diverse group of biologists


Applicant:
Christopher Toscano
Campus Visited:
Manhattan College
Riverdale, NY
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD
Date of Visit:
2/16/2007
Amount Funded:
$ 0
Visitor(s): Christopher Toscano Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
60

Target Audience:
Undergraduates from College of Mount Saint Vincent, Manhattan College in the Bronx

Presentation Format:
Seminar

Report:
As planned I presented a seminar at the College of Mount Saint Vincent (CMSV) in Riverdale, NY on Friday February 16, 2007. The seminar was PowerPoint based and entitled “A Chemical Romance: Toxicology and the Human–Chemical Coexistence.” The seminar was undergraduate level and contained some material from the presentation on your Web site and some material I added (description of my research, etc).

While the seminar was given at CMSV, the audience contained biology students from both Manhattan College (my alma mater) in The Bronx and CMSV. The reason for this arrangement was due to the fact that the Biology department is a combined effort etween CMSV and Manhattan College. Importantly, neither college has a undergraduate or graduate program in toxicology. The final attendance for the seminar was approx. 60 people (10 faculty, 10 freshman biology students and 40 senior level biology students).

I focused on the importance of toxicology (what it is and why we need it), principles of toxicology (risk, dose and the toxicological paradigm), careers in toxicology (types of toxicology, employers and the findings of the Triennial Tox Salary Survey), and I finished with some description of my research in toxicology over the past 10 years. I also provided the attendants with copies of the brochures you sent me.

I really enjoyed this opportunity to go back to my alma mater and describe to students at a pivotal point in their education about the career opportunities in toxicology. I really feel that every member of SOT should seriously consider getting involved in this excellent program.

Thanks for all of your help. If you have any further questions or if you are looking for a toxicologist to give a presentation to another school in the Maryland or NYC area, please do not hesitate to contact me. I would be very happy to get involved with another Toxicology Scholar Campus Visit.


Applicant:
Kelsey Prihoda
Campus Visited:
Simpson College
Indianola, IA
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology / Interdepartmental Toxicology Program
Iowa State University
Ames, IA
Date of Visit:
3/22/2007
Amount Funded:
$ 53.88
Visitor(s):
Kelsey Prihoda, Lindsey Gereszek, James Delgado
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
The target audience for this visit is any student attending the Simpson College Career and Graduate School Fair. However, the Toxicology Graduate Student Organization (TGSO) is specifically interested in attracting juniors and seniors who have an interest in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and/or environmental science (all are majors at Simpson College) and who haven’t been exposed to the field of toxicology and its opportunities.

Presentation Format:
Booth at Simpson College Career and Graduate School Fair

Report:
Simpson College is a private liberal arts college in Indianola, IA with a student body of approximately 2,000. There are 39 majors offered, including several majors that would provide an excellent background for a graduate degree in toxicology (e.g. biology, chemistry, and biochemistry). The Simpson College Career and Graduate School Fair was held on Thursday, March 22, 2007. Companies that attended included everything from a Casey’s General Convenient Store to Pioneer (an agrochemicals company). There was also a diverse range of graduate programs, ranging from dentistry to social work. Lindsey Gereszek and I attended this event as representatives of the Interdepartmental Toxicology Program at Iowa State University (ISU). As active members of the program’s Toxicology Graduate Student Organization (TGSO), we have taken part in several various recruiting events in the past, and we were hopeful that we would make an impact on undergraduate students interested in a career in toxicology.

It became obvious soon after the fair opened that the majority of the students at Simpson College were not familiar with the field of toxicology. We received several puzzled looks from students passing by our booth, and eventually a few students began to ask us questions. In general, the students wanted to know what toxicology was, what educational background was necessary for a degree or career in toxicology, and what types of jobs were available to toxicologists. The brochures provided by SOT were an excellent resource for the students, and they provided literature to go along with what Lindsey and I were discussing with them. We also received several unexpected questions. For example, one student asked us to give our opinion on the best “detoxification diet” for removing toxins from the body. I believe we saved her a great deal of money by explaining that our bodies do a pretty good job of removing waste products by themselves, with no special diet needed.

While none of the students who stopped by our booth applied to the Interdepartmental Toxicology Program at ISU on the spot, all of the students who talked with us were opened up to a whole new world of graduate school and career opportunities that they weren’t aware of. We were able to introduce many students to the exciting and diverse field of toxicology by attending this event, which was a very rewarding experience. Perhaps we were even able to light the way to a future career in toxicology for some of the students by showing them where their degrees in biology and chemistry can take them. Lindsey and I agree that this was a wonderful way to promote toxicology to a large audience. We strongly recommended to the other members of TGSO to continue to participate in local and regional graduate school fairs, not only as a way to recruit potential students but as a venue to teach students about a subject that is rarely taught at the high school or undergraduate level—toxicology.


Applicant:
Kelly Hogan
Campus Visited:
San Diego State University
San Diego, CA
Affiliation:
Integrative Biosciences Graduate Program Option in Molecular Toxicology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, PA

Date of Visit:
4/16/2007

Amount Funded:
$ 258.18

Visitor(s):
Kelly Hogan
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
120

Target Audience:
The target audience will consist mainly of undergraduate majors in public health, biology, and chemistry.

Presentation Format:
One of two approaches will be taken with the goal of reaching the greatest number of students: 1) my host and I will work with career advisors and individual faculty to integrate my presentation into scheduled classes; or 2) we will provide an afternoon special session with refreshments for students who choose to attend. My presentation will focus on defining the discipline, discussing career options, and advising students about the graduate admissions process, choosing the right program, and succeeding once matriculated. Ample time will be permitted for students’ questions.

Report:
The annual meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research in Los Angeles presented me with an opportunity to visit two Southern California campuses as a Toxicology Scholar. The accessibility of San Diego from LA by train was incentive to choose San Diego State University (SDSU) as my first destination. I began by identifying my host, Dr. Ann de Peyster, Interim Director of the Graduate School of Public Health and Toxicology Program director, who kindly arranged two opportunities for me to speak to a diverse audience of undergraduate students, first in an introductory public health course and then in a 200–level health professions course. Approximately 50 students were enrolled in each course.

My presentations were largely public service announcements on behalf of the Society of Toxicology describing to students our discipline and the range of roles within which the toxicologist serves science. I focused, in particular, on how toxicologists contribute to the basic and biomedical sciences to improve public health. To illustrate the interrelationship between toxicology and public health, I called upon some of our great narratives in toxicology: Percival Pott’s role in identifying scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps as an early example of occupational carcinogenesis; the saga of DES daughters and the discovery of transgenerational carcinogenesis; thalidomide and the genesis of reproductive toxicity testing. My narratives were also global in scope: the contentious and ongoing inquiry into TCDD exposure during the Vietnam era and whether birth defects in this part of the world can be attributed to this toxicant. Dioxin also provided me with an important illustration of the “toxicant as tool” principle to elucidate disease processes. My personal favorite—the serendipitous discovery of the by–product MPTP after an unfortunate kitchen–synthesis of meperidine—helped students understand fundamentally how toxicants become tools for recapitulating disease processes in the lab. In addition to describing the toxicologist’s role as a research scientist, a portion of my talk was devoted to risk assessment and regulatory toxicology. By way of describing various career paths taken by toxicologists, I discussed our roles in regulating drugs and chemicals in both the private and public sector. This message meshed well with students—many of whom had expressed a commitment to careers in public health.

Both course instructors were very amenable to making time for these guest presentations on the subject of toxicology. One instructor had just covered the subject of substance abuse in her course, but noted that the subject of toxicology per se had not yet received much direct coverage in her course. The other instructor was a pharmacist; yet he, too, admitted that the subject of toxicology had not been covered in his health professions course, and he was equally generous with time allowed for my presentation. In other words, fitting a little dose of toxicology into both of these classes and relating information to existing course content was relatively effortless: The instructors just had not thought to do this.

During the planning phase of my visit to SDSU, Dr. de Peyster put me in contact with the Biological Sciences Student Association (BSSA) at University of California at San Diego (UCSD), which was hosting a life science career exposition the day I would travel to the San Diego area. The campus, located within striking distance of San Diego in La Jolla, provided another opportunity to interface with students who were considering graduate school in the biomedical sciences. Arrangements were made through numerous contacts with Alice Tsai, a senior science major and student organizer of the event. The career exposition encompassed representatives from a range of disciplines and career possibilities within the biological sciences. A handful of students attended my talk at UCSD, which focused primarily on graduate education in toxicology. Whereas my audiences at SDSU were made up of first– and second–year undergraduate students new to majors in public health, students at UCSD were juniors and seniors majoring in molecular level sciences who had completed basic coursework in biology, chemistry, calculus, and physics, and who were best positioned to pursue graduate work in toxicology. My goal at UCSD, therefore, was to inform students about the toxicologist’s role in research, discuss career options, and encourage these potential applicants to programs in biochemistry, neuroscience, and molecular biology to consider a graduate degree in toxicology as a viable option. I accomplished this again by calling on the dioxin narrative, using the elusive aryl hydrocarbon receptor to illustrate the many ways toxicological research potentially contributes to our understanding of unanswered questions in biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology.

In contrast to my captive audience at SDSU consisting exclusively of students required to attend class, attracting a sizable audience at UCSD was challenging. Six self–selected students attended my session, which organizers at UCSD entitled “Graduate Toxicology Program.” A more effective title reflecting instead the viability of toxicology as an alternative path for majors in the biological sciences may have assuaged more students to attend. Those in attendance, however, responded enthusiastically to tailored slides that, for example, listed the many majors at UCSD that would theoretically prepare students to succeed in a graduate program in toxicology.

By visiting two neighboring universities, I was able to reach a maximum number of students who are now not only informed about what toxicology is, but about educational and career opportunities for those who enter the field. I would encourage other advanced graduate students who are attending conferences in major cities, in particular, to set aside time to visit a campus. The experience serves many purposes: the Toxicology Scholar program not only affords an opportunity to interact with undergraduates, some of whom may pursue toxicology; it also creates an opportunity to forge relationships with toxicology faculty at other universities and explore programs, campuses, and future professional opportunities.


Applicant:
Palma Ann Marone
Campus Visited:
Villanova University
Villanova, PA
Affiliation:
Director, Toxicology Product Safety Laboratories
Dayton, NJ

Date of Visit:
4/25/2007

Amount Funded:
$ 0

Visitor(s):
Palma Ann Marone
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
15 undergraduates, local business reps

Target Audience:
The students are largely undergraduates, however, some graduate students may be in attendence.

Presentation Format:
I will speak with the students at a formal presentation meeting (slide show with question and answer session) on the field of toxicology. (I am an alumna of Villanova).

Report:
The most important outcomes of the visit were that it was informative for students and had a concentration of local businesses doing this work


Applicant:
Annabelle Javier
Campus Visited:
Allegheny–Erie Spring RC Meeting
Pittsburgh Athletic Association
Pittsburgh, PA
Affiliation:
ChemRisk
Pittsburgh, PA

Date of Visit:
5/11/2007

Amount Funded:
$ 117.06

Visitor(s):
Melanie Flint, Adam Straub, Maureen Gwinn
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
1 undergraduate

Target Audience:
The meeting is targeted to students at the local universities who are entertaining a future in science. We hope the audience will include graduate and undergraduate students.

Presentation Format:
The format for this outreach will be to encourage students to attend and participate in our annual Spring meeting. The format of the meeting is generally a poster display session from area graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in toxicology, as well as career scientists in the field.

Report:
The third Toxicology Scholar Visit for the AE–SOT took place on Friday, May 11 in conjunction with our annual Spring meeting. Advertising was done primarily through e–mail and on-line contacts at the various University of Pittsburgh departments as well as other local universities. Due to poor attendance at our Fall 2006 morning session for students and the improved student attendance at our subsequent afternoon meeting, we opted to forgo a morning session prior to our spring meeting. Instead, we offered students free registration to the lunch and afternoon meeting.

We had five students (including three postdoctoral fellows and two students), two University of Pittsburgh faculty, one Carnegie Mellon University faculty, and nine researchers from NIOSH that attended the Spring meeting. Industry was also well–represented by attendees from several consulting firms, as well as drug and chemical companies and CROs. Students were able to learn more about careers in toxicology as well as how to become more involved with AE–SOT. In addition, the students were able to view 10 posters on display by current AE–SOT researchers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. During the poster session, people were able to ask authors questions about the work presented. The meeting topic was Risk and Exposure Assessment, and we had two excellent speakers, Dr. Cliff Davidson and Dr. Michael Dourson. Dr. Davidson talked about air quality in western Pennsylvania, based on the results of the Pittsburgh Supersite Program. Dr. Dourson’s talk provided some real–life examples of instances in which laboratory data have been used to refine human health risk assessments.

As a whole, it seems the best way to reach students is through free attendance at the annual meetings. We are still struggling, however, with relatively low undergraduate attendance at our meetings, despite having put together a substantial e–mail database of local college faculty and departmental contacts. It is possible that because we held the meeting so late in the academic year, we had a lower number of undergraduates still in town. We also discussed with some postdoctoral fellows present the idea of having them go back to their undergraduate universities to promote toxicology. There was some interest in that, and we hope to send a few fellows to local career fairs as well.


Applicant:
Blair U. Bradford

Campus Visited:
Guilford College, Greensboro, NC

Affiliation:
Research Specialist, Dept of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, Torrence, CA

Date of Visit:
10/24/2007

Amount Funded:
$49.47

Visitor(s):
Blair U. Bradford

Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
15 UG Students

Target Audience:
Forensic biology and biology majors.

Presentation Format:
Guilford College is a small liberal arts, Quaker founded 4 year college. The college does not offer a program in Toxicology, thus I propose to first introduce the discipline using many of the slides available from the Web site. I will also make available SOT career brochures. I plan to give a seminar which will provide an overview of how chronic exposure to alcohol damages the liver. I will also review what is known about genetic variation in susceptibility to alcohol induced liver injury.

How were students recruited for the event?
Enlisted the help of Dr. Keegan, who contacted the Forensic Biology Club president and made preparations for a meeting which was advertised on campus through the local on line campus newsletter and pin-up flyers in the science building for the discussion.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Following the announcement from the Education Committee in the spring, I contacted a former professor and mentor at my alma mater, Guilford College, to see if he thought this program would benefit his students. Dr. Keegan is the director of the Forensic Biology program. He replied that he felt that there were a number of students who would be interested in hearing about careers in toxicology and he thought that it would be great if I could also give a seminar on my research.

Description of the first talk or event:
Discussion about Careers in Toxicology. Presented the slides provided by the Education committee and then spent about 45 minutes talking one on one with several students.
# Attending: 15 UG Students

Description of additional talks or events:
75 minute seminar to the Molecular Cell Biology Class followed by question & answer session. Talked about research in the field of alcohol metabolism and alcohol induced liver injury and work as an expert witness
# Attending: 45 Student; 2 Professors

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Students were asking many questions. Most of who had no idea how broad the field of toxicology could be and they had never thought of it before as a course of study.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: None mentioned

Materials used in the visit:  Slides, brochures


Applicant:
Michael Madden

Campus Visited:
Ashland University,
Ashland, OH

Affiliation:
US EPA,
Chapel Hill, NC

Date of Visit:
10/31/2007

Amount Funded:
$364.49

Visitor(s):
Michael Madden
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Primarily undergraduate students, in toxicology, biology, & environmental sciences (approximately 125 general biological science students). Ashland University is a mid-sized regional teaching university with approximately 2600 full time undergraduate and 1500 full time graduate students. Though one of the few academic institutions to offer an undergraduate degree, no graduate degrees in Toxicology are offered.

As an aside, I had lectured and met with interested students at Ashland University (not through an SOT-sponsored program) in 1997 to present a view of a what role a research toxicologist performs as well as to answer their questions (as best possible) about careers in toxicology and the toxicology programs in the Research Triangle Park (NC) area. I know several students applied to, and some accepted to, toxicology programs in the RTP area after my visit.  I would like a similar opportunity again 10 years later to revisit the same institution.

Presentation Format:
Day 1: early morning flight to Cleveland; drive rental car to Ashland
Informal lunch with interested students
Formal seminar (tentative title “Toxicologist for Hire: Experiences in Academia, Federal Government, and Consulting”)
Dinner with interested faculty and/or students

Day 2: drive rental car to Cleveland; early/mid morning flight to Raleigh/Durham Airport
Applicant:
Pat Shaw

Campus Visited:
Miami University of Ohio,
Oxford, OH

Affiliation:
Michigan State University, Woodbine, MD

Date of Visit:
10/31/2007

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Patrick Shaw Robert Roth
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
The visit would be scheduled for a Thursday. I would give an informal presentation, 45–60 minutes which would be aimed at undergraduates to inform them about the field of toxicology. Dr. Sarquis has informed that the department would place numerous flyers for all of the science departments and would have sponsorship for the presentation by the career development organization on campus. The presentation would consist of three parts. For the first 20 minutes I would provide an overview of what toxicology is and introduce the society of toxicology. I would describe career opportunities in the field and the various fields of toxicology. The second part would focus on graduate training in toxicology for ~20 minutes. I will briefly overview what graduate training in the field consists of and what graduate school life is really like. I think this will really be beneficial to undergraduates coming from a peer which is able to relate to them much better than a professor. The final 15 minutes of the talk I will just provide a short introduction and general overview of some of my research to show an example of what can be accomplished at graduate school. I think this will excite some students to see the possibilities and exciting fields of toxicology. I will then provide an informal setting, possibly with refreshments and snacks for the students to come up to Dr. Roth and me to ask any questions about toxicology or graduate training. Dr. Roth will be able to answer questions of the students about working in the field and be able to answer any questions about graduate training based on his experience as a mentor for nearly three decades. In addition to this, Dr. Roth will lecture at the afternoon lecture for graduate students and faculty which will be more research based. We will invite any undergraduates who would like to learn more about our research to attend this seminar. I truly believe that undergraduates will also see the interaction between Dr. Roth and I and the friendship we have as another aspect of graduate school which is a positive that you do not usually get out of undergraduate training.

Presentation Format:
I would like to apply for support to visit Miami University in Oxford, Ohio to give a presentation explaining the field of toxicology and the opportunities for students in the field and in the SOT. I am a fourth year graduate student at Michigan State University in the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology. I am an active member of SOT, and the chairperson of the Student Advisory Committee this upcoming year. My research is based in liver toxicology and drug discovery toxicology. I received a B.S. in Biochemistry at Miami University and feel like it would be a great opportunity for me to reach out to the students there to inform them about careers and graduate programs in the field of toxicology. My PI, Dr. Robert Roth will travel with me to present to the students and to answer all questions. I have been in touch with Miami University, with Dr. Jerry Sarquis. He said they are extremely excited for the opportunity and would love to have us visit to give some presentations. Dr. Sarquis is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and can be reached for any questions at sarquijl@muohio.edu.


Applicant:
Daland R. Juberg

Campus Visited:
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN

Affiliation:
Dow AgroSciences,
Indianapolis, IN

Date of Visit:
11/7/2007

Amount Funded:
$95.60

Visitor(s):
Daland Juberg

Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
20

Target Audience:
Science-related majors including biology, chemistry, allied health sciences. Primarily will target undergraduates, although possibly some in early post-graduate training as well.

Presentation Format:
I will either present to all Biology majors during their regular Biology seminar series and/or conduct small discussionals.

How were students recruited for the event?
Via the Health Science Student Council

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
No—contact Dr. Carlson—he can do the rest

Description of the first talk or event:
SOT Canned Presentation on Toxicology
Approximately 20 in attendance
# Attending: 20

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Introduced these students to the science of toxicology; well-received, attentive throughout

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Too many slides on biotransformation—number of slides could be culled down to 30–35.

Materials used in the visit:  Slides, SOT brochures


Applicant:
Logan C. Stone

Campus Visited:
Bowling Green State University,
Bowling Green, OH

Affiliation:
Procter & Gamble Retiree,
Indian Springs, OH

Date of Visit:
11/7/2007

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Logan C. Stone

Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Specifics of the Project:
At this point, the project is in the planning stage. My contact at Bowling Green State University is Ms. Diana Carpenter, Associate Director of Student Services. She has been in contact with the Associate Dean of the College Of Arts and Science, Dr. Julie Barnes who in turn plans to contact the professor that teaches Biology 200, which is entitled “Biology Today”.

Presentation Format:
This course will be offered in the fall 2007, meets on a Monday evening from 6:00 PM to 7:15 PM and typically has over 100 students in attendance. My understanding is that most of the students who take this course are in their first year of college.

How were students recruited for the event?
Emails were sent to all students in the College of Arts & Sciences informing them of the Career Extravaganza. A brief biographical profile of each presenter was made available to students 2–3 weeks prior to the event.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
I am on the Arts and Sciences Advocates Committee that reports to the Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences. I can serve as a conduit for contacts on campus.

Description of the first talk or event:
Each of the presenters was assigned a “station” to talk to small groups of students. I had a short prepared statement to beak the ice and then followed with a brief overview of toxicology. I was engaged in talking with the students and answering their questions for the entire three hours allotted for the event. The students were attentive, asked probing questions and seemed genuinely interested in toxicology. A total of fifteen students attended the session and most stayed between 25–30 minutes. The students primarily were freshmen, while several were juniors and seniors.

Most important outcomes of the visit:
The most important outcome was having students who attended the session being aware of the potential of having a career as a toxicologist. Toxicology had not been considered as a career option by any of the students who attended the session. In fact, most were unfamiliar of toxicology as a scientific discipline. All of the students who attended were either biology or chemistry majors.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
This was the first Career Extravaganza event that the University has held. My hope is that positive feedback from students who participated in this event would lead to an increase in attendance in next year’s Career Extravaganza.

Materials used in the visit:  
Materials used were the SOT brochure and poster. I also shared information from SOT’s PowerPoint presentation with the students.

 

 2008

Applicant:
Daland R. Juberg

Campus Visited:
Wittenberg University,
Springfield, OH

Affiliation:
Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN

Date of Visit:
2/25/2008

Amount Funded:
$173.66

Visitor(s):
Daland R. Juberg 
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
20

Target Audience: 
Science-related majors including biology, chemistry, allied health sciences. Primarily will target undergraduates, although possibly some in early post-graduate training as well.

Presentation Format: 
I will either present to all Biology majors at Wittenberg during their regular Biology seminar series and/or conduct small discussionals.

How were students recruited for the event? 
Via the health science student council

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? 
No. Contact Dr. Carlson. He can do the rest.

Description of the first talk or event: 
SOT canned presentation on toxicology.
# Attending: 20

Most important outcomes of the visit: 
Introduced these students to the science of toxicology.  Well-received, attentive throughout.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: 
Too many slides on biotransformation.  Number of slides could be culled down to 30–35.

Materials used in the visit: Slides, SOT brochures
Applicant:
Melanie Fraites

Campus Visited:
Ithaca College,
Ithaca, NY

Affiliation:
US EPA,
RTP, NC

Date of Visit:
9/18/2008

Amount Funded:
$270

Visitor(s):
Melanie Fraites
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
39

Target Audience: 
Undergraduate biology/biochemistry/environmental science majors at a small liberal arts college. All required to perform at least one semester of research within a faculty lab.

Presentation Format: 
Present at the Biology Seminar class (Biology 41100) that is required of senior biology majors, but attended by students of all classes. Will also meet for lunch with a group of biology/biochemistry majors, and if possible, visit relevant upper level classes to discuss career opportunities in toxicology.

How were students recruited for the event? 
Presented at the Biology Seminar class (BIO 41100) that is required of senior biology majors, but attended by students of all classes, faculty, and the public. Students of the Enviornmental Toxicology Class were personally invited to come.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? 
Dr. Hardwick was my undergraduate advisor and mentor. We have kept in touch over the years, and she invited me back to speak.

Description of the first talk or event: 
One hour seminar/lecture in Biology 41100. In attendance were approximately 30 students, mostly seniors. Six faculty members attended and three members of the public. Questions were encouraged and answered throughout and following the talk.
# Attending: 39

Description of additional talks or events: 
Met with the Enviornmental Toxicology class to talk about research in toxicology and careers (10 students). Met with students after the Biology 41100 seminar to talk about graduate school and careers in toxicology (25 students).
# Attending: 35

Most important outcomes of the visit: 
Most of the students are focused on taking the MCAT; however, I believe my talk gave them a better sense of what they could do in a research career. They were able to get a lot of information about graduate school and a better understanding of what a toxicologist does everyday.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: 
I would have had dinner with the students after the seminar so that they could have more chances to ask me questions.

Materials used in the visit:   
During the first half of my talk, I spoke about my path to a career in toxicology (undergrad research, internships, graduate school, etc) The second half I gave different examples of the toxicology research done at the US EPA.

Other comments or suggestions:
This was a really great experience! I really enjoyed lecturing and talking to the students about careers.
Applicant:
Heather F. Lakatos

Campus Visited:
St. Lawrence University,
Canton, NY

Affiliation:
Univ. of Rochester
Department of
Environmental Medicine

Date of Visit:
10/17/2008

Amount Funded:
$349.63

Visitor(s):
Heather F. Lakatos
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
7 Students; 3 Faculty Members

Target Audience:
Target audience: The audience will include students and faculty of the science core. My aim is to share my enthusiasm for toxicology and grad school with a prospective student audience. In addition, I hope to interest some of the current faculty in including lessons on toxicology topics.

Presentation Format:
I will have several opportunities to meet with, talk to and present to students involved in the science program at St. Lawrence University. St. Lawrence is close to completing stage one of their new science facilities, which as an undergraduate student I was integral in planning. They want me to visit near the time of the facilities grand opening. I will give a formal seminar on my current research, participate in several classes that are offered in the fall semester, as well as have lunch with groups of the students in an informal setting. This format will allow students and faculty to see what goes on in a toxicology graduate program of study as well as allow them the opportunity to ask questions about several topics including, graduate school, toxicology, and career opportunities in toxicology.

How were students recruited for the event?
Signs for my talk, mentioned in classes, brought up in a discussion group for students preparing for grad school

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Erika is very easy to talk to and would happily welcome contact to help students with graduate school choices and decisions.

Description of the first talk or event:
Lunch—I had Lunch on Friday with one group of undergraduates interested in attending graduate school. The discussion was a bit of an open forum where they were able to ask me about my experience in grad school. There were 5 students and me.
Dinner—Saturday night I had dinner with 3 faculty members and a couple of other students to further discuss my grad school experience, what toxicology is about and how I came to decide to go to grad school for toxicology
# Attending: 7 Students; 3 Faculty Members

Description of additional talks or events:
Thursday Afternoon- Formal presentation of my data and the work that I have done. The talk was 45 minutes long and the audience was composed of both students and faculty.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Students were more excited about graduate school in general and though most had not heard or thought of toxicology as a direction they were interested in the field.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Not sure if I would change anything. I think it was a great opportunity to be able to talk to students and faculty about my research and toxicology.

Materials used in the visit:  
I used a PowerPoint presentation. However, since a lot of the data is still unpublished I will not be sending my presentation.


Applicant:
Myra Weiner

Campus Visited:
College of New Jersey,
Ewing, NJ

Affiliation:
TOXpertise, LLC,
Princeton, NJ

Date of Visit:
11/13/2008

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Myra Weiner
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Undergraduate biology and chemistry majors

Presentation Format:
One hour seminar on careers in toxicology, providing industrial examples of toxicological and regulatory projects. College staff will provide fliers and advertise the meeting.
Applicant:
Myra Weiner

Campus Visited:
Rider University,
Lawrenceville, NJ

Affiliation:
TOXpertise, LLC,
Princeton, NJ

Date of Visit:
11/20/2008

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Myra Weiner
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Undergraduate biology and chemistry majors

Presentation Format:
One hour seminar on careers in toxicology, providing industrial examples of toxicological and regulatory projects. College staff will provide fliers and advertise the meeting. Rider University will use their Science Learning Community program to recruit students to attend.

 

 2009

Applicant:
Stephen Lasley

Campus Visited:
Northwestern College of Iowa, IA

Affiliation:
Univ. Illinois
College of Medicine,
Peoria, IL

Date of Visit:
3/31/2009

Amount Funded:
$252.04

Visitor(s):
Stephen Lasley
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
11

How were students recruited for the event?
Brochures prepared for presentation as part of a campus theme day. Also, word of mouth reminders by Dr. Davis

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Would welcome campus visits from other toxicologists; repeatedly stated that a departmental speaker is a rare event for the College

Description of the first talk or event:
“Careers in Toxicology—Not Always in the Lab”, 7:30 PM–8:30 PM, Tuesday, March 31, presentation largely made to pre-med majors; primarily used General Introduction to Toxicology, Toxicology as a Discipline, and Careers in Toxicology slide sets from SOT Web site; additional 1 hr spent discussing topic and answering questions
# Attending: 11

Description of additional talks or events:
“Basic Concepts in Toxicology”, 10:45 AM–11:30 AM, and “Introduction to Neurotoxicology of Metals”, 1:15 PM–2:15 PM, both on Wednesday, April 1, presentations largely made to biology majors, interested faculty, parents, and community leaders; 1st talk used Toxicology Concepts slide set from SOT Web site, 2nd talk used personal research PowerPoint slides
# Attending: 35–40

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Initial contacts with host (Dr. Davis), student interest and enthusiasm

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Have admission materials available from nearby colleges with graduate programs in toxicology

Materials used in the visit:  
See descriptions of the presentations above

Other comments or suggestions:
Students and faculty very pleased with my visit, very happy that someone would come speak to them concerning careers in science


Applicant:
Joshua Gray

Campus Visited:
US Coast Guard Academy

Affiliation:
US Coast Guard Academy,
New London, CT

Date of Visit:
4/22/2009

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Michael Shakarjian
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Senior undergraduates taking a Toxicology elective, open to student body and faculty

Presentation Format:
The toxicology class will attend, but the venue will be changed to an auditorium so that the wider community is able to attend. The speaker will also meet informally with the students for lunch to discuss career and graduate school options in toxicology.

How were students recruited for the event?
Michael taught a lecture in the undergraduate Toxicology class. He also gave a one hour seminar at 8:00 PM as part of a lecture series at the Academy.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Member of SOT. The campus contact initiated the guest lecture activity.

Description of the first talk or event:
Molecular targets of vesicating agents in the skin, and the design of countermeasures to prevent vesicant-mediated injury.
# Attending:

Description of additional talks or events:
Environmental effects of improperly disposed chemical weapons.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Direct exposure of students to a practicing academic researcher and expert in the field of chemical weapons.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Perhaps better recruitment to encourage better attendance. Students were mandated to attend the lecture. It was optional for students to attend the evening. A flier was posted, and a paper mailing and email letter were sent to the community at large.


Applicant:
Maureen Gwinn

Campus Visited:
Bates College,
Lewiston, ME

Affiliation:
US EPA,
Washington, DC

Date of Visit:
10/12/2009

Amount Funded:
$100

Visitor(s):
Herman Lilja, Neal Lewin, and Deborah Rice
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Undergraduates in the biological sciences (mainly juniors/seniors) interested in learning more about careers in toxicology.

Presentation Format:
Three to four visiting toxicologists will briefly present their path to a career in Toxicology (10–15 min each) and then remain as a panel to discuss the various careers in toxicology. Although not all confirmed, the panel participants include a toxicologist in the federal government (Gwinn), in industry (Lilja), in State government (Smith/Rice—TBD), in academics (Sommer/Wise—TBD) and potentially in medicine (Lewin). Presentations and panel will be part of the regular seminar series and students would be recruited through the science departments on campus. Further, it may be possible to extend the invitation to other area students depending on timing and space constraints. Scheduled date is Monday, October 12 with the opportunity to have a lunch and learn session with students during the day, and then the panel presentations in the afternoon.

How were students recruited for the event?
Students were recruited through Dr. Sommer's classes and throughout the Carnegie Science building.

Description of the first talk or event:
Drs. Gwinn and Lilja had lunch with Dr. Sommer's first-year course on “Toxicology in Public Health.” Students were previously asked to review the SOT information on careers in toxicology, and were encouraged to ask questions related to the panelists careers and education path. Drs. Gwinn and Lilja spoke briefly about their current and past careers in toxicology and answered questions during the hour-long session.
# Attending:

Description of additional talks or events:
Drs. Gwinn, Lilja, and Pokras briefly discussed their careers in toxicology and the education paths that led to their current positions. The panelists then answered questions related to what toxicologists do in the different positions, and any specific questions related to different careers in toxicology.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
One clear messge that came through was that toxicologists are made through multiple pathways. For all three panelists, three different (fairly circuitous) routes were described, and yet all work in the field of toxicology.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
I think it was a fairly positive experience all around.

Materials used in the visit:  Slides
Applicant:
Mindy Reynolds

Campus Visited:
Washington College,
Chestertown, MD

Affiliation:
Washington College,
Chestertown, MD

Date of Visit:
10/13/2009

Amount Funded:
$267.96

Visitor(s):
Aaron Barchowsky
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Junior and senior undergraduate students

Presentation Format:
Washington College requires students to take a junior and senior seminar (approximately 50 students). Aaron Barchowsky's presentation will occur during the normally scheduled class period. The visit will include giving a lecture on toxicology and careers in toxicology as well as an opportunity for a small forum to discuss graduate school. In addition to these presentations, Washington College’s Sigma Xi chapter will host a reception which will enable students to speak with Aaron one-on-one about individual questions they may have.

How were students recruited for the event?
This was part of a Biology senior seminar series which all senior BIO majors were required to attend. In addition, advertisements were distributed throughout the campus to encourage other students to attend.

Description of the first talk or event:
Aaron Barchowsky gave a presentation on toxicology, careers in toxicology, as well as the graduate school process. In order to do this he used many of the toxicology slides which are available on the SOT Web site. Following the presentation there was an informal reception in which students could ask questions one-on-one. In addition to the reception, Aaron and myself went out to dinner with three students who are in the process of preparing their graduate school applications. This gave the students the chance to ask additional questions as well as get ideas about how to strengthen their applications.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Washington College is a small liberal arts college which only offers one class in Toxicology. Aaron’s visit gave the students a better understanding of Toxicology, its broader impact in society, and career opportunities which are available. In addition to the Toxicology talk Aaron also spent some time speaking about graduate school and the graduate school application processes. For a small school such as Washington College where the students are not as exposed to such topics this was extremely beneficial.

Materials used in the visit:
Aaron presented SOT slides

Other comments or suggestions:
I was originally told I would have additional funding from Sigma Xi and Tri-Beta but due to recent budget cuts at the campus these funding sources were eliminated.


Applicant:
Janelle S. Crossgrove

Campus Visited:
Ohio Northern University,
Ada, OH

Affiliation:
Ohio Northern University,
Ada, OH

Date of Visit:
10/22/2009

Amount Funded:
$94.80

Visitor(s):
David R. Mattie
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
5

Target Audience:
Ohio Northern University (ONU) is a unique school containing colleges of liberal arts, engineering, pharmacy, business and law. This speaker is targeted toward students from the liberal arts and engineering interested in biomedical applications and students in the pharmaceutical business and pharmacy programs, interested in toxicology and its role in industry and government.

Presentation Format:
There will be two types of meetings with Dr. Mattie. He will give a traditional lecture covering his research, and he will meet in a smaller group to discuss career opportunities in toxicology. The large lecture will have a target audience of students interested in biomedical science, which may include students majoring in pharmacy, nursing, biology, forensic science, clinical lab science, pharmaceutical business and engineering with a focus on biomedical applications. The lecture will be given during regular class time for the pharmacy biomedical science class, and we anticipate an audience of about 150 students. Dr. Mattie will also meet informally with students interested in graduate school to discuss educational and career options in toxicology. We expect that 15–30 students will attend this meeting.

How were students recruited for the event?
Through email announcements and flyers posted throughout campus

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
In this case, the campus contact and the visiting scholar are both members of the Regional Chapter (OVSOT), and contact was made through these channels.

Description of the first talk or event:
Dr. Mattie delivered a lecture entitled “Predictive Toxicology Research” at NOON in a large lecture hall. This time and venue were chosen to fit into the shedules of most pharmacy, biology, and chemistry students. The speaker presented an overview of his work and also included information on toxicology as a career choice.
# Attending: 5

Description of additional talks or events:
Later that afternoon, the speaker met with a small group of students interested in graduate school. Dr. Mattie provided insight into toxicology as a field of study and insight into a career working for the government. Cookies were provided.
# Attending: 6

Most important outcomes of the visit:
As far as we know, this was our Regional Chapter’s first use of this program. It was helpful to learn the importance of on-campus logistics. Also, Dr. Mattie has expressed interest in visiting other campuses, and this experience will serve to make those visits even smoother.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
More effective advertisement and (perhaps) academic incentive for students to attend would have increased attendance.

Materials used in the visit:  
Lab overview, SOT slides, predictive toxicology projects.

 

 2010

Applicant:
Luoping Zhang

Campus Visited:
University of California, Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA

Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Date of Visit:
2/4/10–4/22/10

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
Tao Wang, Jeff Tepper, Martha Sandy, Meg Schwarzman, Noe Galvan, Kathleen Meyer)
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
14

Target Audience:
A course designed for a diverse body of advanced undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in learning more about toxicology.

Presentation Format:
Professionals in a variety of toxicology fields (industry, pharmacy, academia, government, etc.) were invited to speak each bimonthly session about their backgrounds, fields, and areas of expertise, to give students a better understanding of toxicology. The session also includes an informal Q&A session over a convivial lunch for the students to network and become more acquainted with the guest speakers.

How were students recruited for the event?
Class fliers were sent out to various undergraduate and graduate email list servers.

Description of the first talk or event:
30 minute intimate Q&A session between students and guest lecture during lunch, followed by 50 minutes of guest lecture, typically in PowerPoint format, and ending with 10 minutes of follow up questions. Audience included 12 students—6 graduate students and 6 undergraduate students.
# Attending: 14

Most important outcomes of the visit:
To introduce students to the wide field of toxicology.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
I always wish for more time, as the students always have many questions for the guest speakers.

Materials used in the visit: 
Guest lecturers provided PowerPoint slides; some guest speakers also sent journal articles for the students to read ahead of time.


Applicant:
Mindy Reynolds

Campus Visited:
Washington College,
Chestertown, MD

Affiliation:
Washington College, Chestertown, MD

Date of Visit:
3/23/2010

Amount Funded:
$404.83

Visitor(s):
Haley Menard   
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
35

Target Audience:
Junior and senior undergraduate students.

Presentation Format:
Washington College requires students to take a junior and senior seminar (approximately 50 students). Haley Menard's presentation occurred during the normally scheduled class period. The visit included giving a lecture on toxicology, her research, and why she chose to go to graduate school. Haley will also have lunch and dinner with the students enabling them the opportunity to ask individual questions.

How were students recruited for the event? 
This was part of a Biology senior seminar series which all senior bio majors were required to attend. In addition, advertisements were distributed throughout the campus to encourage other students to attend.

Description of the first talk or event:   
Haley Menard gave a presentation on getting into graduate school, things to consider, her perspective, and what she plans to do with a Ph.D. in toxicology. Following the presentation there was an informal reception in which students could ask questions one-on-one. In addition to the reception, Haley had a session prior to the presentation to allow the students to ask her questions about her graduate career. This also gave the students the chance to ask additional questions as well as get ideas about how to strengthen their applications.
 # Attending: 35

Most important outcomes of the visit: 
Washington College is a small liberal arts college which only offers one class in Toxicology. Haley’s visit gave the students a better understanding of graduate school, toxicology, its broader impact in society, and career opportunities which are available. For a small school such as Washington College where the students are not as exposed to such topics this was extremely beneficial.

Materials used in the visit: 
Haley presented a powerpoint presentation.


Applicant:
April Neal

Campus Visited:
Grinnell College,
Grinnell, IA

Affiliation:
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Date of Visit:
9/10/2010

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
April Neal
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
20

Target Audience:  
Undergraduate students majoring in Chemistry, Biology, and Biological Chemistry as well as senior undergraduates taking advanced coursework in Biophysical Chemistry.

Presentation Format: 
Students were recruited through the departments of Chemistry, Biology and Biological Chemistry. The lecture was advertised as part of the seminar series for these departments and will draw a range of students from first year undergraduates to senior students. The talk given in this broad seminar series was on the discipline of toxicology in general, with examples on lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicology. and was geared towards an audience which may not have any experience with toxicological sciences. At the end of the talk, career path discussions were addressed in toxicology, focusing on careers in academic, government, and industrial settings. This served as the platform for a luncheon with the students, many of whom were interested in graduate programs in toxicology.  In addition to the seminar outlined above, an advanced talk was given on recent work with pyrethroid insecticides to the senior Biophysics course taught by Dr. Levandoski.

How were students recruited for the event? 
It was advertised as part of the series on fliers and on the campus events calendar. It was also advertised by faculty during classes.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? 
Just go head and email them, they are very responsive.

Description of the first talk or event: 
1st event: Journal club with Biophysical Chemistry students (course CHM 332) on recent publication in Toxicological Sciences (Neal et al, (2010). Allethrin differentially modulates voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes in rat PC12 cells. Toxicol. Sci. 116(2): 604-613).
# Attending: 20

Description of additional talks or events: 
2nd event: Seminar “The Effects of Lead on Neurons: A Case Study in Toxiclogy” as part of the Biology Seminar Series.
3rd event: Lunch with senior Chemistry and Biological Chemistry students. Also discussed were Toxicology graduate programs and the annual Society of Toxicology meeting, along with what type of coursework tox programs want in incoming students.
# Attending: 50

Most important outcomes of the visit: 
In many cases this was the first toxicology oriented research to which the students were exposed. Students were engaged in both environmental and mechanistic toxicology and distributed literature provided by SOT regarding toxicology careers and the student-mentor travel awards.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: 
I had a great visit and had great attendance. I can’t think of any improvements

Materials used in the visit: 
Discussion in the biophysics course was on the recent publication listed (copy attached). The seminar was on presentation slides derived from a general lecture given in the past on lead neurotoxicology, from exposure to mechanistic research.


Applicant:
Peter Goering

Campus Visited:
Purdue University School of Health Sciences,
West Lafayette, IN

Affiliation:
FDA, Washington, D.C.

Date of Visit:
9/28/2010

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Peter Goering
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
175

Target Audience:  
Undergraduate students

Presentation Format: 
SOT slides and FDA slides. Concluded with “Career in Toxicology” slides from SOT.

Description of the first talk or event: 
Introductory course where science professionals shared about career opportunities in their respective field. Merged between some of SOT slides (What is Toxicology) and some of “What Is FDA?” slides, which segued into two specific examples of how FDA research from my toxicology division has had an impact on public health. Concluded with “Careers in Toxicology” slides from SOT slide deck.
# Attending: 175

Description of additional talks or events: 
Presented a research seminar to the graduate students of the School of Health Sciences.

Most important outcomes of the visit: 
Everyday impact of toxicology and the FDA made a good impression overall. The 50 SOT trifold brochures provided by SOT headquarters staff rapidly disappeared after the lecture.

Materials used in the visit: 
 SOT slides and brochures

Other comments or suggestions:
SOT ToxScholar program plays a role in building for the future of toxicology, and SOT members should be encouraged to participate.

 

 2011

Applicant:
Itai Chipinda

Campus Visited:
University of Central Missouri,
Warrensburg, MO

Affiliation:
CDC/NIOSH
Morgantown, WV

Date of Visit:
3/30/2011

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
Itai Chipinda
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
340

Target Audience:
Undergraduate Chemistry and Biochemistry Students

Presentation Format:
The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department scheduled and advertised a seminar. Dr. Chipinda met with faculty before the seminar. He also interacted with students before and after seminar.

How were students recruited for the event?
The UCMO Chemistry and Biochemistry advertised the visit on their Web site and posted flyers on the campus. Undergraduate students and high school students were encouraged to attend the UCMO Science Fair. Students were provided transport to come to the fair. The presentation was the keynote speech for the fair and so students were encouraged to attend. Students received a credit for attending the afternoon departmental talk.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Starting the arrangements well before the visit allows wider advertising of the lecture and allows both students and faculty to fit the talk into their schedules. Email exchanges with the school contact and encouraging the contact to notify other departments certainly helps in boosting the attendance.

Description of the first talk or event:
The audience was around 230 high school students and about 110 undergraduate students in the main auditorium. High school students were seated in clusters according to their schools with the teachers present. The talk was a 40 min lecture on what toxicology is, the SOT and its structures, graduate school and career opportunities. Students were asking questions as the talk progressed. The speaker went around each cluster of students interacting with them, answering questions and making sure they had collected the SOT flyers.
# Attending: 340

Description of additional talks or events:
This was in a smaller lecture room where the attendance was mainly chemistry and biochemistry majors with a few graduate students from the Biology department. The faculty was in attendance as well. This talk was on the toxicology research currently conducted in our labs and the recruitment of summer student interns.
# Attending: 45

Most important outcomes of the visit:
The UCMO department will work on becoming actively involved in the Ohio Valley Regional Chapter of the SOT. A couple of students expressed interest in joining our lab as summer interns.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Meeting faculty members from other departments such as Biology, Math and Physics will certainly help in that students from other departments which are not the target department will be encouraged to attend.

Materials used in the visit:
Will be forwarding some slides from my presentation


Applicant:
Linval R. DePass

Campus Visited:
University of the West Indies, Mona Campus,
Kingston, Jamaica

Affiliation:
Executive Director Nonclinical Safety, Durect Corporation, Cupertino, CA

Date of Visit:
3/31/2011

Amount Funded:
$961.49

Visitor(s):
Linval R. DePass
Funded by:
Global ToxScholar
Number Reached:
50–60

Target Audience:
Undergraduate and graduate students

Presentation Format:
The visit was comprised of two seminar-type presentations to students involved in a Forensic Science Master's Program (of which Toxicology forms a major component) as well as other students who are studying in related fields such as biological sciences, chemistry, etc. In my presentation, I used material from lectures I have given at the Berkeley and Davis campuses of the University of California, as well as the SOT slide set, to describe toxicology as a science and as a profession. There is interest in mounting a postgraduate program in Toxicology proper at UWI. Additional meetings with interested faculty and university administration were planned to more greatly sensitize them to toxicology as a profession and to raise their awareness of the potential educational and career opportunities currently available to their students.

How were students recruited for the event?
There were flyers and other verbal announcements.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
He is available via email.

Description of the first talk or event:
My first lecture was “Preclinical Drug Testing Toxicology Procedures.” This was a lecture and discussion with primarily undergraduate Pharmacology students. There were also some forensic toxicology students and a few faculty members.
# Attending: 50–60

Description of additional talks or events:
The second lecture was primarily devoted to Careers in toxicology, attended by 30–40 students of various backgrounds. On the following day, I gave an “Introduction to Toxicology” lecture that was attended by forensic toxicology students as well as some Biochemistry and Chemistry students, total of 20–30 students. The professor in charge of the Forensic Toxicology program also participated. This sequence of lectures was not very logical, but it seemed to fit the students’ schedule according to the faculty coordinator. While at UWI, the Dean of Pure and applied Sciences invited me to attend the Annual Awards Ceremony for his division at which he announced my visit and encouraged students to attend my lecture on the following day and to interact with me during my visit.
# Attending: 30–40

Most important outcomes of the visit:
My lectures were well received. In addition, I had separate meetings with the faculty including the Pro Vice Chancellor and the Dean mentioned above as well as other faculty who teach pharmacology and toxicology courses.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
I would like to have had more control over the schedule of lectures but they were the hosts and they did what they thought would work best for their students. For example, I would have given the Introduction to Toxicology lecture first to the widest possible audience and not focused so much on students who were already studying toxicology or related fields like pharmacology. Many of the students who attended my Drug Safety lecture first did not return for the subsequent lectures and therefore missed the Introduction to Toxicology lecture.

Materials used in the visit:
I used the SOT slide set as well as a slide set I created for lectures I have given at local Bay Area universities. I will send you my slides.

Other comments or suggestions:
I think my visit was very successful and very much appreciated by the faculty and administration of UWI. I hope to continue to serve as a resource for students and post-docs from UWI who may want to continue their education at American universities and other institutions at which I have contacts such as UC Berkeley, UC Davis and FDA-NCTR.

Additional Feedback:
“I have now spoken with Wayne McLaughlin (Head of Basic Medical Sciences), Maxine Gossell-Williams (Pharmacology) and Paul Singh (Pharmacology) and they all agree that your visit was a resounding success. The students at all levels were duly impressed with what you had to say and were very relieved to hear about the wide range of career options that are open to them in the area of toxicology. They seem to have been particularly pleased to receive the information from a Jamaican with whom they could easily identify and who could empathise with the local situation. I understand that students from the Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health programme also attended your Seminar. All agree that you have stimulated them tremendously and they are now asking that we introduce this sort of visiting expert talk as a constant feature of our annual programme. Paul Singh was very grateful for your discussions with him concerning the development of useful laboratory exercises for the undergraduate programme. They are keen to have further interactions with you and perhaps to pick your brain in the area of drug development and to get your input and through you, that of the Society of Toxicology, with respect to identifying useful visiting lecturers in the areas of Environmental, Forensic and Clinical Toxicology. The possibility of getting your help with vetting research as well as developmental proposals in the area of Toxicology was also queried, as well as with placements of our better students in laboratories where they could be exposed to best practices and techniques in Toxicology.

I sincerely thank you for making this extremely worthwhile effort and also ask you to thank the Society of Toxicology for helping to make your visit possible. I hope that this will just be the beginning of a long and mutually beneficial relationship with the toxicology-related groups here at the UWI.”

Sincerely,
Ronald E. Young, Ph.D.

Pro Vice Chancellor (Graduate Studies)
The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus
Kingston 7, Jamaica, West Indies


Applicant:
Itai Chipinda

Campus Visited:
Franklin College,
Franklin, IN

Affiliation:
CDC/NIOSH
Morgantown, WV

Date of Visit:
4/14/2011

Amount Funded:
$456.92

Visitor(s):
Itai Chipinda
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
340

Target Audience:
Undergraduate Chemistry and Biochemistry Students

Presentation Format:
Department scheduled and advertised a seminar. Speaker met with faculty before the seminar. Speaker interacted with students before and after seminar.

How were students recruited for the event?
The Franklin College Chemistry department advertised the visit on their Web site and posted flyers on the campus. The Chemistry Club also distributed flyers encouraging students from all science departments to attend. Students were provided snacks and drinks to come to the talk. Students received a credit for attending the afternoon presentation.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Starting the arrangements well before the visit allows wider advertising of the lecture and allows both students and faculty to fit the talk into their schedules. Email exchanges with the school contact and encouraging the contact to notify other departments certainly helps in boosting the attendance. Having the visit advertised on departmental Web sites helps in encouraging both faculty and students to attend the talk.

Description of the first talk or event:
The audience was around 80 undergraduate students in the main auditorium. The talk was a 40 minute lecture on what toxicology is, the SOT and its structures, graduate school and career opportunities. Students were asking questions as the talk progressed. The speaker went around interacting with students, answering questions and making sure they had collected the SOT flyers.
# Attending: 340

Description of additional talks or events:
This was in a smaller lecture room where the attendance was mainly Chemistry Club members, chemistry and biochemistry majors with a few graduate students from other departments. The faculty was in attendance as well. This talk was on the toxicology research currently conducted in our labs and the recruitment of summer student interns.
# Attending: 45

Most important outcomes of the visit:
The FC department will work on becoming actively involved in the Ohio Valley Regional Chapter of the SOT. Our lab will be collaborating with one of the faculty members and this will enable us to host some of his students as summer interns.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Meeting more faculty members from other departments such as Biology, Math, and Physics will certainly help in attracting students from these departments. These departments can advertise the visit on their Web site and this would give the visit more coverage on compass.

Materials used in the visit:
Used SOT flyers and brochures that were sent to me from SOT. These were also distributed to other departments. Will forward slides from my presentation.


Applicant:
Luoping Zhang

Campus Visited:
University of California
Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Affiliation:
University of California
Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

Date of Visit:
2/3/2011, 2/17/11; 3/3/11; 3/17/11; 3/31/11; 4/14/11; 4/21/11

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
Luoping Zhang Tao Wang, Noe Galvan Jeff Tepper, Katheleen Meyer Martha Sandy Megan Schwarzman
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
20 (13 undergraduates and 7 graduates)

Target Audience:
Professionals, most of them are members of SOT and/or NorCal SOT, in a variety of toxicology fields (government, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, consulting, academia, etc.) are invited to speak each bimonthly session about their backgrounds, fields and areas of expertise, to give students a better understanding of toxicology.

Presentation Format:
Speak each bimonthly session about their backgrounds, fields and areas of expertise, to give students a better understanding of toxicology. The highlight of the session also includes an informal Q&A session over a convivial lunch for the students to network and become more acquainted with the guest speakers.

How were students recruited for the event?
Class fliers, undergraduate and graduate email list servers, campus online scheduler, and word of mouth by previous students as well as professors.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Email Luoping Zhang is preferred, but arrangements could also be made by coming into the office at 237 Hildebrand Hall.

Description of the first talk or event:
The audience generally consisted of undergraduate (Juniors and Seniors) and graduate students as well as a couple auditors. Class is scheduled for 2 hours, in which students personally engage the speaker at a section called “Q&A: Lunch with Experts” followed by an hour lecture.
# Attending: 20—13 undergraduates and 7 graduates

Description of additional talks or events:
All lecture sessions followed the format described above, except the field trip to NorCal SOT's Spring Symposium and students' presentations from their group projects conducted from this course. All speakers were invited to attend and to see the progress students have made from the lectures.
# Attending: 20

Most important outcomes of the visit:
To introduce students to the wide field of toxicology and to build professional connections with established toxicologists according to student interest.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
Extend the length of the class, as students usually had many questions and only a brief period to conduct their own projects to practice in toxicology.

Materials used in the visit:
Guest lecturers brought power point slides, while some also provided referenced documents and journal articles for the students to read ahead of time and review after class. The biography or CV of each speaker was also made available to the students before each class meeting.

Other comments or suggestions:
Without the support from US and NorCal SOT, this specially designed “Practical Toxicology” course could have been canceled at Berkeley, so we extend our appreciation in your continued support. Thank you so much!

 

 2012

Applicant: Peter Goering

Campus Visited:
Pennsylvania State University

Affiliation:

Date of Visit:
3/24/2012

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
60

Target Audience:

Presentation Format:
I was invited to speak at the third annual Undergraduate Research Conference at The Pennsylvania State University on March 24, 2012. These annual conferences are organized by the Penn State Undergraduate Biomedical Sciences Club. The goal of this conference was to give current undergraduate students the opportunity to meet with distinguished professionals in the field of biomedical sciences. The conference was attended by approximately 60 students. The agenda consisted of two concurrently running presentations by invited scientists, followed by a special session for all students, such as resume writing, GRE preparation, etc. This cycle repeated three more times throughout the day. The conference concluded with a plenary presentation during dinner.


Applicant: Brittany Baisch

Campus Visited:
Western Connecticut State University

Affiliation:
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

Date of Visit:
4/12/2012

Amount Funded:
$454.02

Visitor(s): Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:
Undergraduate students whose majors include, but are not limited to, Chemistry, Biocehmistry, Biology, Meteorology, Justice & Law Administration, Pre-vet, Pre-dental, Pre-med and Pre-Law. We expect some faculty members to attend as well, including the department chairs. The students will be freshman-senior level students who do not have a background in Toxicology, but do have research and possibly some industry experience. We expect equal attendance by both male and female students as well as students from different demographic backgrounds and international students. Moreover, students at WCSU have several different backgrounds and range in age from their early 20s to 40s. This program will provide information about careers in toxicology that are relevant for all of the student attendees.

Presentation Format:
I am invited to speak during a seminar slot that is one seminar in a series that is mandatory for Chemistry and Biology students. I am directly collaborating with the Chemistry Dept. and Chemistry Club, and they will distribute flyers around campus and to faculty members via email to announce them in their classes in order to promote attendance in other departments. Also, I am requesting that the seminar be announced in the daily e-news (Blackboard system) of the WCSU web. I am also submitting an announcement to the WCSU Public Relations Office. The talk will be held in a new, state-of-the-art auditorium in the science building, on a Friday afternoon, immediately following the last class of the day, to ensure that students are available to attend. I will utilize the SOT ToxScholar slides in order to present the material, and I will engage students by calling on them and asking them questions. In addition, I will incorporate my own research and experiences as a graduate student to facilitate my talk. In addition, WCSU is hosting a reception following the talk, in order for students to ask questions one-on-one and to engage in further discussion about career opportunities in toxicology.

How were students recruited for the event?
I was invited to give a presentation in a time slot for the students’ mandatory seminar series, where guest speakers from a variety of different Chemical/Biochemical backgrounds are invited to speak. This worked well, because I had a guaranteed attendance of 20 and because I was a graduate of this institution, there were additional faculty members and students also attended because they were interested in hearing my seminar and learning more about toxicology.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Email the chair(s) of the department directly. I found it difficult to get in touch with the professors by phone.

Description of the first talk or event:
45 minute PowerPoint presentation followed by 10-15 minutes of Q+A regarding the talk. Followed by an additional 1 hour Q+A regarding SOT and the life of a graduate student. 30 students attended, 10 department faculty members and 5 were marked “other.”
# Attending:

Description of additional talks or events:
Question and Answer session about SOT and graduate school followed immediately after the seminar and was attended by all of the students and faculty who attended the seminar.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Typically, recent graduates of WCSU give talks during this seminar series that are tailored around their field of graduate study and/or work experiences. The professors at WCSU were particularly interested in an introduction to toxicology and SOT as well as the actual graduate program and institution of which I am enrolled. So, I tailored my talk to exactly what they were looking for and integrated some University of Rochester research and graduate school info with the slides that SOT provided. This was very effective, especially when I talked about what courses undergraduates should take now while at WCSU and when I introduced SOT’s Undergraduate Peer Mentoring program. I think it personalized the information for the students and they felt a connection to what I was talking about. They were very interested in hearing more about what they can do right now, before graduate school, to enhance their chances at being accepted to graduate programs in toxicology. I was also told that there were several pre-vet and pre-med students in the department so I added info about how toxicology is related to those broader fields and tried to include examples and case studies in my slides that took place fairly local to WCSU to drive home the importance of toxicology to everyday life. I also provided electronic copies of the slides that had more general information about SOT and the University of Rochester’s graduate program to students who asked for them, which I think was better than bringing all of the brochures and hand outs, because often times students feel forced into taking them who aren’t genuinely interested. This also ends up costing SOT more money to have extra things printed. I think providing the websites and information electronically is most effective for this generation of undergraduates. Also, it would have been a lot of material to carry with me!

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
I would have included more information about laboratory techniques that toxicologists use, or general lab techniques that are used in graduate school (e.g. western blotting, PCR, cell culture, etc.) but time didn’t really permit. Maybe this could be a separate presentation but I think the students would appreciate it.

Other comments or suggestions:
I encourage students to tie in their graduate research and their graduate school/program into the talk and integrate it with the slides that SOT provides. This personalized my talk and kept the students interested and engaged because I could speak to things based on my own experiences.


Applicant:
Joshua P. Gray

Campus Visited:
US Coast Guard Academy,
New London, CT

Affiliation:
US Coast Guard Academy
New London, CT

Date of Visit:
9/29/2012

Amount Funded:
$114.94

Visitor(s):
Larissa Williams
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
100

Target Audience:
Entire sophomore class.

Presentation Format:
Attendance by students is mandatory for the science seminar series. In this evening seminar, Dr. Williams will present an hour-long research talk on adaptation of an estuarine organism to a PCB-contaminated Superfund site located about an hour north of the academy. This lecture will bring to light how toxicology can be used to address questions related to anthropogenic contamination of the aquatic environment and subsequent changes of organisms living in that environment. Additionally, Dr. Williams will give a lecture in the biochemistry course during the day about biochemical mechanisms of aquatic toxicological responses.

How were students recruited for the event?
Larissa met with faculty and gave an evening lecture. The following day, she met with some Cadets for lunch.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact?
Member of SOT. The campus contact initiated the guest lecture activity.

Description of the first talk or event:
The New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site: Politics, Pollution, and Adaptation
# Attending: 100

Description of additional talks or events:
Lunch with Cadets involved in research. Career counseling.
# Attending:

Most important outcomes of the visit:
Direct exposure of students to a young, successful postdoctoral scientist. A good role model for the students.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome:
I would like to have had more attendance at the lunch the following day.

Materials used in the visit:
Cadets taking Marine Pollution and one other course were required to attend. A flier was posted, email list-serve for the lecture series was used, and the local newspaper published in paper and online the details of the talk.

Other comments or suggestions:
Yes, an honorarium for the evening lecture was given ($300), which includes the cost of travel. Larissa was provided with meals. SOT was asked to reimburse the hotel for the evening.


Applicant:
John C. Lipscomb

Campus Visited:
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Affiliation:
US EPA, Cincinnati, OH

Date of Visit:
10/17/2012

Amount Funded:
$0

Visitor(s):
John C. Lipscomb
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
185

Target Audience: Graduate and undergrad students attending a career day at UAMS from University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; University of Arkansas at Little Rock, AR; Henderson State University, Arkadelphia, AR; and others

Presentation Format: Several speakers will address their specific career paths; I am asked to talk about my government toxicology positions at US FDA, Air Force and US EPA

How were students recruited for the event? UAMS recruited students from regional universities for this annual UAMS event.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? Campus contact would be most useful in helping SOT contact interested faculty and students at multiple participating universities. POC on the ground at UAMS is Dr. Kristen Sterba.

Description of the first talk or event: John C. Lipscomb was invited and traveled to his alma mater, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), in Little Rock, AR, to take part in Career Day. This annual event is conducted for the benefit of undergraduate and graduate students in area universities. Eighteen undergraduate universities, including two HBCU, were represented. The audience comprised 14 post docs, 63 graduate students and 108 undergraduate students. Students were treated to six 20 minute presentations made by health professionals whose positions were in state public health departments, chemistry departments in industry, researcher departments in academia and others. Dr. Lipscomb was introduced by former classmate and Dean of the Graduate School, Dr. Robert McGehee. John’s presentation was on his experiences as a Toxicologist and federal government employee, where he discussed his work and anecdotes from bench toxicology and metabolism/pharmacokinetics research at US FDA/NCTR (Jefferson, AR) and in the Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB, as well as in human health risk assessment at the US EPA. He discussed the value of joining professional organizations like local chapters of professional societies, including SOT. Many facets of Toxicology were presented including mechanistic and dose-response analysis. The relationship of these facets to risk assessment and protection of public health were discussed. Dr. Lipscomb made it a point to discuss the friendships and professional relationships that began in the South Central Chapter of SOT in the mid 1980’s, and the fact that he still collaborates and publishes with some of those friends. The benefits of government employment were presented, and served as the basis for several questions. It is fair to say that the students were somewhat surprised at his presentation of the pathway that led from original intentions of being a wildlife biologist to becoming a human health risk assessor. His presentation centered on gaining experience and double-checking career intent and weighing options at regular intervals. The emphasis was on pursuing higher education and the many different fields of work that can be pursued through a graduate education in toxicology. Following the completion of the student Q&A session over a panel lunch, John met with several faculty members from universities, pointed out opportunities with the Society of Toxicology, and provided hand-out materials. Visiting universities included: Arkansas State University, Arkansas Tech University, Central Baptist College, Christian Brothers University (TN), Harding University, Henderson State University, Hendrix College, Jackson State University (MS), John Brown University, Lane College (MS), Lyon College, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, University of Arkansas at Fort Smith, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, University of Arkansas at Monticello, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, University of Central Arkansas, and University of Louisiana at Monroe (LA).

Most important outcomes of the visit: Convincing undergraduate students to pursue graduate education, keeping an eye out for their field of interest as a component of Toxicology. Discussions that may lead to an invitation to visit Jackson State University (a HBCU) in February.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: More direct contact with faculty from visiting universities.

Materials used in the visit: Pamphlets provided by SOT, some presentation slides provided by SOT.

Other comments or suggestions: Dialogue with Jackson State must be continued. Toxicology resources at the University of Mississippi might be employed.

 

 2013

Applicant:
Chris Curran

Campus Visited:
Northern Kentucky University

Affiliation:
Northern Kentucky University

Date of Visit:
3/22/2013

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
Pam Lein
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
250

Target Audience: Undergraduate biology, chemistry and psychology students.Those attending were primarily from Northern Kentucky University, but the event was promoted at other nearby colleges and universities including the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University and Thomas More College. Student groups at NKU assisted with the planning and promotion of the event. These include the Tri-Beta Biological Sciences Honor Society, the NKU Health Professions Club, the NKU Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society, and the Psi Chi Psychology Honor Society

Presentation Format: Dr. Pam Lein discussed research into the environmental factors associated with the development of autism as a part of a ½ day symposium on autism.

How were students recruited for the event? Advertised across campus with flyers, Web calendar notices and through Blackboard “all-student” lists for Biology, Chemistry and Psychology. Met with leaders of six student organizations in health sciences and environmental sciences to solicit volunteers

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? She’s an SOT member. Just email her!

Description of the first talk or event: Dr. Lein’s lecture was part of a half-day symposium on autism geared toward undergraduate students, but also open to the general campus community and partner K–12 teachers. The formal program is attached.
# Attending: 250

Description of additional talks or events: Invited students (~30) took part in a lunch with symposium speakers prior to the event for informal discussions of career opportunities and toxicology research. A smaller group of students attended a formal dinner with Dr. Lein in the evening.
# Attending: 30

Most important outcomes of the visit: There was a tremendous turnout with over 250 in attendance. The majority were undergraduates from Northern Kentucky University.

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: Possible feedback form for students to capture those who gained a new interest in toxicology.

Materials used in the visit: PowerPoint presentation.

Other comments or suggestions: Including toxicology information in an event with broader reach helps introduce toxicology to students and faculty with low awareness. The cost-sharing was an added benefit.


Applicant:
John C. Lipscomb

Campus Visited:
St. John’s University

Affiliation:
on leave US EPA

Date of Visit:
5/2/2013

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
John C. Lipscomb
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:

Target Audience:  St. John’s 13th Annual ToxExpo: The Expo is a one day event to showcase toxicology on campus-wide basis. Participants include students in both the undergraduate (BS) program as well as MS and PhD toxicology students. The event is anticipated each year by faculty and students from multiple disciplines including pharmacology, toxicology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, environmental studies, and chemistry.

Presentation Format: St John’s promoted this event campus wide through all undergraduate and graduate programs. It offers a structured program of talks on different disciplines of Toxicology; Risk Assessment wasthe keynote address this year (my talk).

Description of the first talk or event: toured poster displays and interacted with several graduate students and an impressive number of interested and well-informed undergraduate students representing the fields of pharmacology, toxicology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, environmental studies, and chemistry. The remainder of the morning was devoted to career awareness activities, where I was one of three speakers giving a brief overview of their career history and descriptions of their present jobs.
# Attending:

Description of additional talks or events: Following a school-wide picnic luncheon, Ipresented a keynote address on the Application of Pharmacokinetic Information in Health Risk Assessment. Finally, Dr Lipscomb and Toxicology program faculty participated in a student-led presentation and discussion of a risk assessment project.

Most important outcomes of the visit: In the weeks after the event, I remained in contact with several students, sending them reference materials and answering additional questions on Toxicology and career choices.


Applicant:
Jessica Sapiro

Campus Visited:
Northern Arizona University (NAU)

Affiliation:
University of Arizona

Date of Visit:
9/5/2013

Amount Funded:
$460

Visitor(s):
Jessica Sapiro
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
30

Target Audience: Our target audience at NAU is biological science majors, chemistry majors, environmental science majors, and public health majors. Faculty from the departments were invited to attend the session at both institutions.

Presentation Format: I first gave a presentation on the field of Toxicology and career options beyond an undergraduate degree. Following, I led an interactive experiment on alcohol exposure affecting blackworm function. This experiment has been conducted several times in our outreach program and students have learned about the dose response relationship, routes of exposure, differences between acute and chronic toxicity, and various factors that can influence the effect of a chemical on living organisms.

How were students recruited for the event? Students were recruited to the event by flyers and emails to department chairs. In addition, students were provided with pizza as the sessions were over lunch.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? Mansel is available by email.

Description of the first talk or event: Two 75-minute sessions were held over the lunch hour to provide an additional option for students. The sessions covered both a PowerPoint presentation and a laboratory demonstration. In the PowerPoint, I used some of the SOT slides, slides from our outreach program, as well as my own. Approximately 30 students attended one of the two sessions. Prior to beginning the presentation, each student gave a short introduction of him/herself indicating their year and major. Ages ranged from freshman-seniors and a wide variety of majors attended. This was intentional to illustrate different fields that can incorporate Toxicology. I discussed my career path thus far and briefly described my dissertation research. The first section of the powerpoint was an introduction to Toxicology. Following, was information on different specialty areas, career opportunities, and the annual SOT meeting to be held in Phoenix. The powerpoint ended with general advice on what students should do as an undergraduate student to best prepare for an advanced degree and a career. The laboratory demonstration was exposing California blackworms to different concentrations of lab grade ethanol to illustrate dose and time principles.
# Attending: 30

Most important outcomes of the visit: The most important goal of the visit was to increase Toxicology awareness at a university that does not have Toxicology as a major. I encouraged participation throughout the presentation and some of the students actively engaged. Although a Toxicology major is not offered, some of the students had a basic knowledge through information they heard through media outlets and readings and asked questions. The majority of the students appeared attentive throughout the entire presentation (30-35 minutes) and many comments were made during the blackworms demonstration on the behavior and appearance. I would encourage future speakers to provide the students with their email address as for some students, this was their first time interacting with an advanced student in the field and some have emailed with additional questions including career and graduate school advice.

Aspects t you would change to improve the outcome: I would encourage future speakers to provide the students with their email address as for some students, this was their first time interacting with an advanced student in the field and some have emailed with additional questions including career and graduate school advice.

Materials used in the visit:  Arizona outreach presentation slides, SOT presentation slides, speaker’s slides, California Blackworms and lab grade ethanol, SOT brochures on careers and the annual meeting.


Applicant:
Joshua Chandler

Campus Visited:
Drury University

Affiliation:
University Colorado Denver

Date of Visit:
10/22/2013

Amount Funded:
$500

Visitor(s):
Joshua Chandler
Funded by:
Ed ToxScholar
Number Reached:
70–80

Target Audience: Undergraduate students of biology, chemistry, environmental science,
physics, math, computer science.

Presentation Format:  The visit included a formal research seminar, a joint meeting of several undergraduate science honors societies and interest groups, and a luncheon with students specifically interested in further studying toxicology from environmental science and other backgrounds.

How were students recruited for the event? Fliers were posted a week before, faculty encouraged their classes to go directly and scientific student organization leaders also promoted the event.

Any tips for making arrangements with the campus contact? Wendy Anderson is very responsive to email and easy to get in touch with.

Description of the first talk or event: Audience of about 50 students plus some faculty. This was a more structured talk to present basic research and its results from a relatively recent Drury grad (myself). I presented a couple of aims from my thesis research and their findings. Several students who know people affected by cystic fibrosis spoke to me afterward.
# Attending: 50

Description of additional talks or events: Later events were 20–30 people each, either small classes or later a luncheon format for student organizations and those currently involved in undergraduate research projects. Mostly talked about how to best identify good grad programs and apply to them and what to do in the mean time like summer internships in research areas. About a dozen students responded with obvious interest.
# Attending: 20–30 (several sessions)

Most important outcomes of the visit: Exchanged contact info with several students who can use me as a contact to help them get into a good toxicology program or similar (convinced several who are interested in biochemistry that toxicology could also be a good fit).

Aspects you would change to improve outcome: The only area I felt could have been improved was more participation by senior level students for the first research talk as they might have had a little more background to benefit from the material than the younger students.

Materials used in the visit:  My research talk was structured like a graduate level presentation using PowerPoint. I can share the slides if desired. The career path talks did not use printed material other than the SOT materials, if students wanted to take them, and were discussion based, i.e., after I had spoken for 10+ minutes about myself students raised their questions and concerns.

Other comments or suggestions: None at this time, this was a great opportunity and I believe that I may have helped push several students closer to consider basic research and toxicology as a career path.




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