Program Overview

This page and the Program Overview are meant to provide a quick glimpse at the schedule of sessions and events which will occur during the Virtual 2021 SOT Annual Meeting and ToxExpo. As information becomes available and activities are finalized, they will be added to this page. Full details and information on the sessions and events listed on this page are available in the Online Planner.

Please note that any events scheduled for Friday, March 12, or Saturday, March 13, are taking place during US Eastern Standard Time, UTC -5. Beginning Sunday, March 14, the official meeting time zone is US Eastern Daylight Time, UTC -4. Please consult the World Time Zone Map for further guidance regarding the time conversions.

Key:

IAT Innovations in Applied Toxicology   ITS Innovations in Toxicological Sciences


  

Friday, March 12

9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE

  • CE01 Chemical Probes: New Tools to Identify Molecular Targets

10:00 AM to 1:45 PM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE

  • CE05 Less Is More: Sustainable Product Development Requires More Toxicological Considerations

11:00 AM to 2:45 PM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES

  • CE02 Advances in Single Cell Genomic Analyses for Toxicological Testing
  • CE03 Applications of In Vitro and In Silico New Approach Methodologies for Predictive and Mechanistic Thyroid Toxicity Testing
  • CE04 Concepts and Approaches for Current and Future Metals Toxicological Research

3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATOR SPECIAL EVENT

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Undergraduate Toxicology Education Workshop

N. Mitchell

Facilitator: Nicollete Mitchell, Bates College, Lewiston, ME.

Sponsored by FUTURE Committee

Preregistration Required

The Society of Toxicology has a commitment to embracing diversity and optimizing inclusion. At the upcoming Virtual SOT Annual Meeting, we will be facilitating a discussion about diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) among toxicologists who interface with undergraduates in the classroom, lab, and workplace. The workshop will be facilitated by Nicollette Mitchell, Director of Equity and Inclusion Education at Bates College.

Following a brief introduction about the importance of DEI, participants will be assigned to smaller groups to discuss where they are situated in their institution, the resources of that institution, and their ability to create change (and perhaps what that change might look like) in the DEI space. At the end of those discussions, all participants will come back together to report out about these conversations. Participants will leave having thought about their own positionality within the DEI space and hearing about that of other educators and their institutions.


Saturday, March 13

2:30 PM to 3:45 PM

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

  • What Is Toxicology and Why Should I Care: Live Introduction to Toxicology Presentation and Q&A
    Preregistration Required; Undergraduates Only
    Hosted by: Committee on Diversity Initiatives (CDI)
    Read more

Monday, March 15

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

9:45 AM to 11:00 AM

OPENING PLENARY SESSION

Blending Art and Science to Master Science Communication

L. Lindenfeld

Speaker: Laura Lindenfeld, Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

In this keynote, Dr. Lindenfeld will introduce participants to the Alda Center’s unique approach to science communication. Building on the foundations of improvisational theater, which cultivates a stronger ability to relate and connect, the Alda Center leverages scientific research on science communication to empower scientists to connect with diverse audiences in clear and vivid ways.

11:00 AM to 3:00 PM

RESEARCH FUNDING INSIGHTS

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Environmental Influences on Placental Origins of Development
  • Impaired Brain Barrier Systems: Relationship to Chemical-Induced Neurotoxicities
  • Industrial Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Toxicology

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • A Future Framework for Application of In Vitro Metabolism and QIVIVE Models to Inform Risk Assessment
  • Chemical-Induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Mode of Action, Relevance, and Risk Assessment
  • Establishing Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Principles for Probiotics: More Than Just a Gut Check
  • Standardization of In Vitro Inhalation Exposure for Regulatory Acceptance
  • Using Human Genetics to Aid in Safety Assessment of Therapeutics ITS

2:45 PM to 4:05 PM

INFORMATIONAL SESSIONS

  • Turning Over a New Leaf: An Update on the Clinical Toxicology of Synthetic Cannabinoids
  • Understanding the Spread and Toxicological, Environmental, and Public Health Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the African Continent

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Tuesday, March 16

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

LEADING EDGE IN BASIC SCIENCE AWARD LECTURE

Toxicoepigenetics and the Use of piRNA for Precision Environmental Health Research

Lecturer: Dana C. Dolinoy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Toxicant exposures early in life adversely affect health outcomes in both animal models and humans, in part because of epigenetic mechanisms. Accumulating studies also indicate that exposures’ effect on the epigenome can be tissue and even cell specific. Yet toxicoepigenetic animal studies are often conducted with single tissues in bulk and/or limited epigenomic targets (e.g., DNA methylation). Additionally, epigenetic epidemiology analysis of toxicants is almost always restricted to biologically available, “surrogate” (e.g., blood) samples. Using a combination of toxicological and epidemiological approaches, the first of two overarching goals of this lecture is to advance the understanding of the effects of representative perinatal exposures on the epigenome and longitudinal health risks. Second, precision modification of the epigenome holds great promise for our ability to modify environmentally induced changes in gene expression, yet is currently out of reach using common techniques (drugs, transgenics, etc.). Until recently, it was widely believed that Piwi Like RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing (PIWIL) gene expression was confined to the germ line of animals and that neither PIWILs nor piRNAs were present or active in somatic tissues. Our research overturns this accepted knowledge by finding widespread PIWIL expression in multiple somatic tissues in mice and humans. Thus, we are using this class of RNA to develop technology to target specific genes and loci for stable, mitotically heritable silencing at predetermined genomic locations. The research expands the repertoire of epigenome editing tools resulting in therapeutics to treat a broad array of environmental and epigenetic diseases, including imprinted gene disorders and cancer.

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Developmental Toxicity Hazard Assessment without Animals: Pathways and Prospects IAT
  • From Inhaled Particles to Neurodegeneration and Toxicity: Evidence from Studies in Volunteers, Experimental Animals, and Cell-Based Systems
  • Novel Emerging Treatments for Acetaminophen Toxicity
  • Pairing Adverse Outcome Pathway Discovery with Advances in Gene Editing to Solve Toxicity Mechanisms

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • Improving Our Understanding of Toxicant Metabolism and Cytochrome P450s Using Novel Knockout Models and High-Throughput Methods
  • New Approach Methodologies for Exposure: Advancing Chemical Risk Assessment
  • Precision-Cut Lung Slices: A Versatile Tool for Pulmonary Toxicology

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Carcinogenicity
  • Epidemiology and Public Health
  • Mixtures

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Food Safety/Nutrition
  • Metals

2:45 PM to 3:15 PM

FEATURED SESSION

Meet the Director: A Conversation with Rick Woychik

R. Woychik

Speaker: Rick Woychik, NIEHS/NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC.

This important session will provide an informal venue for attendees to have a candid and open discussion with Rick Woychik, PhD, the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The 30-minute session will begin with a brief summary of the leadership values that Dr. Woychik brings to the position, and the remainder of the session will be devoted to a question-and-answer format concerning scientific directions and priorities for NIEHS, including funding priorities and outlooks and training opportunities.

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSION

  • Evolving Technologies for Determination of Biotherapeutic Specificity

WORKSHOP SESSION

  • The Methodological Road toward Single Cell High-Throughput Transcriptomics (scHTTr) IAT

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Wednesday, March 17

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:15 AM

SOT/EUROTOX DEBATE

Individualized Toxicity Is the Future of Risk Assessment

S. Pettit A. Boobis

SOT Debater: Syril D. Pettit, HESI, Washington, DC.
EUROTOX Debater: Alan R. Boobis, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.

Each year, the SOT Annual Meeting includes a debate in which leading toxicologists advocate opposing sides of an issue of significant toxicological importance. The debate continues a tradition that originated in the early 1990s. This year, the debaters will address the proposition “individualized toxicity is the future of risk assessment.” As toxicologists, we seek to define safe operating parameters for the use of a substance in a population. The opportunity to use “real-world evidence” and personal data collection devices (human biomonitoring) to gather information on toxicity from individuals and small populations allows us to envision new ways to refine these parameters as they relate to individuals. Is the future of toxicology and risk assessment headed toward a paradigm that must include approaches for patients/individuals at a public health–protection scale? If so, is it possible (or even desirable) to view risk of small groups of individuals based on discrete risk factors? Can adverse outcome assessments for groups be improved by this approach? Can recent developments in machine learning and other computational methods be applied in toxicology as they are being applied in precision medicine? Does surveillance of a patient’s response via personalized adverse effect monitoring provide a means to qualify the exposure-response relationship that can be tailored to each patient? Would better profiling be helpful to avoid lethal errors? Does an integrated exposure reduce the number of assumptions that need to be made when estimating exposure and thus help reduce the uncertainties in exposure science? Can we address the ethical and political aspects of its application? In addition to inclusion as a Featured Session at this meeting, this debate will again take place (with the debaters taking the reverse positions) in Copenhagen, Denmark, during the EUROTOX 2021 congress, September 26–29, 2021.

11:00 AM to 4:00 PM

RESEARCH FUNDING INSIGHTS

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Biotransformation/Cytochrome P450
  • Kidney
  • Liver: In Vitro
  • Liver: In Vivo

11:30 AM to 2:15 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Challenges and New Approaches in Characterizing Toxicity within the Military
  • Identifying and Communicating Adverse Neurological Outcomes from Parental Cannabis Use
  • It Is Not Just Air: Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution, Diagnostic Tools, and Evaluation of Health Effects
  • Mind the Gap: Finding Practical Ways to Fast-Track the Future of Animal-Free Toxicology Testing
  • Opportunities and Challenges in Utilization of Toxicokinetic Data in Dose-Level Selection for Repeated-Dose Toxicity Studies
  • Testing the Waters: How the Zebrafish, Xenopus, and Medaka Models Are Advancing Our Understanding of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity
  • The Power of Integrating Computational Toxicology with Multiparametric In Vitro Assay Systems

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Nanotoxicology: In Vitro
  • Nanotoxicology: In Vivo
  • Nanotoxicology: Methodologies and Assessments
  • Systems Biology

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Across the Life Span: Emerging Mechanisms of Prenatal and Transgenerational Toxicity
  • Nonclinical Safety Toxicology Strategies for the Development of Novel Ocular Biotherapeutics

2:45 PM to 4:05 PM

EDUCATION-CAREER DEVELOPMENT SESSION

  • Innovation in Toxicology Training during Summer Undergraduate Internships

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Thursday, March 18

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

DISTINGUISHED TOXICOLOGY SCHOLAR AWARD LECTURE

Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Neurodegenerative Diseases

Lecturer: Deborah Cory-Slechta, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

Epidemiological evidence links air pollution (AP) to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) and neurodegenerative diseases (NDGDs). Our studies of inhalation exposures of mice to concentrated ambient ultrafine particles (CAPS) provide biological plausibility for these associations and have begun to examine specific AP contaminants that may underlie these effects. Early postnatal (human third-trimester brain equivalent) CAPS inhalation produced persistent male-biased neuropathological and behavioral features of NDDs, while females showed latent neurotoxicity. Gestational CAPS exposures produced similar neuropathology across sexes, but also increased total brain levels of amyloid and tau in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of females, features of NDGDs. Cumulative neurotoxicity was found following early postnatal + subsequent adult CAPS exposures. Postnatal CAPS exposures markedly elevated brain levels of redox active metals, including Fe and Cu, consistent with brain metal dyshomeostasis, a known feature/mechanism of NDGDs, suggesting oxidative stress/ferroptotic cell death mechanisms. Fe nanoparticle inhalation reproduced specific neuropathology of CAPS in both sexes, and in females, increased total tau, and blunted the time-related increase in numbers of nucleus accumbens neurons. With respect to organic AP contaminants, subchronic inhalation of paraquat, an herbicide linked to Parkinson’s disease (PD), produced significant brain uptake and persistent male-specific deficits in motor function, olfactory discrimination, and midbrain dopamine loss, characteristic PD features. AP with its associated contaminants may be a far-reaching risk factor for NDDs and NDGDs, underscoring the urgent need for additional inhalation models of sex-based critical periods of vulnerability and associated mechanisms.

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Challenges and Opportunities in Applying Quantitative and Translational Systems Toxicology Models to Drug Safety Testing ITS
  • Closing the Data Gap: Assessing Population Variability Using Next-Generation Tools in Toxicology
  • Hereditary Disorders of Manganese Metabolism: Mechanisms, Clinical Presentation, and Neurotoxicity ITS

11:15 AM to 12:45 PM

WORKSHOP SESSION

  • Are Aircraft Cabin Fume Releases a Cause for Toxicological Concern?

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • Navigating Your Health and Wellness through Graduate School and Early Careers
  • New Approach Methods for Cancer Risk Assessment
  • The Need for Protocol Harmonization in the Advancement of Zebrafish as a Model for Toxicological Screening: Global Perspectives and Recent Advancements

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Cardiovascular Toxicology/Hemodynamics
  • Chemical Threats and Bioterrorism
  • Ocular Toxicology

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Air Pollution Toxicology I
  • Air Pollution Toxicology II
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Epigenetics
  • Regulation/Policy

2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

MERIT AWARD LECTURE

Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms of Cannabinoid-Mediated Immune Modulation and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 as a Putative Therapeutic Target

N. Kaminski

Lecturer: Norbert E. Kaminski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

The term cannabinoid encompasses a broad family of molecules, including plant (cannabis)–derived, synthetic, and endogenous compounds possessing diverse biological activities. Indeed, cannabis alone possesses over 100 structurally related cannabinoids, most of which have yet to be studied to any extent. The majority of attention during the past 50 years has focused on the primary psychotropic constituent in cannabis, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and very recently cannabidiol, both of which can influence immune function. A focus of the Kaminski laboratory has been on defining the profile of immune activity by cannabinoids and elucidating the molecular mechanisms mediating cannabinoid immune modulation. A significant advancement in the field came with the identification and cloning of two G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, and the establishment of their expression on leukocytes. Identification of cannabinoid receptors quickly led to the discovery of endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, raising questions concerning their physiological role, including in immune regulation. An important backdrop to cannabinoid research has been the prevalence of cannabis use, with an estimated 37 million adult users in the US and likely increasing with recent trends toward legalization of recreational consumption. Likewise, medical use of cannabis and cannabidiol has also increased significantly, with many questions about the benefits remaining unanswered. Finally, expression of cannabinoid receptors within the immune system, coupled with the absence of CB2 within the CNS, provides a putative drug target for cannabinoid-mediated immune modulation devoid of psychotropic activity. This presentation will discuss the molecular mechanisms by which cannabinoids modulate the immune system, as well as putative health implications and CB2 as a putative therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Dr. Kaminski was the recipient of the SOT Merit Award in 2020.

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

WORKSHOP SESSION

  • Revising Biology: Alternative Splicing in Toxicology ITS

2:45 PM to 4:05 PM

ROUNDTABLE SESSION

  • The Future of Uncertainty Factors with In Vitro Studies Using Human Cells

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Friday, March 19

9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE

  • CE06 Insider Secrets for Design and Analysis of Defined-Mixture Experiments

11:00 AM to 2:45 PM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES

  • CE07 Development, Toxicology, and Pathology of the Female Reproductive Tract: Interpretation of Findings from the Pathologist and Regulatory Perspectives
  • CE08 Guidelines for Developing and Implementing Organ-on-a-Chip/Microphysiological Systems for Toxicity Evaluation of Drug Candidates in Drug Development
  • CE09 Navigating New Modalities: A Preclinical Roadmap for Developing Novel Oligonucleotide Safety Strategy
  • CE10 Rapid Chemical Assessment Using Open Computational Methods

Saturday, March 20

12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

  • Ins and Outs of Graduate School in Toxicology: Insights into Admissions, Training, and Finding Success
    Preregistration Required; Undergraduates Only
    Hosted by: Committee on Diversity Initiatives (CDI)
    Read more

3:00 PM to 4:15 PM

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

  • Interactive Case Study for Undergraduate Students: Metal Levels in Whales from the Gulf of Maine: A One Environmental Health Approach
    Preregistration Required; Undergraduates Only
    Hosted by: Committee on Diversity Initiatives (CDI)
    Read more

Monday, March 22

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

EUROTOX BO HOLMSTEDT MEMORIAL AWARD LECTURE

Understanding Three Fundamental Quantitative Principles Is a Prerequisite for Improving Toxicological Science and Risk Assessment

W. Slob

Lecturer: Wout Slob, Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu (RIVM), Netherlands.

Wout Slob, PhD, studied biology at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, with theoretical biology as his main subject. He obtained his PhD in 1987 with work on applying statistics in biological research, including log transformation and power analysis. Dr. Slob worked at RIVM from 1986 to 1995 as a consulting statistician. During that period, he gradually became more interested in toxicology and risk assessment. From 1996, he specialized in methods for risk assessment of substances, including dose-response modeling, exposure modeling, probabilistic risk analysis, and toxicokinetic modeling. As an expert in these quantitative methods, he played an important role in many international committees. Dr. Slob developed a software program for analyzing dose-response data (PROAST). This is used a lot, nationally and internationally, in the context of risk assessment as well as in the context of scientific research in general. From 2000 to 2010, Dr. Slob also was appointed as a professor for quantitative risk assessment at the Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS) of Universiteit Utrecht.

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSION

  • Applications of Novel High-Throughput Approaches for Mechanism-Based Chemical Safety Assessment

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • New Approaches for the Identification and Evaluation of Chemical Respiratory Sensitizers
  • Tackling the Potential Human Health Impacts of Microplastics and Nanoplastics: Challenges for Toxicologists in the Assessment of Real-World Complex Mixtures
  • Thresholds of Toxicological Concern: Reassessing the Basis and Expanding the Horizon

PLATFORM SESSION

  • Pharmaceutical Safety Assessment: Spotlight

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Biological Modeling
  • Endocrine Toxicology
  • Immunotoxicity
  • Neurotoxicity: Developmental
  • Neurotoxicity: General
  • Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology I

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Bioinformatics
  • Computational Toxicology I
  • Risk Assessment
  • Tobacco and ENDS Toxicology

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

IN VITRO TOXICOLOGY LECTURE FOR STUDENTS

Computational Intelligence: Building “Smart Models” for Toxicology in the Era of Big Data

Lecturer: Thomas Knudsen, US EPA/NCCT, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Hosted by: Education and Career Development Committee

Preregistration Required

The goal of the In Vitro Toxicology Lecture series is to feature important research using in vitro and alternative techniques to study basic mechanisms and to develop test methods aimed at replacing animal use whenever feasible. Undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and recipients of Colgate-Palmolive awards are among the guests at this event. The speaker will make a short presentation which is the basis for a case study discussion in breakout rooms.

Technologies used by toxicologists, and the biological questions we ask, have become increasingly sophisticated with the integration of data science and computational intelligence. Computer models allow us to mine big-data and synthesize important concepts that can be applied to biologically-complex systems. To operationalize complex data for toxicological evaluation, information must be collected, organized, and assimilated into models that bridge different levels of biological organization. By reconstructing biological tissues in silico into simulated “virtual tissues,” we can demonstrate how dynamic changes occur in response to a particular stimuli such as biomolecular lesions introduced from real world data. This has been captured for several examples in embryo development with data from ToxCast or literature, rendering where, when, and how a particular lesion might lead to an adverse outcome facilitating mechanistic hypothesis generation and predictive toxicology. Discussion will focus on how many models are needed, how smart models must be to support decision-making in the animal-free (3Rs) zone, and practical considerations for technology development, application, and training for predictive toxicology. Disclaimer: does not reflect EPA policy.

2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

TRANSLATIONAL IMPACT AWARD LECTURE

The Placenta: A Recorder and Transducer of Environmental Toxics

Lecturer: Rebecca Fry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

The placenta serves as a temporary organ that is critical for a healthy pregnancy as well as proper fetal development. Numerous environmental toxicants can impact the development and proper functioning of the placenta. The placenta, in turn, can transduce these toxicant-induced signals to the fetus. This lecture will discuss how environmental chemicals—including, but not limited to, inorganic arsenic, cadmium, and perflouralkyl substances—impact cellular signaling within the placenta and influence both early and later-in-life health outcomes. Transdisciplinary approaches that include in vitro and in vivo model systems, as well as human population-based studies, have been key to scientific discovery. These approaches have been essential to identify exposure-outcome associations and the biological mechanisms underlying placental toxicity. This research has elucidated the complex mechanisms through which environmental contaminants alter the placenta, and thus drive pregnancy complications, and later-in-life offspring development. Solution-oriented research focused on disease prevention builds upon this knowledge base.

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

WORKSHOP SESSION

  • The Community Exposome: Effects of Environmental Contamination on Health Disparities and Marginalized Populations through the Lens of a Toxicologist

2:45 PM to 4:05 PM

INFORMATIONAL SESSION

  • Toxicology for Chemists: Preparing Chemists to Design Safer Products through Smarter Molecular Design

4:30 PM to 6:30 PM

TOX SHOWDOWN

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Tuesday, March 23

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

PLENARY KEYNOTE MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (MRC) LECTURE

Using Luciferase-Based Mouse Reporter Lines to Detect and Track Epigenetic Changes Induced by Environmental Exposures

A. Fisher

Lecturer: Dame Amanda Fisher, MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, United Kingdom.

Professor Dame Amanda Fisher has contributed to many areas of biology, including the molecular discovery of HIV and the impact of chromatin and nuclear location for gene expression. Imprinted genes are epigenetically regulated and show parent of origin-specific expression. These genes have important roles in embryonic growth and metabolism, and their deregulation impacts upon postnatal metabolism and behavior, as well as susceptibility to disease. We recently created a series of luciferase reporter mice that enable imprinted gene expression to be sensitively imaged throughout development in vivo and across successive generations of animals. Our experiments have shown that environmental factors encountered in utero can disrupt epigenetic control within developing embryos and permanently alter the expression of imprinted alleles in offspring. For example, transient exposure to chromatin-modifying drugs such as TSA or 5’Azacytidine provoke the misexpression of paternally inherited (and normally silent) Cdkn1c alleles. In utero exposure to a low-protein maternal diet also induces paternal Cdkn1c re-expression, which is not reversed when offspring resume a normal diet. In a second series of experiments, we have shown that in utero exposure to high-fat maternal diet provokes the de-repression of a different (maternally silenced) imprinted gene, Dlk1. Remarkably, our data indicate that the epigenetic impact of this exposure remains visible across three generations of offspring. These results illustrate how luciferase-based reporter mice can be used to uncover exposures that alter the epigenetic landscape, examine how this occurs, and explore specific vulnerabilities of the developing embryo.

11:00 AM to 4:00 PM

RESEARCH FUNDING INSIGHTS

11:15 AM to 2:00 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSION

  • Opportunities for Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Neurons in In Vitro Neurotoxicity Safety Testing

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • Bile Acids Profiling as Biomarkers for Hepatobiliary Toxicity and Disease
  • Molecular-Based Points of Departure as the New Basis for Chemical Risk Assessment: Are We Ready?
  • Paving the Way for Greater Data Sharing to Advance Biomarker and Drug Development: Industry, Academia, and Regulatory Insights

INFORMATIONAL SESSION

  • Strategies to Increase Global Awareness of Toxicology: Focus on Developing Countries

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Exposure Assessment/Biomonitoring
  • Neurodegenerative Disease
  • PFAS
  • POPs
  • Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology II
  • Safety Evaluation of Nonpharmaceutical Products

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Alternatives to Mammalian Models I
  • Cell Death Mechanisms
  • Computational Toxicology II
  • DNA Damage and Repair
  • Respiratory Toxicology
  • Skin and Dermal Toxicity

2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

MERIT AWARD LECTURE

The Exciting Challenge of Working in Regulatory Toxicology

Lecturer: Rogene Henderson, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM.

The importance of using regulations to keep our air clean is relevant for two major reasons: to protect the health of all species and to protect the health of our planet. This lecture will address some of the challenges associated with working in this field through the lens of a prodigious career in regulatory toxicology. Dr. Henderson will discuss her early education, which included a double major in chemistry and biology as well as a double minor in German and mathematics. She will then discuss her one-year studies in Munich, Germany, on a Fulbright Scholarship and her subsequent return on a fellowship to perform a graduate study in chemistry at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. She then will speak about her early career, when after earning a PhD in chemistry, Dr. Henderson joined the newly established Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute under Dr. Roger O. McClellan. She will present on her research, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, on the toxicokinetics of inhaled xenobiotics, which led to the development of novel biomarkers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and contributed to the modern field of inhalation toxicology. Dr. Henderson also will touch on how from this basic research, she published over 250 scientific communications, including review articles, chapters, and books, and served on numerous Editorial Boards and study sections. Dr. Henderson will then discuss her experiences as a member and later Chair of the US Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, where she pushed for reasonable regulations of air pollutants and additionally contributed to the World Health Organization’s guidelines for air quality. This lecture will include a discussion of some of the challenges Dr. Henderson faced in the leadership roles she held in regulatory agencies. Dr. Henderson is the 2021 recipient of the SOT Merit Award.

2:45 PM to 4:15 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSION

  • SETAC-SOT Session: Environmental Risk Assessment of PFAS

2:45 PM to 4:05 PM

INFORMATIONAL SESSION

  • Safety Assessment of Devices Used in Assisted Reproduction Technology: Mouse Embryo Assay

2:45 PM to 4:00 PM

PLATFORM SESSION

  • Biological Models for In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Wednesday, March 24

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

STUDENT AND POSTDOC EVENT

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

FEATURED SESSION

A Career in Advancing the Field of Toxicology: A Tribute to Linda S. Birnbaum

M. J. DeVito M. van den Berg H.S. Fenton
R. Woychik L. C. Haw

Speakers: Michael J. DeVito, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC; Martin van den Berg, Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; Suzanne E. Fenton, NIEHS/NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC; Rick Woychik, NIEHS/NTP, Research Triangle Park, NC; and Laurie C. Haws, ToxStrategies Inc., Austin, TX.

Linda S. Birnbaum, PhD, DABT, ATS, has been a visionary making lasting contributions to the science of toxicology through both her own research and her advocacy of research. She also has promoted the application of toxicology research to solving significant public health problems, making the relevance of our science obvious. SOT is marking the occasion of her retirement as National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Director with a session that pays tribute to her long career in research and public service. Dr. Birnbaum made seminal contributions in research on the toxicity of dioxins, among the most potent small molecule toxicants. Her research into endocrine disrupters increased our understanding of the range of outcomes that can be attributed to these agents and highlighted the significance of early-life exposures in chronic diseases. As a leader of programs at the US Environmental Protection Agency and NIEHS, Dr. Birnbaum set strategic directions that increased the relevance of toxicology research in public health decision-making and increased the stature of the field among the life sciences community. Finally, Dr. Birnbaum has served as a mentor for numerous women in science. Each of these areas of contribution will be discussed during the session.

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Alternatives to Mammalian Models II
  • Biomarkers
  • Clinical and Translational Toxicology
  • COVID-19 Issues
  • Medical Devices
  • Stem Cell Biology and Toxicology

11:45 AM to 2:30 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Application of Computational Genomic Approaches to Address Toxicity Mechanisms and Prediction
  • Botanical Mixtures: Predictive Approaches to Evaluating Pregnancy, and Reproductive and Developmental Health

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • Applicability Domains and Future of Nonanimal Tests for Skin Sensitization
  • The Scientific Challenges in Regulating Organohalogen Flame Retardants (OFRs) as a Class in Consumer Products

11:45 AM to 1:30 PM

PLATFORM SESSION

  • Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Disposition/Pharmacokinetics
  • Education, Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues
  • Neurotoxicity: Metals
  • Neurotoxicity: Pesticides
  • Pesticides
  • Safety Assessment: Pharmaceutical—Drug Discovery

3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

SOT ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING

  • SOT members are encouraged to attend.

5:30 PM to 8:15 PM

SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY AND JAPANESE SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

Oxidative Stress in Multiple Manifestations of Toxicity

Y. Kumagai Y. Saito
A. Timme-Laragy D. Jones

JSOT Speaker: Yoshito Kumagai, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
JSOT Speaker: Yoshiro Saito, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.
SOT Speaker: Alicia R. Timme-Laragy, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA.
SOT Speaker: Dean P. Jones, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

SOT and the Japanese Society of Toxicology (JSOT) are delighted to jointly sponsor a Symposium on a topic of mutual interest: oxidative stress in multiple manifestations of toxicity. Each society has selected from among its membership leaders in the field to provide their perspectives on recent advances in this area. The Symposium will highlight advances in research on the role of oxidative stress in adverse outcomes. Oxidative stress occurs when the products of oxidative processes exceed the cell’s capacity to handle them. The resulting imbalance causes damage to macromolecules, leading to cellular damage and eventually to a variety of disease states. The SOT/JSOT Symposium will explore multiple mechanisms and outcomes of oxidative stress.

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

4:30 PM to 5:30 PM

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

  • Toxicology Career Roundtables
    Preregistration Required; Undergraduates Only
    Hosted by: Faculty United for Toxicology Undergraduate Recruitment and Education (FUTURE) Committee
    Read more

Thursday, March 25

8:30 AM to 10:00 AM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

NETWORKING LOUNGES

  • Enter these spaces to chat with other attendees, attend short talks, or enter private rooms for short meetings.

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM

SPECIAL EVENT

SOT Awards and Honors Recognition

Join the Awards Committee, in conjunction with the SOT leadership, as distinguished scientists are honored for cutting-edge and novel research.

Also, please note that the 2021 SOT Award recipients will be recognized through a full, produced awards presentation that will be made available on March 14 and will continue to be accessible for viewing throughout the meeting and onward.

View the SOT Awards Program.

11:00 AM to 4:00 PM

RESEARCH FUNDING INSIGHTS

11:15 AM to 1:00 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Animal Models
  • Autoimmunity/Hypersensitivity
  • Inflammation
  • Natural Products
  • Oxidative Injury and Redox Biology
  • Receptors

11:30 AM to 1:30 PM

HOT TOPIC FEATURED SESSION

COVID-19 Therapeutics and Vaccines: A Race to Save Lives

R. M. Bannister M. Liu C. M. Rohde
A. L. Motter J. Dubinion C. Wrzesinski

Chair(s): Marie C. Fortin, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc., Philadelphia, PA; and Ilona G. Bebenek, US FDA, Silver Spring, MD.

Speakers: Roy M. Bannister, Gilead Pharmaceuticals Inc., Foster City, CA; Matt Liu, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., Tarrytown, NY; Cynthia M. Rohde, Pfizer Inc., Pearl River, NY; Arianne L. Motter, US FDA/CDER, Silver Spring, MD; John Dubinion, US FDA/CDER, Silver Spring, MD; and Claudia Wrzesinski, US FDA/OVRR, Silver Spring, MD.

COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019), the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2), is a public health emergency. Initially identified in China in late December 2019, forensic evidence revealed that the virus was in fact circulating in other regions as early as October 2019 and reached the United States at some point in late 2019. Since its emergence, scientists have been at the forefront of many efforts to fight this virus: public health measures to “flatten the curve,” vaccines to help achieve herd immunity, and therapeutic approaches to treat those who have fallen sick. As our understanding of COVID-19 and its health effects has improved, companies and agencies worldwide have worked hand-in-hand to identify therapeutic approaches and fast-track clinical trials and pathways to emergency use and approvals, in order to reduce time to recovery, improve survival, and mitigate long-term health consequences. In this session, the development of three products that are—at the time of writing of this abstract—either approved or authorized for emergency use, VEKLURY® (remdesivir, direct acting antiviral from Gilead), casirivimab and imdevimab (antibody cocktail from Regeneron), and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, will be discussed. The pharmacology and mode of action, nonclinical development, and regulatory development pathways for these therapeutics will be covered to the extent possible. Perspectives concerning the development of early- and late-stage drug development during this health crisis also will be provided from the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA).

11:30 AM to 2:15 PM

SYMPOSIUM SESSIONS

  • Controlling the Message: Safely Navigating the Development of Novel Oligonucleotide Therapeutics
  • From Conception to Cane: Unique Life-Stage Considerations for Reproductive Toxicity

WORKSHOP SESSIONS

  • Cannabidiol 2021: Science, Safety, and Societal Issues IAT
  • Regulatory Learnings from the EU Flagship Nonanimal Toxicology Project, EU-ToxRisk

1:00 PM to 2:45 PM

POSTER SESSIONS

  • Emerging Technologies
  • Safety Assessment: Pharmaceutical—Drug Development

2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

  • Undergraduate Networking with Graduate Students
    Preregistration Required; Undergraduates Only
    Hosted by: Faculty United for Toxicology Undergraduate Recruitment and Education (FUTURE) Committee
    Read more

4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

TOXEXPO EXHIBITS

  • Visit the Virtual Exhibit Hall for product, service, and career insights.

Friday, March 26

11:00 AM to 2:45 PM

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES

  • CE11 Establishing Confidence in Organ-on-a-Chip Systems for Toxicity Testing: Lung-on-a-Chip as an Example
  • CE12 Risk Assessment, DART, and Endocrine Disruption: A World View
  • CE13 Timing Is Everything: Role of Aging in Immune Responses and Toxicological Implications
  • CE14 Understanding Tox21/ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data and Applications to Modeling