Historical Archive of Endowment Fund Award Recipients

The SOT Endowment Fund is a family of funds that support SOT programs and members. Many of the funds sponsor awards designed to encourage, assist, and highlight toxicology research and toxicologists.

Andersen/Clewell Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Qiran Chen
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD Candidate
Institution/Affiliation: Indiana University Bloomington

Ms. Chen was extremely honored to have been recognized. This award is particularly meaningful to her because it boosts her confidence and inspires her to achieve her career goals. It was also her pleasure to have such an opportunity to communicate with intelligent scholars in RASS. 

Ms. Chen's work focuses on the improvement of risk assessment through innovative statistical and analytical methodologies. The long-term goal of this research is develop a methodological framework that integrates mechanistic plausibility, experimental data, and uncertainty and variability into dose-response analysis in support of probabilistic carcinogen risk assessment. Her current study is to establish a new approach for dose-response assessment for carcinogens with the quantitative information of its mode of action.

Andersen/Clewell Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Wei-Chun Chou
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine at Kansas State University

Dr. Chou felt very honored and appreciated receiving this prestigious award, which raised his confidence and inspiration to chase his dream of seeking knowledge. This award has not only given a positive impact on him but also highly recognized his research. Dr. Chou feels his future academic journey will begin with this single step. In this study, Dr. Chou developed and validated a robust PBPK model in four species (mice, rats, monkeys, and humans). He used an advanced Bayesian analysis with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation to optimize parameter estimates and to characterize the parameter uncertainty across all species. This work will help fill the gap in the derivation of human health-based guidance value for PFOS extrapolation from animal studies. Another unique aspect of his work is that he will open all model code to ensure his work is of high scientific quality, rigorous, and reproducible. In the future, he will apply this method and model to other other perfluoroalkyl substances if data available.

Andersen/Clewell Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Yi-Hsien Cheng
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine (ICCM), Kansas State University

Dr. Cheng was really excited and grateful when she was informed she was a recipient of this award. She was honored by the chance to get to know and be recognized by scientists sharing similar research interests and by scientists from various research fields as well. Her career goal is to become an independent investigator in academia, research institute, or industry. Recognition from this award will greatly help her pursue excellence in future research and to achieve her career goals.

Dr. Cheng's research is related to construct physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict external-to-internal dosimetry of nanomaterials in target tissue/organ and to conduct probabilistic risk assessments with anticipation to gain further insights into the in vivo pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and risk of nanomaterials. Details of the awarded study: She and her team conducted an integrated and probabilistic risk assessment of AuNPs based on published in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies coupled to a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Specifically, dose-response relationships were characterized based on cell viability assays in various human cell types. A previously developed and validated human PBPK model for AuNPs was applied to quantify internal concentrations in liver, kidney, skin and venous plasma. By applying a Bayesian-based probabilistic risk assessment approach incorporating Monte Carlo simulation, probable human cell death fractions were characterized. Additionally, she and her team implemented in vitro to in vivo and animal-to-human extrapolation approaches to independently estimate external exposure levels of AuNPs that caused minimal toxicity. The analyses conducted provide insights into safety evaluation, risk prediction, and point of departure estimation of AuNP exposure for humans and illustrate an approach that could be applied to other NPs when sufficient data are available.

Angelo Furgiuele Young Investigator Technology Award Fund

Recipient: Joshua Robinson
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Dr. Robinson and his group is extremely excited and thankful to receive this award! These funds will enable his team to purchase equipment needed to establish the rodent whole embryo culture (WEC) model system in their laboratory. This ex vivo model enables the close examination of environmental toxicants on neurulation and early organogenesis. They expect that the development of the WEC in his group will greatly push their research agenda forward to understand the adverse developmental consequences linked to environmental exposures during pregnancy. Furthermore, this research will encourage collaborations between his lab and other investigators focused in the areas of embryology, toxicology, pharmacology, and molecular/cellular biology.

His group is interested in the links between environmental exposures which occur during pregnancy and developmental disease.  They use a combination of in-vitro model systems and genomic-based approaches to study potential interactions. They are deeply interested in specific classes of chemicals, e.g., flame retardants, phthalates, pesticides, which are known to be present in the developing embryo/fetus, which may produce developmental toxicity in utero. This award will help fund the development of a model, i.e., rodent whole embryo culture (WEC) model, in their laboratory, which enables close examination of environmental interactions during sensitive periods of early embryonic development.

 

Angelo Furgiuele Young Investigator Technology Award Fund

Recipient: Katherine (Katie) O'Shaughnessy
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: B.A. Biology, Ph.D. Genetics and Genomics
Institution/Affiliation: ORISE Postdoctoral Fellow, US Environmental Protection Agency

Dr. O'Shaughnessy was honored and excited to receive the Angelo Furgiuele Young Investigator Award! As a young postdoctoral scientist, it is daunting to think about finding a permanent position, as well as setting up a successful laboratory. Especially because of her use of molecular and cellular biology tools, her work can be costly. Since receiving this award, she is more encouraged to continue pursuing her professional goals. She will be using this award to purchase Nikon microscopy imaging software (Nis-Elements), which is fully equipped for both light and fluorescence analysis, cell counting, volume rendering and much more! This purchase not only provides flexibility to perform many different experiments through one package, but also includes a lifetime of training from Nikon, and the ability to "drive" a microscope in the future. She cannot wait to apply this cutting edge software across many different types of research projects.

Dr. O'Shaughnessy studies how changes in thyroid hormones (THs) during development alters brain structure and function. This relationship is of great interest as the brain needs THs to develop normally; however, there are chemicals in the environment that can change the way THs are made and/or function. Dr. O'Shaughnessy works to understand this interplay, in order to determine the risk of chemical exposures during pregnancy and postnatal development. Specifically, she has found that even mild levels of TH detriment during development can cause alterations in progenitor cells of the brain. Interestingly, these significant cellular changes are difficult to quantify without sensitive metrics like quantitative gene expression analyses and confocal microscopy. In the future, she hopes to continue pursuing how endocrine disruption changes the brain as a principle investigator.

Angelo Furgiuele Young Investigator Technology Award Fund

Recipient: Janet Sangodele
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Federal University of Technology Akure Nigeria

Reproductive toxicity is a hazard that is often associated with some chemical substances that interfere in some way with normal reproduction. Ms. Sangodele's research focuses on toxic effects of some selected environmental and occupational toxicants on key aspects of male reproduction, oxidative stress and fertility. The overall goal of her research is to evaluate the toxic effects and elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of oral and dermal exposure of toxicants and better understand the toxicity in animal models. However, the knowledge of mechanisms underlying the effects of toxicants by oral and dermal exposure is an important way of protecting people exposed to toxicants, thereby reducing the health implications of toxicants exposure and providing means to eradicate the toxic effects of toxicants that can affect reproduction and influence fertility.

Boehringer Ingelheim Biotherapeutic Safety Excellence Fund

Recipient: Frances  Shaffo
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Dr. Shaffo was very honored to be the second awardee of the BI Biotherapeutic Safety Excellence award. She feels this is a wonderful award that will help trainees take part in additional opportunities outside of SOT, which for her will hopefully involve traveling to the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapies annual meeting. She feels this will greatly complement her involvement in SOT and further her growth as a toxicologist in the exciting field of gene therapy. 

Dr. Shaffo works on pre-clinical development of novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapies for rare neurological diseases. The specific research for which this award was bestowed was on the development and safety profile of a gene therapy for SLC6A1 related disorder, which causes epilepsy and intellectual disability.   

Boehringer Ingelheim Biotherapeutic Safety Excellence Fund

Recipient: Ekram Ahmed Chowdhury
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

The award has been very helpful for Mr. Chowdhury in pursuing training related to antibody pharmacokinetics/toxicokinetics, which he is planning to utilize in his research work for modeling and simulation in the near future.

His research interests include targeted delivery of oligonucleotides to the brain using non-viral vector-polymer conjugates, LC-MS/MS based method development and validation of small molecules and peptides, novel blood-brain barrier permeability markers, preclinical pharmacokinetics of small molecules, and radiolabeled proteins/antibodies. Mr. Chowdhury is developing an antibody mediated targeted delivery system for oligonucleotides to the brain in a preclinical ischemic stroke model (MCAO) in mice. For this study, he has developed a library of non-viral vector-polymer conjugates having low toxicity that are linked to transferrin receptor antibody (8D3) or TCR mimic antibodies (RL6A/RL21A). Currently the blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a major hurdle in getting large molecules such as oligonucleotides to the target site for treating ischemic stroke. Even though there are several preclinical studies showing positive outcomes with microRNAs, all of these studies used intracerebroventricular injections for delivering the oligonucleotides to the target site. Mr. Chowdhury's strategy utilizes receptor mediated transcytosis in getting the oligonucleotides across the BBB. He believes his novel targeted delivery system would be a one-size-fits-all model for oligonucleotides which may revolutionize treatment options in the near future for not only ischemic stroke but also other neurological disorders in general.

Bruce A. Fowler Metals Endowment Fund

Recipient: Dilshan  Harichandra
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Covance Laboratories US

Dr. Harichandra was honored and very excited to receive this prestigious award. Importantly, this award shows the positive impact that he made in metal toxicology research and gave visibility to his goal of understanding the role biological mechanisms underlying the propagation of the disease with respect to environmental neurotoxic stress.

Dr. Harischandra's research focused on the role of environmental neurotoxicant manganese and in the pathogenesis of Parkinsonism. This award relates to his contributions in decoding contradictory characteristics of the α-synuclein protein, where it presents neuroprotective effects under acute manganese exposures and neurodegenerative responses at chronic exposure conditions. Dr. Harischandra's research shown chronic manganese exposure promotes the aggregation and prion-like cell-to-cell exosomal transmission of α-synuclein resulting in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses in experimental models of Parkinsonism. His future research goals include evaluating serum exosome in a large cohort of human samples from subjects that expose to manages through occupational exposure and establish an exosome-based biomarker for Parkinsonism and related disorders.

Bruce A. Fowler Metals Endowment Fund

Recipient: Somshuvra Mukhopadhyay
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Mukhopadhyay felt honored to be nominated by his senior colleagues for this prestigious award, and was delighted to learn that he received it. The award will increase visibility of his work in the toxicology and metal biology communities and help in establishing new collaborations and interactions. 

The goal of Dr. Mukhopadhyay's laboratory is to understand how cells and organisms regulate the metal manganese, and how elevated exposure to manganese induces toxicity. This is an important area of work because, in humans, manganese poisoning leads to an incurable form of parkinsonism. This award relates to contributions he made in deciphering the role of the gene SLC30A10 in manganese parkinsonism. Humans with mutations in SLC30A10 were recently reported to develop hereditary parkinsonism, but the cause was unclear. His work revealed that the function of SLC30A10 is to remove manganese from cells and the body, and thereby, protect against manganese poisoning. When SLC30A10 is mutated, manganese builds up in the body and causes parkinsonism.

Dr. Mukhopadhyay's future goals are to develop treatments for this disease.

Bruce A. Fowler Undergraduate Educator Award

Recipient: Christine Perdan Curran
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Northern Kentucky University

Dr. Curran has been awarded the 2020 SOT Bruce A. Fowler Undergraduate Educator Award for her excellence, creativity, and success in undergraduate instruction in toxicology and the sciences as a whole.

Dr. Curran received her BSJ from Ohio University. Then, as evidence of her devotedness to the field, she began instructing undergraduates even before she received her PhD in environmental health from the University of Cincinnati in 2007. Dr. Curran began her teaching career in 1992 as an Adjunct Instructor and later as an Adjunct Assistant Professor of biology at the University of Cincinnati. In 2008, she joined Northern Kentucky University as an Assistant Professor of biological sciences, where she continues to serve as a Professor of biological sciences and Director of the neuroscience program.

Dr. Curran has played a key role in the environmental science program at Northern Kentucky University, which not only has doubled in size but also has added a bachelor of arts program in addition to the original bachelor of science program since she began her career at the university. Specifically, she has developed a widely popular course in environmental toxicology that combines problem-based, team-based, and service learning to expose students to toxicology concepts and encourage them to apply such concepts to issues in the community. Further, Dr. Curran has integrated her toxicology training into her anatomy and physiology courses, which more than 200 students take each semester.

The Curran laboratory, which focuses on gene-environment interactions during brain development, is primarily composed of undergraduate students. At 90%, the average retention and graduation rate for Dr. Curran’s students is double that of STEM students throughout the nation. Over the past decade, more than 75 undergraduates have trained under Dr. Curran, and during that time frame, her students have delivered 110 presentations—many of which received awards—during regional and national meetings. She also works toward facilitating success in the STEM fields for women, underrepresented minorities, and underserved populations through her involvement in both the Next-Generation Researchers Initiative working group of the National Institutes of Health and the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB).

Dr. Curran’s exemplary scientific service includes her current role as President of the Society for Birth Defects Research and Prevention (formerly the Teratology Society) and participation on several Editorial Boards, including presently, as a member of the Reproductive Toxicology Editorial Board. She also is a FASEB Board Member.

Dr. Curran has been a champion of undergraduate education within SOT as well, including active involvement in the Undergraduate Educator Network. An SOT member since 2004, she not only has co-chaired the K–12 Education Subcommittee and the Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, but also has been making major contributions to the Ohio Valley Regional Chapter since she was a graduate student. In addition to serving as the chapter’s first K–12 liaison, Dr. Curran also initiated the undergraduate poster awards and was the 2015–2016 Ohio Valley Regional Chapter President. Further, Dr. Curran is the inaugural Chair of the Faculty United for Undergraduate Recruitment and Education (FUTURE) Committee, formed in 2019 with the purpose of recruiting, retaining, training, and educating undergraduates with an interest in toxicology and preparing future generations for success in the field.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Robert Freeborn
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Mr. Freeborn was absolutely dumb-founded when he was announced as the winner. He was pleased just to be a finalist, and didn't think he had a shot at taking first prize. He thinks he probably looked like a fool when they called his name and his jaw dropped. This award will help him afford housing in San Francisco this summer while he pursues an internship to learn new techniques to bring back to his lab which can be applied to his thesis project. Specifically, he will have the opportunity to learn how to perform micro-CT analysis on lungs, which is something they have not yet done in his lab. Mr. Freeborn's research project studies the effects of the food additive, tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), on T cells. Specifically, he studies the T cell response to influenza infection and how tBHQ modulates this response in mice. His data suggests that tBHQ impairs the T cell-mediated response to influenza infection by delaying T cell activation, suppressing effector function, and reducing the number of T cells capable of recognizing virus-infected cells. In non-technical terms, this can be thought of as the cells being late to show up to work and additionally doing a sub-par job once arriving to work. This leads to delayed viral clearance. Additionally, this leads to a prolonged infection upon secondary infection with the virus. He hypothesizes that tBHQ could reduce vaccine efficacy because of this. He also identified a potentially novel mechanism by which tBHQ modulates T cell function, which is through upregulation of the immunosuppressive proteins CTLA-4 and IL-10.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kelly Hanson
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rochester Medical Center

Upon receiving notification that she was a finalist for the Mechanisms Specialty Section Carl C. Smith Graduate Student Award, Ms. Hanson was very excited and felt determined to push herself to complete the manuscript by the deadline. She was appreciative of the opportunity not only to submit the manuscript for consideration for the prestigious Carl C. Smith award, but also to have the motivation to finish experiments, write, and revise within the span of a month. This helped accelerate her submission to Toxicological Sciences and have the reviewers’ comments by the time she held her final committee meeting, which provided justification to her committee for adhering to her proposed timeline and scheduling her defense date for the coming summer. At the Mechanisms SS reception at SOT 2019 in Baltimore, Ms. Hanson was pleasantly surprised and very grateful to receive the news that her manuscript won 2nd Place for the Carl C. Smith award. She believes that this honor will help to distinguish and substantiate her research and scientific communication skills to potential future employers, and will help shape her career trajectory in an undeniably positive way. She was very thankful for this opportunity and she looks forward to continuing her involvement with the Mechanisms Specialty Section and the Society of Toxicology as a whole.

As a fifth-year student in the Toxicology Training Program in the Department of Environmental Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Ms. Hanson works in the lab of Dr. Jacob N. Finkelstein. This lab primarily focuses on the late effects of ionizing radiation exposure to lung tissue, both in the context of radiotherapy for thoracic tumors as well as countermeasures for biological terrorism. Her own thesis work focuses on the role of fibroblasts in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF). As a consequence of the lung’s radiation response, fibroblasts acquire an apoptosis resistant phenotype, which is a key part of PF pathology. During normal wound healing, fibroblasts should proliferate and produce extracellular matrix and are later cleared with an apoptotic signal; however, in the onset of PF, apoptosis resistant fibroblasts continue to proliferate unchecked and thus lead to excessive and progressive scar tissue accumulation, which is ultimately fatal. Her research aims to clarify the cellular mechanisms that lead to the apoptosis resistant phenotype of fibroblasts in PF. Briefly, the findings from her thesis work have shown first that fibroblast apoptosis resistance occurs much earlier in radiation-induced PF pathogenesis than previously thought, and secondly, that the onset of this detrimental phenotype is at least partially mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Ms. Hanson's future goals include transitioning into an industry or consulting setting and concentrating on risk assessment, hazard characterization, and scientific communication.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jessica Murray
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Ms. Murray was very grateful to receive the Carl C Smith Award. The application process that included writing a full manuscript was a valuable experience for her and she was honored that her work was considered impactful in the field of mechanistic toxicology. This award will help her pursue a career in research and to develop as a scientist by funding travel to scientific meetings where she will continue to learn cutting-edge topics in the field.

Ms. Murray's thesis research focuses on the metabolic activation of nitro polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitroarenes) which are highly mutagenic compounds produced in diesel engine exhaust. These compounds require metabolic activation via nitroreduction to exert their mutagenic and tumorigenic effects, but mammalian nitroreductases beyond NQO1 have not been well characterized. Surprisingly she found that human aldo keto reductases (AKRs), which are typically carbonyl reductases, are able to display nitroreductase activity towards a representative nitroarene 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA). The catalytic efficiencies are equal to that of NQO1, which up till now was thought to be the primary enzyme that toxified 3-NBA. She also found that these enzymes contributed equally in the nitroreduction of 3-NBA in vitro and together, accounted for at least 50% nitroreductase activity in lung epithelial cells. Both NQO1 and AKR1C genes are tightly regulated by Nrf2 signaling which regulates the antioxidant gene battery. There is considerable interest in developing Nrf2 inducers as chemopreventives since Nrf2 upregulates Phase II enzymes, glutathione synthesis, and drug transporters. Given that AKRs and NQO1 toxify 3-NBA and are among the most upregulated genes by Nrf2, she aimed to investigate whether Nrf2 activation as a chemopreventive strategy may exacerbate 3-NBA toxification. She found that heterozygous and homozygous Nrf2 knockout via CRISPR-Cas9 decreased 3-NBA toxification by 50% and 80%, and Nrf2 activation with pharmacological inducers increased 3-NBA toxification by 40-60%. Enhanced 3-NBA metabolic activation due to Nrf2 activity may lead to an increase in DNA adduct burden which would promote mutagenesis. Given these data, she feels it may be appropriate to explore whether Nrf2 activation could be deleterious in certain exposure contexts.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Katelyn Lavrich
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: UNC Chapel Hill

Dr. Lavrich was honored to be considered a finalist for the Carl C. Smith Graduate Student Award. She is grateful to join the prestigious past award winners and hopes to follow in their footsteps as leaders in toxicology. This award will offset travel costs to the annual meeting, where she was shared her research and hoped to discover career opportunities through networking.

Her research investigates how air pollution initiates downstream health effects in humans. She studies the first oxidative stress events that quinones, ubiquitous components of particulate matter (PM), have in human lung cells that could activate inflammation. In this work, she showed that in a human airway epithelial cell line,1,2-naphthoquinone inhibits both mitochondrial function and glycolysis, two key bioenergetic processes for cellular energy production and novel mechanisms of PM-associated quinone toxicity. She optimized bioenergetic analyses for primary human lung macrophages and found that 1,2-naphthoquinone inhibits mitochondrial function in a similar manner to the epithelial cell line, confirming this mechanism is plausible in multiple cell types of human lungs. She concluded that 1,2-naphthoquinone disrupts bioenergetic function and redox homeostasis in human lung cells. As she recently defended her dissertation, she is excited to figure out the next step in her career in toxicology. She looks forward to further bridging mechanistic toxicology to clinical and translational settings. Ultimately, it is her hope to use her training in mechanistic toxicology to translate scientific findings into meaningful policy decisions.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dharmin  Rokad
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Mr. Rokad feels it would be unbelievable and at the same time very encouraging experience to receive this award at this time of his career in graduate research studies. His plan is to pursue a career in Academia where he would like to continue investigating the role of metal exposure in increasing risk of chronic neurological diseases at molecular levels, including various crucial mechanisms. Receiving the Carl C. Smith Graduate Student Award sponsored by the Mechanism Specialty Section in recognition of his ongoing work would be an important step in realizing his career goal.

His PhD research focuses on divalent manganese (Mn) interactions with α-Synuclein protein and neurodegeneration. His current project focuses on investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in manganese-induced misfolded α-Synuclein release through exosomes and its relevance to synucleopathies. While it is known that Mn is an essential component of many enzymes, it helps in proper bone formation but occupational exposure to elevated doses of Mn can lead to Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson’s disease. Despite evidences of Mn induced neurodegeneration, the key cellular-molecular signaling mechanisms driving manganese-induced exosomes release remain unknown. He is currently evaluating the role of manganese in modulating endosomal protein trafficking mechanisms to promote α-synuclein exosomal release. Identifying the key molecular regulators of the endosomal protein trafficking mechanisms will help them target those key proteins to develop medical agents and help them discover biomarkers to develop early stage diagnostic techniques, which will be crucial in the field of neurodegenerative diseases.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: John Szilagyi
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS Chemistry
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Dr. Szilagyi feels it is an honor to even be considered for this prestigious award. He is especially grateful for the opportunity  as it will allow him to showcase his work to the members of the Mechanisms Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology.

His research is focused on understanding the factors that influence drug trafficking across the placenta. Specifically, his research this year seeks to elucidate the role that endocannabinoids may play in placentation and the expression of drug transporters in the placenta.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Emma Bowers
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Ms. Bowers is thrilled to have received the Carl C. Smith award. Many of the most successful scientists in SOT have received this award, and she is honored to be in their ranks. This award will help her to gain recognition as a leader in the toxicology field. Additionally this award will help offset travel costs associated with attending the annual meeting.She is conducting research at the US EPA Human Studies facility under the direction of Dr. David Diaz-Sanchez and Dr. Shaun McCullough. In her dissertation research she uses a novel application of human primary cell culture to identify molecular mechanisms that mediate differential susceptibility to ozone exposure. She is examining two long-observed but poorly understood ozone inflammatory responses that may hold the key to understanding differences in susceptibility: response heterogeneity and adaptation. As air pollutant exposure causes inflammation which contributes to the leading cause of mortality- cardiopulmonary diseases- her research has the potential to make a significant public health impact. After her doctoral studies her plan is to obtain a post-doctoral position and eventually become a principal investigator. As a PI, she will continue investigating mechanisms of toxicity with a specific emphasis on toxicoepigenomics research.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kelly Fader
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BSc
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Ms. Fader said it was an honor to learn that she had been selected as a finalist for the Carl C Smith Student Mechanisms Award. She immediately shared the news with her principal investigator, Dr. Timothy Zacharewski, as well as the postdoctoral researchers in the lab, who shared in the excitement. It is a great feeling to receive recognition for the research that she has been working on over the past three years from fellow scientists in the field of toxicology. She looks forward to attending the Mechanisms Specialty Section Reception in Baltimore at the 2017 Annual Society of Toxicology Meeting for the announcement of the winner. Metabolic syndrome, a disease which consists of obesity, elevated blood lipids, high blood pressure and high blood sugar, is approaching epidemic levels in the United States. In the liver, MetS is first observed as fat accumulation which can develop into non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and liver cancer. Recently, several environmental contaminants including dioxin have been implicated in MetS development. In mice, dioxin causes accumulation of fat in the liver (fatty liver), primarily originating from the diet, which progresses to inflammation and fibrosis over time. Her research investigates dioxin-induced changes along the intestinal tract that promote the development of NAFLD and other complex metabolic disorders. Specifically, the manuscript she submitted for consideration of the Carl C Smith Award investigated the role of dioxin-elicited iron overloading in the progression of NAFLD. Upon completing her PhD at Michigan State University, she plans to obtain further postdoctoral training before pursuing an independent research career at either an academic institution or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She would like to remain in the field of biomedical toxicology, investigating the effects of environmental contaminants, food ingredients, and drugs on human health and disease. In particular, she is interested in investigating the role of gene-environment interactions in the development and progression of complex multifactorial diseases such as metabolic syndrome and cancer.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Bryan Harder
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Mr. Harder felt it was a terrific honor to be selected to receive the Mechanism Specialty Section's Carl C. Smith Graduate Student Award. His initial reaction to becoming a finalist was tremendous relief, because two members from my laboratory have previously won this prestigious award. Because of this, there is a large amount of pressure to conduct award-worthy science and he is extremely pleased to learn that his hard work has paid off. It is his hope to showcase this accomplishment on his CV and resume as he prepares to apply and interview for jobs in the coming months. He is confident that this award will attract excellent scientists, which will allow him to continue working on challenging research projects in the field of cancer pharmacology and cancer toxicology. Under the supervision of Dr. Donna Zhang, his lab largely focuses on understanding cancer progression and finding ways to suppress this phenomenon. They have recently described how activation of a transcription factor called NRF2 is frequently observed in various cancers, and that inhibition of this factor can help chemotherapy work better. Typically, the events that lead to NRF2 overexpression are due to genetic mutations, but his research has pinpointed a novel mechanism of unwanted NRF2 activation via activation of the progesterone receptor. He has shown that women who take progestins for the treatment of Type 1 Endometrial cancer could be susceptible to activation of NRF2, potentially leading to acquired chemoresistance in their tumors. He has identified a novel progesterone receptor target gene, TSC22D4, that aberrantly activates the NRF2 pathway, providing a new link between hormone receptor signaling and NRF2 research and how they relate to cancer progression. He feels that his work is a good representation of the quality of science that typically comes out of the lab and hopes that future students can utilize this finding to continue to pursue this interesting story. It is his intent to publish this research soon after the SOT meeting and use it to showcase his intellectual abilities while applying to cancer research positions.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dahea You
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PharmD, PhD Candidate
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Ms. You was very pleased and honored to receive the news that she was selected as the finalist for this prestigious award. It really reminded her of the importance of the research that she is pursuing and provided further motivation to drive her project. She was really interested in research during her pharmacy program and thus decided to obtain deeper knowledge and skills in pursuing research to achieve her career goals as a clinical researcher. Toxicology was a very attractive field where she feels she could maximally incorporate her clinical knowledge with basic science. She was greatly interested in neurotoxicology and decided to pursue her current research. There are yet lots of aspects that need more extensive investigations in the field of neurotoxicology and with her clinical and scientific knowledge, it is her hope to play an unique role in expanding this subject area.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Bharat Bhushan
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center

Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the foremost cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the US. Despite decades of research, current treatment options after APAP-overdose are extremely limited. Liver injury after APAP-overdose is subsequently followed by compensatory liver regeneration, which promotes recovery. Preventing liver injury and stimulating liver regeneration are potential strategies to develop novel therapies for APAP-induced ALF. However, mechanisms of APAP-induced liver toxicity or subsequent liver regeneration are not completely understood. In the work that will be presented at the 2016 SOT annual meeting, they investigated role of EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) signaling in APAP-induced ALF. Role of EGFR signaling in APAP-induced liver toxicity and subsequent liver regeneration is completely unknown. In this extremely novel work, Dr. Bhushan and colleagues demonstrated that EGFR signaling plays a dual role in APAP overdose and is involved in both initiation of APAP-induced injury and in stimulating subsequent liver regeneration. They demonstrated, for the first time, that EGFR is rapidly activated after APAP overdose in both mice and primary human hepatocytes and translocated to mitochondria where it was involved in mitochondrial damage leading to liver injury. APAP-induced liver injury was almost completely abolished by early treatment with EGFR inhibitor. In fact, they demonstrated that an early EGFR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy may outperform treatment with NAC (N-acetyl cysteine), which is the current standard of care for not only APAP overdose but all suspected cases of ALF. Interestingly, they found that delayed activation of EGFR was crucial for compensatory liver regeneration response, such that delayed inhibition of EGFR in mice caused remarkable impairment of liver regeneration, resulting in substantial decrease of both recovery and survival. Thus, their work revealed an extremely novel and intriguing mechanisms about how a cell membrane receptor, EGFR, can translocate to mitochondria and cause both cell death or cell proliferation signaling in hepatocytes, in a time dependent manner, during APAP-induced ALF.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nikita Joshi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a type of fibrotic liver disease that can lead to liver failure and potentially cancer. It accounts for approximately 8% of all liver transplants in the United States and there is currently no established curative therapy for PSC. Ms. Joshi's exciting research characterizes a novel mechanism whereby the coagulation protein fibrinogen interacts with integrin aMß2 to reduce biliary fibrosis and suggests a novel putative therapeutic target for this difficult to treat fibrotic disease.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rance Nault
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Mr. Nault's research examines the role of environmental contaminants of the development of fatty liver disease. In order to explore these questions he uses a combination of ‘omic’ techniques to examine changes in gene expression regulation, gene expression, and metabolites, and integrate these using a variety of computational tools. Consequently, by using these data together we can look at changes within the context of the whole system. In the future he will delve deeper into key features that were highlighted by these high-throughput evaluations, more specifically on the role of PKM2 in fatty liver caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) which is the research for which this award was given. They found that following TCDD exposure, a change in the PKM isoform is observed which reprograms metabolism similar to that of a cancer cell. Further evidence in metabolite and protein levels demonstrated that the livers of TCDD treated mice exhibit many features of cancer cells despite the absence of cancer. They conclude that this isoform switching likely plays a role in antioxidant defenses. Future work will examine this hypothesis in further depth using genetic models.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dwayne Carter
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: UTMB

Dwayne Carter is a Graduate Student at the University of Texas Medical Branch and received the Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, "Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation By Cinnabarinic Acid Is Required for Stanniocalcin-2 mediated Protection Against Alcohol Induced Hepatic Injury." His research showed how the physiological activity of AhR in the liver protects against acute alcohol induced liver injury. This award will allow him to attend more scientific meetings, which will allow more networking and collaboration with other investigators. He would like to investigate and understand the mechanisms that will form a proverbial bridge between liver toxicity and aging, and believes that a healthier liver may allow us to have a better quality of life in our elderly years.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Suvarthi Das
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina

Suvarthi Das is a graduate student at the University of South Carolina and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Redox signaling induced TLR4 activation is crucial for disinfection byproduct (DBP)-mediated NASH." Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is a progressive stage of NAFLD, and a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome has been rising in tandem with the increase in obesity epidemic. Her work explores the probable molecular mechanisms in driving the causation of NASH in obese mice, when there is a second hit from environmental toxin present in drinking water (disinfection byproduct. We observed that activation of the enzyme NOX and then recruitment of TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) in the lipid rafts of the hepatic cell-membranes play a crucial role in the ensuing injury and inflammation that leads to NASH symptoms. This can translate into discovery of new persistent biomarkers and drug targets in NASH. To date treatment of NASH is very difficult as there are no persistent or reliable biomarkers. It is a silent disease and patients normally do not get diagnosed unless they go to the clinic with some symptoms like pain in the upper right quadrant, nausea etc. Thus elucidation of the intermediary pathways and molecules will open new avenues for drug targeting for this very alarming silent killer, which is evidently triggered by environmental toxins.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Eric Ditzel
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Eric Ditzel is a Graduate Student at the University of Arizona and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, "Arsenite during Fetal Development Alters Energy Metabolism and Increases Susceptibility to Fatty Liver Disease." His work focuses on how exposure to arsenic during development alters fundamental processes in energy metabolism in such a way that there is increased incidence of fatty liver disease present later in life. The risks of developmental exposure to arsenic are not fully understood, and this work helps illuminate how exposures may contribute to adult onset of disease.The proposed mechanism for this increase in disease is novel and may help others investigate related disease states as well. He considers this award as a motivator to push him to continue to explore the mechanistic basis for arsenic induced disease by honing in on which effects are relevant for certain exposures and diseases is necessary to explore ways to mitigate disease. Millions of people are exposed to arsenic through drinking water, inhalation, diet, and occupational exposure, and there are many well characterized risks associated with those exposures. However, the risks of low-dose exposure and exposure during development are less well understood. By focusing on the mechanism behind the observed pathologies, we are better able to address the problem and health outcomes in susceptible populations in the future.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nikita  Joshi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MSc, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Nikita Joshi is a graduate student at Michigan State University and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Fibrin(ogen) engagement of aMß2-integrin limits chronic liver fibrosis induced by a bile duct toxicant in mice." Her work seeks to identify mechanisms whereby fibrinogen, an integral component of the hemostatic system, contributes to chronic liver injury and fibrosis. Her laboratory previously demonstrated that mice deficient in the blood clotting protein fibrinogen, developed markedly worse liver injury in a model of chronic liver fibrosis. This finding challenged the assumption that the presence of fibrin clots in the liver is bad. Since joining the lab, she has sought to define the mechanisms that underlie the protective effects of fibrinogen. The work submitted for consideration for the Mechanisms this Award describes an element of her research project highlighting the novel protective role of fibrinogen in chronic liver fibrosis via its engagement of the leukocyte integrin aMß2. Treatment options for liver fibrosis are limited with a liver transplant being the last resort. Since the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of this are not completely understood, it is vital that we interrogate the mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis chronic liver disease so that better treatment options can be developed. Continued investigation of the mechanisms whereby coagulation impacts liver fibrosis is warranted, particularly as elements of hemostasis gain traction as biomarkers and as potential therapeutic targets in liver disease and health.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jamie Moscovitz
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BA Biology, BA Secondary Education
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Jamie Moscovitz is a graduate student at Rutgers University and recieved the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Pregnancy Outcomes Following Short Term Treatment Of Mice With The Farnesoid X Receptor Agonist GW4064." Her research uses pharmacological and genetic models to characterize the importance of regulation by the nuclear receptor, Farnesoid X Receptor (Fxr), on metabolic and transport pathways in the liver and intestine during pregnancy. Fxr is critical for the regulation of bile acid synthesis, metabolism, hepatotoxicity and excretion. Her thesis work thus far has demonstrated that a number of direct intestinal and hepatic targets of Fxr are dysregulated during pregnancy. By studying the mechanisms of adaptive changes in the bile acid pathway in pregnancy, we may identify why some women have heightened susceptibility to cholestatic liver disease during pregnancy, as well as investigate a potential therapeutic target for treating these women. This research will aid in creating a safer and healthier world for both mothers and fetuses during a very sensitive and critical time of development.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Deanna Salter
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island

Deanna Salter is a Graduate Student at the University of Rhode Island and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Low Dose Exposure to the Environmental Chemical, Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid (PFOS) Thwarts Beneficial Effects of Caloric Restriction and Metformin." In her work, she is trying to elucidate a deeper mechanism to determine how PFOS stimulates with glucose production. Currently she is evaluating whether the increased glucose and lipid accumulation is related to changes in the phosphorylation status of AMPK and associated mediators of this pathway. She believes her project is highly relevant to toxicology due to the nature of PFOS exposure. Although PFOS exposure is decreasing, there is still EPA concern and it is considered to be an “emerging” chemical of concern (Zhao 2012).

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prajakta Shimpi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: M.Pharm
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island

Prajakta Shimpi is a Graduate Student at the University of Rhode Island and received the Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Early Epigenetic Modulation of Nrf2 and Lipogenic Genes by PNPP Exposure of Bisphenol A is Associated with Hepatic Steatosis in Female Mice." Her work focus is on detecting the detailed molecular studies on how exactly Bisphenol A affects liver pathways. She would like to continue her work on environmental toxicants, and elucidate mechanistic links of how these toxicants affect liver. Her studies with bisphenol A, can also serve as model toxicological investigations for other chemicals.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Lisa Weatherly
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Maine

Lisa Weatherly is a Graduate Student at University of Maine and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Antimicrobial Agent Triclosan is a Mitochondrial Uncoupler in Rat and Human Mast Cells." They assessed if triclosan disrupted mast cell function by examining its effects on the cells’ energy source, ATP. She found that exposure of triclosan to mast cells is causing a dysfunction in production of ATP, at much lower concentrations than those generally found in personal care products. theirdata show that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Due to triclosan’s high concentration and use in many personal care products, triclosan’s mitochondrial uncoupling function must be taken into consideration in future risk assessments, due to the dangerous nature previously seen in other similar chemicals. There is an urgent need for information on the mammalian toxicology of triclosan, and our study will help provide an understanding of how triclosan influences human and animal health.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Wei Zhang
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: Ph.D. Candidate
Institution/Affiliation: Univerisity of Kentucky

Wei Zhang is a graduate student at the University of Kentucky and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, "Loss of Mrp1 Potentiates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Mice." Doxorubicin (DOX) induced cardiac toxicity is most severe dose-limited side effects of this effective chemotherapy drug. The study addresses the important problem of determining how the function of MRP1 could affect this DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. The cardiac function and underline mechanisms were investigated. The study will provide novel insights into the role of Mrp1 in oxidative stress regulation, and thereby give critical information regarding the potential adverse sequelae of introduction of MRP1 inhibitors as adjuncts to clinical chemotherapy of multidrug resistant tumors. Also, it may help to find a potential way to relieve or even prevent this chemotherapy drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dilshan Harischandra
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Dilshan Harischandra is a graduate student at Iowa State University and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, “The Environmental Neurotoxicant Manganese Promotes Prion-like Cell-to-Cell Transmission of α-Synuclein via Exosomes in Cell Culture and Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease.” In this project we are studying the effect of environmental neurotoxicants in developing and progression of Parkinson ’s disease (PD). We looked into the interaction of manganese and prominent protein (alpha-synuclein) implicated in PD and studied how manganese exposure will cause protein to aggregate and accumulate in the brain. Most importantly, we found a possible mechanism via which these mis-folded proteins leave the “sick” cells and enter healthy cells, making them sick too. This mechanism uses very small vesicles to transport these proteins in a cargo-like manner. A good understanding of these mechanisms is important because most neurodegenerative diseases are progressive in nature and pathology seems to move from one part of the brain to another as the disease advance. Recently, we have uncovered that α-synuclein, a key metal-binding protein implicated in Parkinson disease interacts with and binds to manganese, causing the α-synuclein protein to aggregate and transmit through exosomal vesicles. These findings will help understand the cell to cell transmission of aberrant proteins in progressive disease and possibly develop pharmacological strategies to block protein transfer and develop therapies against neurodegenerative diseases.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Swetha Rudraiah
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MVSc
Institution/Affiliation: University of Connecticut

Swetha Rudraiah is a Graduate Student at the University of Connecticut and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, “Tolerance to Acetaminophen (APAP) Hepatotoxicity in a Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3).” Acetaminophen (APAP) is the main constituent of Tylenol and is the most commonly used over the counter drug and is responsible for more than 50% of all acute liver failure cases in the U.S. APAP toxicity is very complex and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is the only FDA approved treatment available for APAP poisoning. In the clinic, NAC is effective only when given within 8 hours after APAP ingestion. Unfortunately, signs of toxicity do not show until after 12-24 hrs following acute intoxication. This growing concern has prompted extensive mechanistic research aimed at devising measures to reduce the risk of liver damage due to APAP and to understand the cellular events responsible for the initiation and progression of APAP toxicity. Although the phenomenon of APAP autoprotection is also seen in patients who repeatedly take higher doses of APAP, the underlying mechanism(s) is not known. Her research specifically investigates the mechanism by which the resistance to acetaminophen ensues.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Christopher Schaupp
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Christopher Schaupp is a graduate student at the University of Washington who received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, “Potential Role of Carbonyl Reductase 3 in Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity.” His work is focused on investigating doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy and candidate genes believed to be responsible for mediating doxorubicin-related sequelae in childhood leukemia patients, a significant public health concern. He hopes to advance the science of toxicology by participating in research that has direct translational benefits to human health. He anticipates that his research will lead to improvements in chemotherapy regimens that both increase efficacy and lessen the risks of serious off-target toxicity.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka Trivedi
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MS (Pharm)
Institution/Affiliation: National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Priyanka Trivedi is a graduate student at the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, India, and won the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, “Effect of Melatonin on Colitis-associated Colon Carcinogenesis in Mice: Role of Autophagy and Nrf2 Signaling Pathways.” Colon carcinogenesis is long known to be associated with ulcerative colitis, a chronic gastrointestinal disorder. Various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that melatonin, a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent, has beneficial effects in cancer. However, elucidation of the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in melatonin-mediated protection against the colon carcinogenesis deserves further investigation. In the present study, the effect of melatonin on autophagy (a process that involves lysosome-mediated degradation of non-essential cellular constituents) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor) signaling pathways in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis was examined. She would like to remain in the field of genotoxicity, carcinogenesis. She would like to discover the basic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of carcinogenesis and the ways to prevent the progression of carcinogenesis to benefit mankind.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Daniel Ferreira
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Connecticut

Daniel Ferreira is a graduate student of the University of Connecticut and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, “Vanin-1 Knockout Mice Exhibit Alterations in Compensatory Immune Infiltration and Hepatocyte Proliferation Following Acetaminophen Toxicity.” His research shows that Vanin-1 knockout mice are more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, despite there being no differences in acetaminophen bioactivation or detoxification by glucuronidation, sulfation, or glutathione status or utilization. He hopes to better protect human health by securing a career in academia or the government. He hopes to use his experience in molecular biology-based scientific techniques and experience to elucidate novel mechanisms of action in order to uncover intracellular signaling pathways responsible for mediating cellular responses to xenoestrogens or other environmental contaminants. The goal would be to identify potential therapeutic targets of endocrine diseases caused by exposure.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: David Klein
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

David Klein is a graduate student of the University of Arizona and he received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for his work entitled, “Mechanism of Transepithelial Transport Leading to Germ Cell Exposure to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI).” His work involved looking at the ability of drugs used to treat HIV infection to bypass the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and exert toxic effects on developing sperm. He is also examining the transport mechanism these drugs use to penetrate the BTB. This award will help him find a postdoctoral position that will advance his career and interests.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tongde Wu
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Tongde Wu is a PhD candidate of the University of Arizona and received the Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award for her work entitled, “XBP1, SYVN1 AND NRF2: At the Crossroad of ER Stress and Oxidative Stress.” Her current research involves learning how the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway crosstalks with unfolded protein response in coordination with anti-oxidative stress and anti-ER stress signaling. Environmental toxicants act on the human system in very complex ways, affecting multiple stress pathways at the same time. The Nrf2 antioxidant pathway normally protects cells from oxidative stress. However, how environmental exposures that are capable to cause oxidative stress and the Nrf2 pathway interact with complex diseases such as liver cirrhosis remains unknown. Investigation of the mechanisms of coordinate regulation will not only shed light on principles of stress response, but may also lead to new approaches in the treatment of stress-related diseases. The environmental pollution problem in eastern Asia is concerning. Ms. Wu wants to continue her research because she believes that environmental issues in one location will eventually cross borders and she would like to be part of the solution.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Owen R. Kinsky
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Owen R. Kinsky, of the University of Arizona, for his abstract entitled, “Dicarbonyl Adduction of Plasminogen: Possible Role in Diabetic Cardiovascular Complications.” Type 2 diabetes is an emerging epidemic in the US. One of the main causes of death from this disease involves cardiovascular complications such as heart attack and stroke, which occur at a higher rate in those with the disease. His work is designed to determine the mechanism by which an increased blood glucose level puts people at a higher risk for these complications. He is currently studying the role that oxidized glucose breakdown products play in the modification of blood-clotting proteins, and how this modification negatively affects the body’s ability to break up blood clots that have formed. With the incidence of this disease increasing at an alarming rate, research of the disease and its complications are more pertinent than ever. He hopes that his current and future work helps to elucidate the mechanism by which this toxicity affects the type 2 diabetes population.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alexandria Lau
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology

Alexandria Lau, of the University of Arizona, for her work entitled, “Arsenic Induces Chronic Nrf2 Activation.” Her work involved elucidating the specific mechanism of how arsenic activates Nrf2, a transcription factor that regulates the antioxidant response, and how the mechanism is different than that of natural compounds, such as sulforaphane found in broccoli and other cruciferase vegetable. She hopes to continue this work, which she is hopeful can lead to the identification of novel molecular markers and the development of rational therapies for the prevention or intervention of arsenic toxicity. These observations might also provide insight to further understand how arsenic activates Nrf2 and/or causes toxicity and carcinogenicity.

Carl C. Smith Mechanisms Student Award Fund

Recipient: Afshin Mohammadi Bardbori
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Afshin Mohammadi Bardbori, of Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, for his abstract entitled, ?The Polyphenols Quercetin, Resveratrol and Curcumin Disturb Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) Signaling by Obstructing the Tightly Regulated Turnover of the Endogenous Ligand FICZ.? A major focus of his research was to characterize molecular mechanisms by which the aryl hydrocarbon receptor can be activated by several nonligands like polyphenols quercetin, resveratrol, and curcumin. He hopes to use this award to strengthen his CV with the goal of finding a postdoctoral position in the US.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Colin Anderson
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Colorado

Mr. Anderson is extremely grateful for this award, and he knows that it will help him gain reputation and standing within his field. He is excited to continue his path towards becoming an independent investigator.

Mr. Anderson is investigating the fungicide maneb and its mechanistic association with Parkinson's disease. Maneb has been shown to directly inhibit dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the molecular mechanism has yet to be uncovered. His work outlines how thiol interactions between maneb and protein cysteines may underlie this inhibition, and how this contributes to the Parkinson's disease phenotype.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Reena Berman
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: National Jewish Health

Ms. Berman is very proud and honored to have been a finalist for the Carl C. Smith Award. This is her final year of her graduate studies and earning this prestigious award is a great achievement to close out her graduate career. The work that went into this award application was a collaborative effort between multiple groups and facilities across the United States. It is a great validation of the efforts of Ms. Berman and her colleagues to be recognized at SOT and by the Mechanisms Specialty Section.

For her PhD in Toxicology, Ms. Berman is studying the role of toxic desert dust from Afghanistan in causing respiratory illness in deployed soldiers. Increasing numbers of soldiers are returning from deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq with asthma-like symptoms. She plans to complete her thesis in the next few months and pursue a career in industry after her defense. In the manuscript that was submitted for this award, she used cutting edge single-cell RNA sequencing to examine deployment related lung disease after returning from Afghanistan. Ms. Berman modeled the post-deployment setting by exposing mice to prolonged aerosolized Afghanistan desert dust, then treating them with a common household allergen. By looking at each cell on an individual level, she was able to identify a unique population of cells that was active only after exposure to both dust and allergen. Ms. Berman believes that deployment related lung disease may persist after a soldier returns from duty because of the activities of these uniquely induced cells.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Melissa Clemens
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MPH, MLS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Ms. Clemens was so grateful to receive this award. The Carl C. Smith Award is highly prestigious, and it makes it possible for her to attend SOT where she can share her research and network with other scientists.

The goal of Ms. Clemens' research is to determine the role of lipids in the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and repair. She recently discovered that endogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) enhances liver regeneration. Since PA is available over-the-counter as a dietary supplement, she next wondered if exogenous PA can be used as a treatment for liver injury. Most recently, she determined that PA treatment reduces liver injury caused by acetaminophen overdose through a mechanism that seems to involve upregulation of the cytokine interleukin-6. After graduation, Ms. Clemens hopes to continue her liver research but expand to include other liver diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Emily Marques
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island

Ms. Marques is honored to receive this award and the recognition will help her to secure a postdoctoral position that will advance her career and interests in liver toxicology.

She is currently researching liver toxicity of perfluoroaklyl substances (PFAS) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models as part of the University of Rhode Island's Superfund center, Sources, Transport, Exposure & Effects of PFASs (STEEP). In the work Ms. Marques has submitted for this award, she has measured and screened the ability of 19 different PFAS to induce lipid accumulation in human hepatocytes.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Archit Rastogi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BTech
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Mr. Rastogi was thrilled to receive the award. While it is always gratifying to win an award - the Carl C. Smith Award - owing to its storied history and prestige, is especially rewarding. This award will facilitate his traveling to the SOT Annual Meeting, which will be invaluable at this juncture in his career.

Mr. Rastogi investigated how early life exposure to per fluorinated compounds disrupt the developing pancreas, and how this can lead to later life diseases. The first part of his work showed that redox disruptions induced by exposures at specific developmental stages underlies this toxicity. The next part of his work, for which he won this award, identifies a specific transcription factor in the pancreas that PFOS affects, disrupting endogenous redox signaling. This is significant because it provides physicians with a roadmap, identifying molecular targets that they could screen for in vulnerable and exposed populations.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Christine Rygiel
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MPH, CIC
Institution/Affiliation: University of Michigan

Ms. Rygiel is excited about receiving this award because it will help off-set some of the costs associated with attending and traveling to the SOT annual conference. Being able to present her research at SOT will help her gather feedback regarding her recent research work. Feedback will help her strengthen the ideas around any uncertainties in this new protocol in order for others to adapt these new interpretations regarding distinguishing the differences between methylation and hydroxymethylation, and the potentially different roles each mark presented. Ms. Rygiel greatly appreciates the funding!

Ms. Rygiel's research focuses on understanding the effects that perinatal lead (Pb) exposure has on DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation. DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation have been proposed as mechanisms that drive the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) hypothesis, which states that early-life toxicant exposures, including Pb, during developmental periods (i.e. gestation, infancy, puberty, etc.) may be linked to the development of disease later in life. Increased levels of 5mC are associated with decreased transcription factor binding at promoter/enhancer sites and suppression of transcription. While 5mC is widely studied, the role of 5hmC, an intermediate in oxidative demethylation that is associated with increased gene expression, as an important epigenetic mark of active DNA demethylation remains a great debate. Most current methods, including standard bisulfite treatments, do not differentiate between 5mC and 5hmC. Therefore, detecting changes in levels of 5mC and 5hmC, separately, may provide additional insights into mechanisms of Pb-induced epigenetic alterations relating to the DOHaD hypothesis. Ms. Rygiel tested the hypothesis that prenatal Pb exposure at each trimester within candidate regions of genes previously associated with prenatal Pb exposure would result in independent alterations in 5mC and 5hmC levels. Environmental-mediated 5mC/5hmC changes could have important implications for transcriptional control and expression, and may underlie later-life disease developmental. Her results show that 5hmC is not only detectable in whole blood leukocytes, but that there are trimester-specific alterations in 5mC and 5hmC that are independent of each other, thus providing mechanistic support for 5hmC role in Pb-induced epigenetic modifications. Future work involves determining the viability of surrogate tissues (blood leukocytes) explaining effects in target tissues (brain cortex), which will utilize a mouse model. We expect to see that 5hmC patterns in blood will be correlated to cortex, potentially providing evidence that the blood epigenome provides a viable signature for Pb exposure related epigenetic changes relevant to epigenetic epidemiology.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Cody Schmidlin
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Mr. Schmidlin was thrilled that his research was recognized as being worthy of this award. He is grateful to the Mechanisms Specialty Section and the Society of Toxicology for this opportunity.

Chronic arsenic exposure continues to be a worldwide health concern because of its prevalence and contribution to disease, specifically cancer. Many individuals, specifically in the southwestern United States, are exposed to chronic low dose arsenic levels in ground and well water as a result of mining and mineralization. Mr. Schmidlin's research indicates that chronic exposure to arsenic leads normal lung cells to become cancerous, and that these cells have properties consistent with cancer cell spread. When cancer spreads in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, the 5-year survival rate drops to 6%, as compared to 60% in localized tumors; however, the exact mechanism for what causes NSCLC cells to spread is unknown. One proposed contributor is nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), a protein with known oncogenic properties that is induced by arsenic toxicity. While NRF2 itself has not been shown to cause cancer cell spread, Mr. Schmidlin demonstrated that it can regulate SRY-box 9 (SOX9): a cellular protein linked with cancer cell spread. Then, he demonstrated that chronic arsenic exposure increased expression of both NRF2 and SOX9, and that this made lung cells more cancerous in terms of growth and spread. To confirm that one of the mechanisms behind NSCLC spread was NRF2 and SOX9, he demonstrated that with loss of NRF2 or SOX9, cancer cells grew slower, and invaded and migrated less. By providing a mechanism by which lung cancer can spread, Mr. Schmidlin has a better understanding of how he can target certain proteins to improve patient outcome. Overall, this evidence suggests that NRF2 control of SOX9 expression can contribute to the spread of both environmentally and genetically driven lung tumors. In the future, he hopes to find methods/drugs to target the NRF2 signaling pathway in order to prevent cancer cell spread via increased SOX9 expression.

Carl C. Smith Student Mechanisms Award Fund

Recipient: Regina Schnegelberger
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh

Ms. Schnegelberger became a member of SOT in 2018 and attended her first SOT meeting shortly thereafter. She is looking forward to attending the upcoming SOT meeting, which will be her third. Each meeting she has been overwhelmed by the quality and breadth of research presented and always finds herself with a renewed sense of enthusiasm and excitement towards her own studies. She is positive the upcoming meeting won?t be any different and that the information she receives from attending will be very helpful not only for her research project, but also for her professional development as a scientist. She is very excited and honored to receive this award and afford her the opportunity to present her research, develop relationships with fellow scientists, and explore the possibilities that a doctorate degree can provide to her.

The research in Ms. Schnegelberger's laboratory focuses on the environmental toxicant vinyl chloride (VC) and its exposure in the context of underlying liver disease. The overall goal of her laboratory is to demonstrate that low environmental exposure may have significant effects on human health when combined with additional risk factors for liver disease. Specifically, data published by her lab showed that sub-hepatotoxic levels of VC/VC metabolites can exacerbate existing liver injury. Ms. Schnegelberger's lab has shown that VC exposure is mitotoxic, significantly decreasing mitochondrial respiration and respiratory capacity. VC also enhanced oxidative and ER stress caused by high-fat diet (HFD). Mechanistically, very little is known regarding how chronic VC exposure enhances the risk of developing liver disease. Her current research project is an extension of the previous work from her lab to fill this critical gap. One of the major observations in her work was that VC caused mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. Mitochondria and the ER physically interact via specialized contact sites called mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs), through which membrane and luminal components exchange. Importantly, MAMs shelter key components that impact cellular and organelle function by regulating and controlling mitochondrial function, ER stress signaling, and autophagy. Moreover, ER-mitochondria contact sites also support the mediation of mitochondrial fission and fusion events, and disrupted ER-mitochondria interactions can result in ER stress. Ms. Schnegelberger has specifically hypothesize that VC exposure disrupts ER-mitochondria communication, resulting in dysregulated calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species generation, impaired mitochondrial function, and ER stress.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Meghan Rebuli
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Rebuli was very excited about receiving this award. It validates all of the work that she has accomplished in her tenure as a postdoctoral researcher and reinforces the importance of her service and leadership in advancing women in toxicology. This award will help her pursue her research by encouraging her continued dedication to efforts to advance the visibility, recognition, and support of women in the field of toxicology. Additionally, Dr. Rebuli will continue to strive to improve the inclusion of women as subjects in scientific research and analyzing all of her endpoints by sex to enhance the available data on toxicology relevant to women's biology and physiology.

A variety of pulmonary diseases are known to affect females differently than males, in incidence, clinical manifestation, and severity. In the case of asthma, incidence and severity are thought to be sex hormone dependent as males are more susceptible before puberty, then incidence flips to be female-heavy after puberty, and is further altered during changes in hormonal status such as pregnancy and menopause. Another example is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where cigarette smoking was previously thought to be a primary risk factor, however recent evidence suggests that even females who are never smokers are more likely to be diagnosed with COPD than men. In both asthma and COPD, environmental factors have also been linked to disease incidence and exacerbation severity, however little is known about the interaction of sex and environmental exposures and their collective contribution to disease. To fill this gap, Dr. Rebuli's postdoctoral research has focused on investigating the interaction of inhaled pollutants, including wood smoke and e-cigarettes, and sex to induce differential effects on the respiratory innate immune system. She first identified a number of baseline sex differences in respiratory immune gene expression, which was the basis for analyzing effects of toxicants in the airway sex-specifically. She then completed two human studies to identify sex-specific effects on respiratory immune host defense after exposure to wood smoke and e-cigarettes. In the wood smoke exposure study, Dr. Rebuli used a human controlled exposure system to expose healthy human subjects to wood smoke in order to mimic wildfire exposures in a more controlled system. She then administered a vaccine dose of Live Attenuated Influenza Virus (LAIV), a cold adapted virus that only replicates in the nasal passages, to safely study the potential for air pollutants to alter response to infection. She collected samples pre- and post-infection from the nose and used targeted gene array technology to analyze nasal immune cell gene expression. From this study, Dr. Rebuli identified a variety of genes in the airway that interacted both with sex and exposure, where males experienced increased rates of inflammation in response to wood smoke exposure, compared to filtered air; while females experienced mild suppression of host-defense responses (effects in opposite directions). These effects suggest that males and females are likely differentially susceptible to infection and infection induced inflammation after wood smoke exposure. This work has been published in the top respiratory journal in her field, American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine. Presenting this work, Dr. Rebuli has also won several awards and has been featured as the first author in several popular press pieces about this work. To explore the potential for a common mode of action (MOA) in sex specific response to toxicants, she completed a similar study using a different toxicant, e-cigarettes, she inoculated non-smokers, e-cigarette users, and cigarette smokers with LAIV, taking samples from the nose pre- and post- infection, analyzing changes in nasal epithelial cell gene expression and nasal mucosal immune mediator levels using the non-invasive nasal sampling method that she developed. In this study, Dr. Rebuli reproduced previous findings of impaired host-defense response in cigarette smokers and she identified novel sex-specific responses, particularly in e-cigarette users. While links between sex and environmental exposures have been suggested in epidemiological and animal studies, her postdoctoral work includes the first controlled human exposure studies to identify respiratory sex differences after toxicant and influenza exposure. To expand on these studies and fill knowledge gaps related to sex specific impacts of respiratory toxicants, her ongoing research is focused on investigating potential mechanisms of action (correlation of sex hormone levels with effects or sex-specific gene-level regulation of effects), the role of critical windows of exposure on clinical outcomes, and understanding sex specific effects of air pollutants on respiratory diseases across the lifespan. Overall, the goal for her research is to understand the interaction of sex and air pollutants on the respiratory immune system.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Victoria Salemme
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Ms. Salemme was amazed and so grateful to have received this award from the Women in Toxicology Special Interest Group. This award will help with some of the costs associated with traveling to the SOT annual meeting, where she is presenting a poster on the research project she is currently working on, and the reason she was given this award. Presenting at a large scale conference allows her to network with researchers in the field of toxicology while learning more about current and up-and-coming research. As an undergraduate student aiming to pursue a PhD and a career in research, learning from others in the field is immensely beneficial to helping her navigate the world of science and determine where and how she can achieve her personal and scientific goals.

Currently, Ms. Salemme is using computer programs to sort and identify cellular functions within the body that are highly affected by exposure to environmental and occupational pollutants or chemicals. She has found that chemical exposure alters hormonal functions in the body, the innate immune response, and the use of lipids in the body. Other expected functions seen previously in a multitude of chemical exposure experiments were also found to be altered. This experiment will aid future researchers in determining the effects of chemicals on the body in ways previously unknown and unstudied. As a researcher, she hopes to use experiments such as this one to formulate new diagnostic methods for animals and humans, with a focus on chronic diseases and exposures.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Speer
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisville

Ms. Speer felt extremely honored to have received this award. She has always been passionate about supporting women in toxicology and encouraging women in the STEM fields. This award will help support her travel to the SOT meeting where she hopes to broaden the scope of her work and add to the quality of her research. She also hopes to meet other researchers to work with and collaborate with in the future.

Ms. Speer's research is in environmental toxicology focusing on how metals lead to carcinogenic endpoints. Her doctoral research has focused on how hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] affects human and wildlife health using a One Environmental Health Approach. This work is informative about how metals in the environment lead to adverse effects in humans, wildlife, and the environment. In the future she hopes to apply this approach to study how other environmental toxicants affect health by looking at different endpoints. This award was given for her research investigating Cr(VI) effects on the high fidelity DNA repair pathway, homologous recombination. This work investigates how Cr(VI) inhibits an essential protein in this pathway, RAD51, affecting its transcriptional regulation by the transcription factor E2F1. Specifically, Ms. Speer shows Cr may bind to acetylated lysine at promoter regions inhibiting transcription. This work is important because it helps identify a key mechanism of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis that may be applied to other carcinogenic pathways of Cr(VI) exposure.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Anne Turco
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Wisconsin Madison

Ms. Turco was extremely excited upon receiving this award. She will use this money to continue to pursue outreach opportunities. She purchases supplies for activities with students every year so a portion of these funds will go to purchasing these supplies to educate grade school children about toxicology.

Ms. Turco's PhD project is investigating the impact of an environmental contaminant on nerve density and smooth muscle contraction in the prostate. As men age, they experience difficulty urinating, but it is unknown why. One treatment is to prescribe drugs that relax prostate smooth muscle, but it is unknown why these drugs work. She has hypothesized that axons that control prostate smooth muscle contraction increase in density after exposure to an environmental contaminant to increase smooth muscle contraction and urinary symptoms. Ms. Turco's future career goals are pursuing a career as an independent toxicologist in industry. She won the present award for leadership and service during her graduate career. She is her graduate program's student leadership president and she organizes professional development seminars, the annual retreat, and authors the semi-annual newsletter. Lastly, she organizes her graduate program's outreach program. Further, Ms. Turco is the vice president of Graduate Women in Science (GWIS) Madison chapter where she organizes industry tours, authors the monthly newsletter, and organizes professional development events.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Rita-Josiane Gousesse
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: INRS - Institut Armand-Frappier

Ms. Gousesse was very honored and thankful. This prize was a real surprise for her because she did not expect it, it is an invaluable recognition of all her accomplishments. She was encouraged to work better to do an excellent job but also to get more involved in her community. This award represents a great recognition for her accomplishments and will help her to accomplish more to enable access to education that is for her, the undeniable form to support the current and future female and male toxicologist, and scientist leaders all around the world.

Brominated flame retardants (BFR) are chemicals added to consumer and household products to reduce their inflammability and ignition rate. Over the time, BFR leach out in the environment leading to human and wildlife exposure mainly through breathing and ingestion of house dust. The problem is that some of the BFR act as endocrine disruptors which are substances that mimic or block the action of endogenous hormone. Because of theses harmful properties, BFR can have adverse effects on human health. Moreover, when exposure occurs during pregnancy, it may increase the risks for the infants to develop heath disorders later-on in life. Therefore, it is important the understand the effects of this chronic exposure to BFR on human heath. Her project specifically aims to understand the effects of exposure to BFR on mammary gland development in mothers and their infants. They previously orally exposed female rats to different doses of an environmentally-relevant mixture of BFR, based on concentration found in house dust, through pregnancy and breastfeeding, leading to perinatal exposure of the pups. Their results show that exposure to BFR disrupts mammary cell-cell adhesion both in mothers and their pups. Overall, their results suggest that environmental hormonal imbalance disturbs mammary gland signaling during the pregnancy-breastfeeding cycle and the puberty which are sensitive periods for breast development and cancer. Their study raises important concerns about the consequences of environment hormonal disruption on long-term. Their current and future studies will enable us to better understand the effects of BFR exposure on mammary gland development and pathogenesis.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Lauren Lewis
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Ms. Lewis was honored to receive the Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award. She is very thankful for the support of the Society of Toxicology and the Women in Toxicology Specialty Section. This award will allow her to attend the annual SOT meeting to present her dissertation research. Attending this conference will be a great experience because she will be able to network and participate in idea sharing with experienced scientists from academia and industry. In addition to attending lectures and discussions about her area of research, she will also be exposed to other areas of toxicology that she is less familiar with. Presenting a poster at the SOT annual meeting will allow her to receive valuable feedback about her research project. She will also be able to participate in continuing education classes which can help her improve her research techniques and methodologies. Overall, attending this conference will be a fantastic opportunity for her to gain knowledge about her area of research, network, and help her stay at the forefront of her field of research.

Epigenetic reprogramming represents a major component of “genome instability” which is an enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. Exposure to chemical carcinogens can alter the chromatin landscape by inducing changes in DNA methylation, histone remodeling and alteration of microRNA expression. In addition, genetic variation can influence individual susceptibility to toxicants. Further investigation of the mechanistic link between the genome, epigenome, and DNA damage is necessary to understand inter-individual variability in response to environmental chemicals. In her research, she uses the model genotoxic carcinogen 1,3-butadiene to explore how the epigenome plays a role in individual susceptibility to genotoxic exposures. Her  goal is to characterize population variability in epigenetic and genotoxic effects of 1,3-butadiene in a population-based model.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Saniya Rattan
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

When Dr. Rattan received the email that she was awarded the Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award, she was in disbelief. Excitement and joy immediately followed when she realized that she was selected for this prestigious award. This award will greatly assist her research endeavors. She will be able to reduce the cost of attending the SOT Annual Meeting where she will get critical feedback on her research.

Dr. Rattan's research focuses on the effects of a plasticizer chemical, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). DEHP is found in common consumer goods that contain polyvinyl chloride plastic. She looked at how exposure to DEHP only during the second half of pregnancy in mice affects female reproduction. She specifically looked at the ovary in the daughters, grand daughters, and great-grand daughters of the exposed mothers. The specific research for which she won this award examines the pathways that DEHP disrupts in the ovaries of these generations. The pathways that DEHP disrupts in the ovaries vary in the generation, but overall her research indicates that the effects of DEHP differs in each generation. Additionally, her research indicates that DEHP exposure may cause these effects through DNA methylation.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Brittany Rickard
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of the Sciences

Ms. Rickard has said that receiving an award inspired by one of the early leaders in toxicology, Ms. Anne Wolven Garrett, is truly an honor. As an undergraduate student studying Pharmacology and Toxicology, she finds it incredible to think that she has been recognized as a woman in the early stages of developing her career in toxicology. Since this award is a tribute to one of the most notable women in the field, it is not only incredibly humbling, but it also proves to her that her passion for and dedication to toxicological research has not gone unnoticed. She plans to use this award to fund future research projects in various areas of the field with the hopes of presenting her findings at future scientific conferences, such as SOT.

Ms. Rickards's research at the University of the Sciences focuses on the biotransformation and toxicity of an agricultural fungicide known to cause liver necrosis in rats. Interestingly, this compound is structurally similar to the drug troglitazone, which was once used to treat type II diabetes until it was found to cause liver damage in humans. Currently, they are exploring the breakdown of this fungicide into its metabolites in the presence of various cell lines in order to understand the mechanism behind and structural feature(s) responsible for the observed toxicity. This project, along with other research opportunities that she has been lucky enough to receive, has inspired her to attend graduate school next fall. In graduate school, she hopes to expand on both her knowledge and research experience in toxicology, specifically focusing on how organ tissues are formed and how environmental or pharmaceutical compounds can impact their proper development.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Jessica Murray
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Receiving this award was incredibly exciting! Her lab is running short on funds, so this award will help cover travel expenses to future SOT meetings and supplies for her thesis project.

She studies the metabolic activation of nitroarenes, highly mutagenic components of diesel engine exhaust that may contribute to lung cancer risk. She uses high resolution mass spectrometry to identify metabolites of these compounds and resulting DNA adducts in human lung cell culture to identify human enzymes that lead to toxification events. She hopes to continue researching within the field of chemical carcinogenesis in an academic or government setting after receiving her PhD. She won this award in part due to her service and leadership at UPenn and SOT. In addition to her research, she is actively engaged in STEM outreach and have founded an organization that supplements existing STEM outreach organizations in Philadelphia with Pharmacology and Toxicology lessons and activities that help reinforce principles of Biology and Chemistry in a fun and approachable manner.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Samantha Snow
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: US EPA

She was beyond honored and excited to receive the Women in Toxicology SIG Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award! Reception of this prestigious award instills in her the confidence to keep pursing this line of research knowing that others in the field respect the novelty and importance of these findings, while at the same time validates the long hours and hard work she put in towards becoming an independent toxicologist.

Previous studies from her lab have shown that exposure to inhaled environmental irritants (ozone and acrolein) affects systemic metabolic homeostasis through activation of the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes to induce multi-organ metabolic alterations (i.e. impaired glucose homeostasis), which is likely a common mechanism for many chemical and non-chemical stressors. The purpose of her current research project is to use newly developed radio-telemetry technology, which is capable of providing real-time quantitative glucose and core body temperature data in conscious and unrestrained animals, to assess the impacts of ozone exposure across time and concentration. Most high-throughput technologies allow only a snapshot picture of biological processes, but not a multidimensional view of in-life, real-time dynamic biomolecular changes as environmental stressors are encountered. The use of these glucose monitoring implants provide an opportunity to acquire temporal data for blood glucose levels in freely-moving animals prior to, during, and following an exposure. The acquisition of these types of datasets are necessary for accurate elucidation of disease etiology and are critical for development of predictive, computational models of the adverse effects of environmental stressors. In the introductory study involving these glucose telemeters, she hypothesized that ozone exposure would impair normal circulating glucose rhythms in a concentration-dependent manner. Male, 13 week old Wistar-Kyoto rats (n=8), were implanted with HD-XG glucose telemeters (Data Sciences International, St. Paul, MN) and exposed to 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm ozone for 4h/day, 1 day/week for 4 consecutive weeks. A crossover design was used wherein all 8 implanted animals were exposed to each concentration with continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels, core body temperature, and locomotor activity throughout the entire 4-week period. Exposure to 0.8 ppm ozone caused a precipitous increase in blood glucose levels as core body temperature simultaneously decreased, approximately 1.5h after the beginning of exposure. Glucose tolerance testing performed immediately after exposure to filtered air and 0.8 ppm ozone further revealed ozone-induced impaired glucose tolerance. These data for the first time demonstrate the real-time temporal dynamics of ozone-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, this novel approach has the capacity to be amenable to a variety of environmental chemical and non-chemical stressors, allows for generation of a temporal data set without the need for using large numbers of laboratory animals, provides data critical for dynamic computational modeling strategies, introduces a new in vivo screening tool, and supports harmonization of risk assessment through common stress response mechanisms fundamental in systems biology that have not previously been studied in the context of environmental contaminants.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Suangsuda Supasai
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Davis

She was so glad when she heard that she was a recipient of SIG Cerebrating Women in Toxicology Award in 2018. This award is the highest honor not only for her but also for woman toxicologists/scientists in her home country, Thailand. She believes that this award will make her and also other woman scientists to voice louder for improving the scientific community in the future. Since she got the fellowship from her home country to study her PhD and earn outstanding research experiences in the United States, her future goal is clear to go back and contribute good research for better living and healthy environment in Thailand. This award will help her play important roles for national and international scientific research and make research collaboration in the future.

Her current research emphasis is investigation of pathogenic mechanisms by which acute intoxication with organophosphates (OPs) leads to long-term morbidity. As known, acute OP intoxication causes hundreds of thousands of death annually, and survivor of OP-induced status epilepticus (SE) face significant, long-term morbidity including cognitive deficits and recurrent seizure. Current medical countermeasures can decrease mortality, but does not protect against long-term deficits. The development of more effective neuroprotective strategies is stymied by limited understanding of persistent neuropathology following acute OP intoxication. Thus, her study is focusing on pathogenic mechanisms in OP-induced SE model to better understand molecular changes, leading to develop therapeutic strategy for mitigating neurologic sequelae in the future. In addition, her findings identify acute OP intoxication as a potential risk factor for neurodegenerative disease later in life. After 2018 SOT meeting, she will return to my home country to serve on the faculty in School of Tropical Medicine in Thailand. Her goal is to continue to conduct research related to toxicology, particularly in the context of issues prevalent in Thailand. OP pesticides, commonly used in many agricultural areas, are associated with increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases and, it is her hypothesis, these population may be also more susceptible to infection in tropical diseases such as dengue virus and malaria.

 

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Alison Sanders
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

She is honored to receive the 2017 postdoctoral CWIT award. For the last decade, she has dedicated her career to the field of toxicology and to developing the research, teaching and leadership skills that will carry her through her future academic career. SOT's recognition of her efforts through the CWIT award will undoubtedly help her to achieve her overarching career goal of becoming an independent investigator environmental perinatal health, and conducting research that will protect vulnerable populations from toxic insults. Her research focuses on how toxic metal exposure (e.g. lead, mercury, cadmium) during pregnancy alters epigenetic marks and molecular pathways of pediatric and later life hypertension. She has acquired interdisciplinary training ranging from geospatial statistics, computational and molecular biology, and epigenetic epidemiology to in vitro toxicology. During her pre- and postdoctoral training in environmental health, she applied these approaches to the study of birth defects and preterm birth, two leading causes of infant mortality in the US. She has published 16 peer-reviewed manuscripts (10 as first or last author). In a series of recent studies, she analyzed levels of 800 microRNAs in cervical samples collected from 80 pregnant women. She identified several candidate microRNAs and signaling pathways associated with lead exposure and shorter gestations. In parallel, she conducted analyses of 400 children in the same cohort with prenatal lead exposure and blood pressure measured at 4 years of age; she identified a significant positive relationship among children born preterm. It is this work that has inspired her current research, which investigates how prenatal metal exposure mediates childhood hypertension through epigenetic mechanisms, and the unique susceptibility of babies that are born prematurely. The knowledge gained will ultimately lead to a better understanding of epigenetic pathways in chronic disease and new avenues for therapeutic development.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Jessica Sapiro
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona/Wayne State University

Upon notification, she was quite pleased and honored that my research and leadership was found noteworthy and significant by colleagues in the Women in Toxicology Special Interest Group to be an award recipient. As a young and rising scientist and leader, it is important to see herself advancing in the field. SOT awards are quite competitive so being recognized as a strong researcher and leader to compete against her peers is quite rewarding. Acute renal injury is increasing in occurrence resulting from various compound exposure to the body and the formation of breakdown products in the body. It can present itself as a co-morbidity with other medical conditions in patients yielding a substantial concern. My dissertation work explores how a vitamin A metabolite, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), can protect against kidney injury. This work demonstrates that ATRA can induce several cellular stress proteins in its mechanism of protection. Specifically, the cellular stress kinase, ERK, plays a key role in the protection process. Based on our findings, we hope that ATRA and/or analogs thereof may serve as an effective therapeutic intervention in acute renal injury. Currently, we have established a cell culture model to assess ATRA cytoprotection and have generated mechanistic findings. This award will allow for more extensive mechanistic investigation exploring ERK activation and the continued development of a rodent model to assess ATRA protection. Following graduate school, she wishes to continue exploring the discovery and investigative toxicology space. The development of agents that have therapeutic potential against injuries and diseases is prominent in our goal of creating a safer and healthier world. In addition to kidney toxicity, it would be interesting to explore the development of a therapeutic agent that has clinical application to multiple organs. She also plans to continue in her future endeavors mentoring and training younger scientists to keep our field growing with fresh talent and innovation.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka Trivedi
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

She was really excited and pleased when she received this award. She immediately shared the good news with her advisor and also thanked him for all his support and encouragement. This award will provide recognition to her work and complement her research in the field of renal toxicology. She will use this award as a springboard for her career in which she will make important contributions to advancing our understanding of toxicology research. Her research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. In order to identify druggable targets, we performed RNA sequencing in mouse model of toxic kidney fibrosis and identified Phospholipase D4 (PLD4), a single pass transmembrane glycoprotein, as one of the highly up-regulated genes. Up-regulation of PLD4 was confirmed in three mechanistically distinct mouse models as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Mechanistically, we show that PLD4 facilitates fibrogenesis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses thereby promoting a TGF-ß signaling pathway. Moreover, PLD4 induced the expression of a1-antitrypsin protein (a serine protease inhibitor) that resulted in subsequent down-regulation of a protease neutrophil elastase (NE) expression, thereby leading to the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins. Interestingly, therapeutic targeting of PLD4 using specific siRNA also protected the mice from kidney fibrosis by inhibiting TGF-ß signaling and inducing NE expression. In conclusion, our findings identified PLD4 as a novel therapeutic target for kidney fibrosis - an unmet medical need. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the toxicological science, which can be directly applied clinically to benefit the society.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Kimberly Keil
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Davis

Neurodevelopmental disorders affect 1 in 10 children in the US and rates are increasing. Environmental factors are implicated in these disorders and are thought to interact with genetic susceptibilities. However, mechanisms by which environmental chemicals interact with genetic factors to confer individual risk remain a current knowledge gap in our understanding of these diseases. Epigenetic changes, which are modifications to DNA that alter gene expression without altering the DNA sequence, are one mechanism by which genes and environment may interact to influence individual neurodevelopmental disease risk; however, there is a paucity of experimental data in direct support of this mechanism. The goal of Dr. Keil's current research is to address this gap, yielding novel mechanistic data regarding not only the developmental neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are a current risk to the developing human brain, but also the role of the epigenome, specifically DNA methylation, in gene-environment interactions that confer risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Collectively, her results presented at the 2016 SOT meeting suggest that enzymes responsible for DNA methylation regulate basal dendritic growth in vitro and that their expression can be modified by PCB 95. These observations suggest DNA methyltransferase enzymes as a target of PCB developmental neurotoxicity that may represent a convergence point for gene-environment interactions that influence the risk and/or severity of neurodevelopmental disorders. This information is urgently needed to inform rational strategies for minimizing neurodevelopmental risk by mitigating relevant exposures and for identifying novel therapeutic targets and is an area she intends to pursue in her career goal of becoming a tenure track faculty member.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Dana Lauterstein
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: New York University

The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) during early life stages may pose a significant risk to the developing central nervous system, and Ms. Lauterstein's work seeks examine potential adverse outcomes associated with exposure to these products throughout gestation and lactation. Furthermore, this work addresses the emerging need for studies examining early life exposure to environmental toxicants and later adult disease. She has received this award for a portion of her doctoral work that she is presenting this year at SOT. For her project she exposed pregnant mice to aerosols produced from e-cigarettes with and without nicotine via whole body inhalation. The mice were exposed throughout gestation, and after birth both mothers and offspring were exposed to e-cigarette aerosols together throughout the lactational period. Following lactational exposure a subset of male and female offspring were sacrificed (~1-month-old at time of sacrifice) and RNA Sequencing was preformed on frontal cortex samples to examine global genomic changes. Subsequently, pathway analyses enabled the prediction of downstream biological outcomes associated with the observed changes in levels of gene expression. Results from this study demonstrated that e-cigarettes, both with and without nicotine, induced sex-dependent gene expression changes associated with predicted adverse neurobiological and neurobehavioral outcomes similar to those associated with early life exposure to the smoke from conventional cigarettes. Another subset of mice was used for behavioral testing in adulthood (done in collaboration with Dr. Cory-Slechta at the University of Rochester). She wishes to contribute much-needed research for the toxicological assessment of alternative tobacco products (ATPs). Many ATPs, including e-cigarettes, are being used widely in the U.S. and around the world today. Many, if not all of them pose sizeable health risks, but are not adequately studied and/or regulated and thus are perceived to have reduced harm when compared to conventional cigarettes. After she finishes her doctoral degree she would like to have a career in risk assessment for a regulatory agency where her work directly influences public health policy decisions. She also wishes to play a role in communicating scientific findings with the general public to further their knowledge of potential toxicological dangers in their environment.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Kristin Licko
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Water Quality Association

As the Toxicology Manager for the Water Quality Association, Ms. Licko collaborates with other members of the Joint Peer Review Steering Committee (JPRSC) which is comprised of representatives from competing ANSI accredited product certification bodies working together to reconcile and develop safe levels for chemicals found in drinking water treatment products. It is a delicate balance of sharing expenses, directives, and producing defensible criteria – in addition to all of our individual organizational priorities. We have made exceptional progress toward making sure all products are evaluated to the same safe levels, no matter where product certification is sought. In choosing this profession and expanding upon her education, she hopes to work to continue the directive of the JPRSC and improve her skills in order to develop risk assessments for chemicals we are exposed to that have not yet been evaluated.

Celebrating Women in Toxicology Award Fund

Recipient: Samantha Snow
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: US EPA

Dr. Snow's research focuses on investigating the adverse pulmonary, cardiovascular, and metabolic effects associated with exposure to gaseous pollutants in susceptible animal models, and determining the role stress hormones may play in these adverse responses. This current research explores the notion that dietary supplementation with fish oil or olive oil would attenuate ozone-induced metabolic impairments.

Daniel and Patricia Acosta Undergraduate Educator Award

Recipient: Wade H. Powell
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Kenyon College

Dr. Powell’s dedication to providing outstanding toxicological education to undergraduates makes him the ideal recipient of the 2019 SOT Daniel and Patricia Acosta Undergraduate Educator Award. After receiving his PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology from Emory University in 1997, Dr. Powell embarked on a career in toxicology, initially studying aryl hydrocarbon signal transduction in fish as a postdoctoral scholar in the Biology Department at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Since 2000, he has taught at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where he is now a professor of biology. Dr. Powell’s teaching activities use the entire life sciences curriculum to expose undergraduates from all levels and varied majors to different facets of toxicology. The molecular biology lab and environmental toxicology seminar are examples of Kenyon courses he instituted that enable students to engage in the field of toxicology directly, and his introductory classes are rich with toxicological examples and anecdotes. Dr. Powell’s most notable accomplishments involve the performance and promotion of research with undergraduates. Since 2001, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has funded Dr. Powell’s lab with multiple AREA grants, ensuring that the undergraduates composing his group have research opportunities that prepare them well for postgraduate careers. He has mentored more than 50 research students at Kenyon, many of whom have become active participants in the greater toxicology community. Twenty-three of his undergraduates, including several SOT award winners, have presented their research at the Society’s Annual Meetings, and all research publications from Dr. Powell’s group include undergraduate authors. His students’ success proves the effectiveness of Dr. Powell’s methods; they have become scientists, physicians, veterinarians, teachers, and public servants, continuing their education or launching careers at institutions such as the National Institutes of Health, Harvard University, Princeton University, and the Cleveland Clinic. Kenyon College has recognized Dr. Powell for his contributions to undergraduate education by bestowing upon him the Robert J. Tomsich Science Award and the Trustee Teaching Excellence Award, the most prestigious honor among Kenyon faculty. Dr. Powell also has served as an active and trusted member of the SOT Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and many of Dr. Powell’s learning resources are included in the SOT Undergraduate Toxicology Curriculum Resources database.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Milan Prajapati
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BPharm, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Brown University

Dr. Prajapati was honored and excited to receive a Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award. He believes that receiving this award is a professionally rewarding experience that will improve his professional skills, build professional networks, and help him achieve short- and long-term goals. The Society of Toxicology has provided him a unique platform to exchange scientific ideas and achieve productive interactions with other researchers. Such interactions have always led to constructive feedback on his research projects. He conveys sincere thanks to his mentor Dr. Bartnikas, SOT, and ASIO leadership for their time and dedication.

Dr. Prajapati's postdoctoral research was focused on identifying key molecular pathways of manganese toxicity using inherited mouse models of manganese excess. Manganese is an essential nutrient important for many biological functions. However, excess manganese can be detrimental and often leads to disease conditions. The first disease of inherited manganese excess was reported in 2012 due to mutations in SLC30A10 (also known as Znt10), a novel manganese transport protein. SLC30A10 mutation in patients is associated with hypermanganesemia, dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis. These phenotypes are attributed to manganese excess, however, the exact molecular mechanisms leading to these phenotypes have yet to be elucidated. To address this end, Dr. Prajapati has developed a mouse model of inherited manganese excess due to Slc30a10 deficiency that recapitulates key phenotypes of human disease (PMID: 31527311). He is using this inherited mouse model of manganese excess to identify key molecular pathways leading manganese toxicity. His research projects take advantage of novel techniques developed in molecular biology to advance the field of toxicology by shedding new light into the role of systemic manganese toxicity in the mammalian body. Dr. Prajapati's long-term research goal is to understand the mechanistic causes underlying human diseases of Mn excess and enable the development of efficient and targeted treatments for metal toxicity. The understanding of metal regulation, homeostasis, and toxicity mechanisms will provide new avenues for pharmacological interventions for patients experiencing inherited or environmental/occupational metal exposure leading to systemic toxicity. His long-term career goal is to contribute towards the future of scientific research in allied health sciences by establishing himself as tenure-track faculty. He enjoys teaching as it provides an opportunity for brainstorming new research ideas and sharing his love of science. In the future, Dr. Prajapati sees himself running his own research group solving fundamental issues about the interaction of these metals with the mammalian body. His plan for development towards an independent research career in metal biology involves the acquisition of new scientific skills in genetic engineering, biotechnology, pathology; career development training to include presentations at scientific meetings, the publication of research findings, mentoring students, and attending professional development workshops. His short-term goal is to secure independent research funding which will him achieve his long-term research and didactic goals.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Niyati Vaccharajani
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Dr. Vaccharajani was absolutely delighted and deeply honoured to have received this distinguished award. She is extremely passionate about her work and gaining recognition for it has motivated her to work even harder on this important research field. Recognition of her work through this prestigious award will enable her to promote the rapidly developing and challenging field of exosomes in the critical research area of drug-induced liver injury. In turn, this will enable Dr. Vaccharajani to discuss ideas, and potentially collaborate with leading scientists working on similar research areas, thus promoting interdisciplinary scientific endeavors. Additionally, Dr. Vaccharajani will be able to reach out to a wider community of international scientists working in toxicology - including those from India and those who are of Indian origin. She will also get a valuable opportunity to learn more about the on-going toxicology-based international research such as in countries like India.

Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major public health issue which impacts patients, healthcare providers, drug developers, and drug regulators. Moreover, idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) is the most problematic form of DILI as it occurs only very rarely among treated patients and often only after several weeks or months of treatment with the offending drug. As a result, this liability is typically detected only late in clinical development. Dr. Vaccharajani's current work will help support the prediction and understanding of IDILI, thereby reducing the potential for patient harm and the cost of drug development. Her professional goal is to make strides in a medically-relevant research field that identifies, as well as correctly interprets, early signals of debilitating human diseases - thereby preventing them all together. She hopes to achieve this goal by being a research scientist in the pharmaceutical sector. Dr. Vaccharajani had previously demonstrated alterations in hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDEs) prior to and in the absence of overt necrosis associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI). HDEs contain miRNAs and proteins which may possess value in the form of sensitive and specific biomarkers for IDILI liability. The objective of this project was to identify HDE-based biomarkers of IDILI by profiling protein and miRNA changes in primary human hepatocytes exposed to subtoxic and toxic concentrations of IDILI compounds.Through her research, she has identified 4 potential biomarkers of IDILI in HDEs which she is currently in the process of validating.The findings of this study are novel as several of the candidate biomarkers have not been previously reported in HDE and/or to be altered in response to IDILI. Importantly, the HDE-based candidate biomarkers identified in this study may be utilized to refine existing in vitro assays for improving IDILI predictions.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Manushree Bharadwaj
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: DVM, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: CVM, FDA

This award recognizes not just Dr. Bharadwaj's work but her lab and her advisors' support as well. This award helped her in defraying some of the travel cost to attend the meeting as she was not able to find another funding source.

BPAF is an industrial chemical used to make plastic and we all get exposed to it. Dr. Bharadwaj studied the role of BRAF in developmental toxicity. The next step is to perform transcriptomis to assess the early on gene changes that may have occurred due to BPAF exposure.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Bharat Bhushan
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Bhushan was really excited upon receiving this award. This award will help him get recognition in the Society of Toxicology, which is very crucial for a research carrier.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Shanthi Ganesan
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Postdoc
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

She is delighted to receive Dr. Dharm Singh Postdoctoral Fellow Best Abstract Award. She believes that this award will help her to continue her research passion in toxicology field to identify other pesticides and chemicals and its toxic effects in mammals.

She has focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemical-induced infertility using an in vitro ovarian culture, a cell culture, and an in vivo obese model. Currently she is working on Glyphosate (GLY), which is used to control weeds (herbicide) in agriculture throughout the world. GLY has been found in breast milk, and pregnant women’s blood, indicating human exposure through contaminated food, water and air. An epidemiological study in humans carried out in the USA showed a modest association between GLY exposure and infertility in agriculture-rich regions. Thus, she is investigating the mechanisms of glyphosate-induced infertility in women. Up to this point, she has found that glyphosate impairs ovarian function by altering ovarian follicular development and steroid hormone synthesis in female ovaries. Her future study will be conducted to characterize the mechanisms of glyphosate-induced infertility and birth defects with regards to DNA damage. As a toxicologist, her life time goal is to identify various toxic chemicals and their levels in the environment, help raise awareness, and enforce rules and regulations to control the usage of those chemicals.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nithya Mariappan
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Alabama at Birmingham

This award will be a vital recognition of her research endeavor and will motivate her for further and deeper research in the field of toxicology. It will also provide her with platform from where she can establish channels of communication among other scientists and leaders in the field of toxicology to share new research ideas as well as her professional growth.

Acute lung injury (ALI) through exposure to toxic chemicals/warfare reagents causes life-threatening respiratory failure in humans. Among the available chemical warfare agents, sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, has been widely used as a chemical weapon. It is a strong alkylating agent and exposure to SM causes a variety of detrimental effects including airway injury with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. However, there is limited information as to how mustard gas causes severe multi-organ damage years after a single exposure. A variety of treatment modalities including antioxidants, anti-inflammatory drugs and others have failed to provide promising therapeutic benefits. To address this gap, they used 2-chloroethyl-ethyl sulfide (CEES), an analog of SM, and found that CEES exposure enhances the release of circulating nucleic acids and determined that this mechanism forms the basis of underlying inflammation and lung toxicity. Importantly, administration of hexadimethrine bromide (HDMBr), a nucleic acid scavenger and anti-inflammatory agent, mitigated the toxic effects of CEES. As such, they have found that HDMBr plays a pivotal role in attenuating CEES-induced lung injury and inflammation. She strongly believes that this research will establish a strong foundation for her research career and lead to our society. She wishes to continue her career in academic research in the field of pulmonary toxicology and she would regard her selection for this award not only as a great honor, but also as a great responsibility and an obligation to continue working hard.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sunitha Meruvu
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Ph.D.
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

She felt extremely honored and inspired by this award to do more outstanding research which is recognized and helps advance toxicology research. She felt immensely encouraged as a scientist of Indian origin to achieve success in the USA and contribute significantly to the field of Toxicology. Also, receiving this award provided her a great opportunity to attend the 2018 SOT Meeting where she can present and share her work with other prominent scientists working in the same area, and also build valuable networks. Winning this award significantly adds to her accomplishments in the scientific community and helps her in achieving the assistant professorship she is looking forward to in future.

She studies the effects of phthalates or plasticizers (widely used environmental chemicals) and their epigenetic role in placental diseases. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that women with pregnancy complications, such as preterm birth, preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), have higher than normal levels of phthalates in the body. Presently, she is working on an interesting and novel aspect of phthalate mode of action which is the induction of hypoxia in the placenta. Preeclampsia (PE) which affects 5-8% of pregnancies worldwide, is usually associated with increased placental hypoxia/ischemia. MiR-210-3p (hypoxamir) has been previously shown to be up-regulated in PE placentas. Based on these observations, they hypothesized that mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), a commonly used plasticizer, can induce hypoxia effects in human placental cells. In their studies on a human placental cell line, they have observed that MEHP is capable of inducing hypoxia by stabilizing HIF-1α, which upregulates miR-210-3p, which in turn disrupts ATP synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. This is the first study that suggests a potential mechanism mediated by MEHP through miR-210-3p and HIF-1α that could induce preeclampsia in pregnant mothers when exposed to this endocrine disruptor. The observations and results of this study are presented in the abstract that she submitted and for which she received the Dr. Dharm Singh Postdoctoral Fellow Best Abstract Award. Receiving the ASIO-SOT postdoctoral fellow award for the best abstract is a great asset to her and will undoubtedly enhance the process of her getting an academic position in the fall semester. As the mission of ASIO-SOT is to enhance collegiality, fellowship, networking, and professional development of scientists of Indian origin, it is an honor for her to get this award which will encourage her to aspire to higher career goals.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Satya Achanta
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: DVM, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Duke University School of Medicine
Dr. Achanta feels honored to receive this prestigious award. As an aspiring scientist, this award will be a feather in his hat and give him more enthusiasm to pursue toxicological research. The treatment of chlorine gas induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Chlorine gas is a severe chemical threat agent with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents (for example, train derailment in Graniteville, SC, 2005). Recent chlorine bomb attacks in Syria resulted in a death toll of several thousands. Despite its known chemical threat potencies since World War I, there is no specific antidote for chlorine gas. They examined the therapeutic effects of a novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) inhibitor, GSK691, in pigs exposed to chlorine gas as a translational model of human chemically induced acute lung injury to meet the US FDA’s animal rule.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka Trivedi
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
She was really excited and pleased when she received this award. She immediately shared the good news with her advisor and also thanked him for all his support and encouragement. This award will provide recognition to her work and complement my research in the field of renal toxicology. She will use this award as a springboard for my career in which she will make important contributions to advancing our understanding of toxicology research. Her research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. In order to identify druggable targets, they performed RNA sequencing in mouse model of toxic kidney fibrosis and identified Phospholipase D4 (PLD4), a single pass transmembrane glycoprotein, as one of the highly up-regulated genes. Up-regulation of PLD4 was confirmed in three mechanistically distinct mouse models as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Mechanistically, they show that PLD4 facilitates fibrogenesis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses thereby promoting a TGF-ß signaling pathway. Moreover, PLD4 induced the expression of a1-antitrypsin protein (a serine protease inhibitor) that resulted in subsequent down-regulation of a protease neutrophil elastase (NE) expression, thereby leading to the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins. Interestingly, therapeutic targeting of PLD4 using specific siRNA also protected the mice from kidney fibrosis by inhibiting TGF-ß signaling and inducing NE expression. In conclusion, their findings identified PLD4 as a novel therapeutic target for kidney fibrosis - an unmet medical need. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the toxicological science, which can be directly applied clinically to benefit the society.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Ratanesh Seth
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina
With obesity becoming a global pandemic and more than a third are obese in this country, Dr. Seth's research focusing on the environmental toxins as potentiators of hepatotoxicity and disease has monumental significance. He has established the novel link between environmental toxin bromodichloromethane and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH). Though environmental contaminants and NASH development is known, the mechanisms remain unclear. His research has established that environmental toxin bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a disinfection byproduct of drinking water causes NASH and hepatic metabolic reprogramming, mediated by cytochrome P450 isoform CYP2E1 and adipokine leptin in an underline condition of obesity. In his current project, he investigated the molecular mechanism of transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 4 (TRPV4) regulating inflammation and Kupffer cell activation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by attenuation of CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress. Nitric oxide regulates CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial injury and attenuate NASH progression. Based on the above, targeting TRPV4 or its downstream signaling cascade might be a promising therapeutic strategy in NASH. He is sure that these findings are prooving to be very significant and novel to the field of liver disease research.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka  Trivedi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Dr. Trivedi's research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. Kidney fibrosis, the hallmark of the chronic kidney disease (CKD), is an irreversible process leading to the life-threatening end-stage renal failure. Unfortunately, no effective therapeutic strategies are available to cure this condition. This is due to lack of our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis. Using RNA sequencing, we identified phospholipase D4 (PLD4) as one of the targets for the treatment of kidney fibrosis. Our research work deciphers a mechanistic role of PLD4 in the regulation of fibrosis. We observed that PLD4 was significantly increased in mechanistically different mouse models of kidney fibrosis as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Further, we found that PLD4 knockout mice (PLD4-/-) showed less fibrosis compared to the wild type (PLD4+/+) mice after folic acid injection- as well as unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney fibrosis. This was attributed to mainly two reasons, (i) PLD4-/- mice had increased level of anti-fibrotic cytokines compared to the PLD4+/+ mice and, (ii) sustained activation of the proteases, due to decreased level of serpina1 (a protease inhibitor) in PLD4-/- mice, led to an efficient degradation of collagen rescuing these mice from scar tissue formation in the kidney. Thus we identified that PLD4 is a central target that can be intervened in preventing fibrosis-associated organ dysfunction. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the mechanistic toxicological sciences, which can be translated clinically.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amrendra Ajay
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Amrendra Ajay is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Medical School who received the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund for his work entitled, "SMOC2 mediates kidney fibrosis via activating fibroblasts." Kidney toxicity is a major problem worldwide causing high mortality every year. Due to lack of therapeutic targets and early and sensitive biomarker it’s impossible to detect and treat chronic kidney diseases. He and his group employed RNA sequencing approach to find out the early and sensitive biomarker and therapeutic target for chronic kidney injury. His research will use in vitro and in vivo models to find out the mechanistic aspects of compounds related to different class of compounds. To ding out the signaling events that can be useful to stratify the compounds. In some cases drug metabolites are toxic to kidney once metabolized by liver. Using in vitro molecular tools may provide important insight into the mechanism of toxicity of drugs. Toxicity due to unknown compounds is also one of the emerging problems where it’s found that epidemically there is occurrence of kidney, liver or other organ toxicity.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Ratanesh Seth
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: Ph.D.
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina
Ratanesh Seth is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of South Carolina and received the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund for his work entitled "M1 Polarization bias and subsequent toxicity-induced NASH progression is attenuated by nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate." He mainly works on diet-induced obese models to understand how drinking water disinfection by products, specifically bromodicholromethane potentiate induces progression of steatosis to silent stage nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. In this awarded study he looked into how our internal defense machinery (immune system), specially macrophages regulate the disease progression so that we can identify therapeutic targets which may help in curing the disease.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Gul Mustafa
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas Medical Branch
Gul Mustafa is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Texas Medical Branch and received the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Award for her work entitled, “Discovery and Validation of Serum Protein Biomarker Candidates for Early Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC).” The impetus behind the study was that development of a simple and reliable screening tool for early HCC detection which stems from the recognition that early detection is critical for therapeutic efficacy-late detection normally associated with clinical presentation of symptoms comes with a poor prognosis and 5 year survival rates of less than 5%. She hopes that in the future the discovery and validation of these biomarkers will make earlier detection more feasible, which will enable clinicians to offer patients better clinical management and more effective treatment. She hopes that physicians will use proteomics analyses at many points in the management of disease in addition to enhance drug development.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nagender Reddy Panyala
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Nagender Reddy Panyala is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and received the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Award for his work entitled “Identification of Unknown Impurities in the Decorporation Agent 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) Using UPLC Xevo-TOF MSMS Instrumentation” His research showed that unknown trace impurities in the decorporation drug (which removes internally deposited toxic radioactive nuclides from the body after an accidental intake) using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) instrumentation and elucidated their structure using structural elucidation softwares. This structural information is very fundamental to know toxicity of trace impurities and their effect on drug activity especially at the preclinical stage. He hopes play a key role in advancing the toxicology in the 21st century as a potential toxicologist by developing scientific collaborations, staying abreast of current toxicology and integrating ideas from expert scientists in other fields as well as to explore more resources for aid his research in the field of toxicology.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amrendra Ajay
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Amrendra Ajay is a postdoctoral student of the Harvard Medical School and is the recipient of the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award for his work entitled, “Systems Biology Approach Identifies Transcriptional Regulator of Kidney Injury Molecule-1.” His work focused on the regulator or Kidney Injury Molecule -1 (KIM-1). KIM-1 is expressed by kidney tubular epithelial cells and is excreted in the urine following kidney injury. It is a qualified biomarker for kidney injury. Using their gene expression data Dr. Ajay and his group used the bioinformatics approach that predicted STAT3 and Chk1 as upstream regulators of KIM-1. They used molecular and immunological techniques to prove the mechanism of KIM-1 regulation. They showed that Chk1 phosphorylates STAT3 binds on the KIM1 promoter for its transcription. Finally using genetic and pharmacological inhibition approaches Dr. Ajay and his colleagues confirmed the regulation of KIM-1 by STAT3 and Chk1 in human proximal tubular epithelial and renal cell carcinoma cells. The award will help him obtain further funding and become an independent scientist.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Aditya Joshi
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas Medical Branch
Aditya Joshi is a postdoctoral student of the University of Texas Medical Branch and received the Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award for his work entitled, “Transcription Regulation by Novel Interaction of Kruppel-like Factor 6 with Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor at the NC-XRE.” His research showed a novel interaction of well known anti cancer protein Kruppel like factor 6 (KLF6) that interacts with another protein aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR regulates adaptive and toxic responses to variety of chemical pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, most notably 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Therefore AhR-KLF6 complex may contribute to dioxin-mediated carcinogenesis, particularly given the documented role for both proteins in cell cycle control. His long-term goal is to become an academic investigator with a focus on molecular toxicology and carcinogenesis.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kartik Balachandran
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard University, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
Kartik Balachandran, of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, for his work entitled, “Valve Thin Films: A Novel Assay for Safety Evaluation of Cardiac Valve Function.” His work presents a novel in vitro cardiac valve-on-chip for the analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) on cardiac valve function. This "valve thin film" assay can be used during drug discovery and as supporting data for animal experiments in safety pharmacology studies. He hopes the work he is doing will play a potentially valuable role in accelerating drug development by providing a quick and efficient way to weed out candidate molecules with potential toxic or other adverse effects. He also hopes that such in vitro assay systems will eventually supplement or even replace expensive animal studies in the drug development and approval process.

Dharm V. Singh Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Neera Tewari-Singh
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Colorado Denver
Neera Tewari-Singh, of University of Colorado Denver for her abstract titled "Therapeutic Efficacy of Silibinin in Attenuating Sulfur Mustard Analog-Induced Skin Injuries." She plans to continue her research on the chemical warfare agents that pose a probable threat as weapons of warfare and terrorism. This award has not only given her enthusiasm to continue to develop therapeutics to treat skin injuries by chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, but also made many other people aware of her research accomplishments. This will further help her in developing meaningful collaborations, discussion and incorporation of ideas from other scientists who are experts in other fields, as well as to explore more resources for funding opportunities.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Qiran Chen
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD Candidate
Institution/Affiliation: Indiana University School of Public Health

Ms. Chen's study aims to develop a new method to quantify the dose-response relationship of carcinogens. Besides the liver tumors induced by TCDD, the precursor events are also included in the assessment instead of using a single specific event for dose-response assessment in the current approach. This work can overcome some limitations of current approach to dose-response assessment from a biological perspective. It will also provide for more meaningful scientifically-based cancer risk assessment.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Md Sanaullah Sajib
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MPharm
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Mr. Sajib was both delighted and honored to receive the award. This will help him in attending the SOT conference and learn about the latest advancements in the field.

Cancer generally starts at a site of the body. When it spreads to other organs it is called 'cancer metastasis'. This spreading occurs through the blood vessels. In his research project, Mr. Sajib has investigated one of the pathways that the cancer cells exploit to travel in and out of blood vessels. He has found that the cancer cells activate 'RhoA-ROCK' pathway of endothelium (the inner cell lining of blood vessels). By using various techniques including animal models, he has shown that metastasis can be reduced by blocking this pathway in endothelial cells.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Jennifer Toyoda
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisville

When Ms. Toyoda received the award notice, her heart raced with excitement, and she found it rewarding to see the evidence build for the role of centrosome amplification in the carcinogenic mechanism for hexavalent chromium. This award motivates her to improve communication about the studies she is pursuing and she is excited to show SOT attendees next year what else she has learned.

Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known lung carcinogen with environmental and occupational exposure risks, yet the carcinogenic mechanism of hexavalent chromium is unknown. A key mechanism for Cr(VI) carcinogenesis is induction of chromosome instability, including changes in chromosome number which can arise due to centrosome amplification. Centrosome amplification is observed in many types of cancers and is present in neoplasias, tumors, and is associated with aggressive cancers. Ms. Toyoda's study examines centrosome amplification in Cr(VI)-exposed human lung cells and human lung tissue, and investigates the mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced centrosome disruption in human lung cells. Her hypothesis is Cr(VI) disrupts proteins that regulate centrosome duplication, leading to centriole disengagement and centrosome amplification. This study shows Cr(VI) exposure causes centrosome amplification in human lung cells, and she also observed centrosome amplification in Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors. Cr(VI) exposure causes centriole disengagement, which is a key driver of centrosome over-duplication. Additionally, key proteins that inhibit centriole disengagement, securin and cyclin B1, are decreased after Cr(VI) exposure. Together, these data demonstrate prolonged Cr(VI) exposure induces centriole disengagement, centrosome amplification, and causes decreased levels of proteins that inhibit centriole disengagement. Ongoing studies using securin and separase siRNA knockdown, as well as an animal inhalation model are elucidating the role of these proteins in the Cr(VI) carcinogenic mechanism.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Keshav Karki
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Mr. Karki was very excited and felt very honored to receive this award. He thanked the committee 'Carcinogenesis SS Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Graduate Student Award Endowment Award', the SOT and his PI for making this happen.

Mr. Karki's research is primarily focused on drug discovery and development for glioblastoma. He discovered a new gene in glioblastoma which acts as a driver for glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion. He is currently working to identify the drug target for that particular gene. His future goal is to investigate the key pathways that are associated with that particular gene. He applied for the research entitled 'Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) as a Drug Target for Treating Glioblastoma'. Glioblastoma patients have limited treatment options and poor prognosis and there is an urgent need to develop new chemotherapeutic approaches for treating this disease and identifies less toxic mechanism-based therapeutics. He has demonstrated that NR4A2 knockdown affects several critical oncogenic pathways and genes in patient-derived GBM cell lines. CDIM12 is NR4A2 antagonist and decrease NR4A2-dependent cell growth, proliferation and invasion and related genes indicating that CDIM 12 is a potent NR4A2 antagonist in cell culture and animal models. Mr. Karki posits that therefore, the NR4A2 antagonists represent a new class of mechanism-based anticancer agents for the treatment of glioblastoma as standalone drugs or in drug combinations for patients that express the receptor.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Sumira Phatak
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Utah State University

Ms. Phatak was honored to be selected for such a prestigious award that greatly facilitated her attendance at the 2019 SOT meeting. Her long-term career goal is to attain a faculty position at a major research university, optimizing lifestyle intervention strategies that influence cancer outcome. She has stated that recognition by experts in her field is humbling and it reignites her motivation to continue working hard towards accomplishing her career goals.

The overall objective of Ms. Phatak's dissertation is to determine how exposure to the Western dietary pattern across multiple generations impacts colorectal cancer (CRC) outcome, epigenome programming, and gut microbiome composition. Deep frying foods damages macromolecule components and contributes to the formation of several toxic compounds known to negatively influence health outcomes, increasing CRC risk. She conducted a preclinical study, investigating how consumption of deep fried oil in combination with a Western diet impacts CRC outcome. The unexpected observation that deep fried oil disrupted glucose regulation in the context of a Western diet prompted further investigation of hepatic function via gene expression analysis on the Fluidigm Biomark platform, using novel reference genes for normalization.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Sharavan Ramachandran
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Dr. Ramachandran was overwhelmed to receive this prestigious award. It has inculcated confidence and positivity in his research. This award will invigorate his career prospects and is a great acknowledgment of his research. He really felt honored to be acknowledged by Carcinogenesis Specialty Section. Dharm V. Singh Graduate Endowment Award aided his research to be showcased on a global arena. Moreover, he was pleased that this award aided him in covering his conference-related expenses. 

Dr. Ramachandran's research is based on investigating the usage of Pimavanserin, an anti-Parkinson drug in pancreatic cancer. Current treatment options for pancreatic cancer have failed due to the development of resistance towards these options. So, a novel treatment option is needed to combat the progression of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, Pimavanserin could serve as a novel treatment option for pancreatic cancer.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Sreedhar Reddy Suthe
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BPharm
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Mr. Suthe was excited and happy about receiving this award. He knew this would be a very competitive award as he attended 2018 SOT in San Antonio and saw some wonderful work being recognized. He thanks the committee for this wonderful award.

In this work, his aim was to target Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) because of the lack of targeted treatment options. He was successful in establishing the RON receptor as a validated target which could be useful for TNBC patients in the future.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Ian Huck
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS Microbiology
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center

Mr. Huck was honored to learn he received support throught the Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund. This award will allow him to attend the 2018 SOT Annual Meeting and receive feedback from experts. This meeting always provides new ideas and refreshed perspective for ongoing projects in the lab and he is grateful to the SOT Endowment Fund for their support.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs in 20-30% of the population in western countries and is increasing worldwide. NAFLD patients are at high risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been shown that the persistent organic pollutants perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) can induce hepatomegaly, hepatic steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents. Furthermore, previous studies from his laboratory have shown that PFOA and PFOS decrease expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4a (HNF4a), the master regulator of hepatic differentiation. Loss of HNF4a is associated with increased HCC pathogenesis. Based on these data, he and his team hypothesized that exposure to persistent organic pollutants PFOA and PFOS may exacerbate disease progression to severe forms of liver disease such as HCC in patients with existing fatty liver disease. To test this hypothesis they fed mice either a normal diet or high fat diet with and without environmentally relevant doses of PFOA or PFOS. As expected, PFOA and PFOS induced hepatic steatosis in normal diet fed mice. To their surprise, PFOA and PFOS exposure was protective against hepatic fat accumulation in the mice fed high fat diet. To explore possible mechanisms behind this unexpected finding, they examined expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. PFOA and PFOS treatment affected expression of lipid trafficking genes in a pattern favoring hepatocyte fat accumulation in normal diet conditions, which was reversed in high fat conditions. Included in these genes were targets of HNF4α, a nuclear receptor known to bind fatty acids. Examination of HNF4α target genes unrelated to metabolism suggests PFOA and PFOS inhibit HNF4α activity in normal diet conditions. In high fat diet conditions, HNF4α activity is restored, perhaps because fatty acids competitively exclude PFOA and PFOS from the ligand binding pocket of HNF4α. The findings provide evidence for inhibition of a known tumor suppressor (HNF4α) in a diet dependent manner. This study highlights the importance of taking into account environmental variables (diet) when assessing the tumor promoting effects of a chemical.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Xilin Li
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Indiana University

Dr. Li was writing his PhD dissertation when he learned he received this award. He would like to express his sincere gratitude to Dr. Dharm V. Singh, the founder of the award, and the selection committee for choosing him as the recipient of the Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Endowment Graduate Student Award. This award is a great honor to him and he was humbled to be selected. He has always been interested in the mechanisms of chemical induced liver tumors and their application for human risk assessment. He is tremendously fortunate to have his mentor, Dr. James E Klaunig, who has been working on carcinogenesis for more than 35 years. All of Dr. Li's works would be impossible without Dr. Klaunig's guidance, inspiration, and thoughtful feedback. This award will keep encouraging him to dedicate his career in the research of chemical carcinogenesis.

The abstract is mainly on the topic of how the exposure to drugs or chemicals may influence on the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which has become a major public health burden that affects up to one third of adult general population in western countries. Non-alcoholic fatty liver may progress to advanced stages such as steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. In this abstract, he and his team showed the pre-existing fatty liver might enhance the adverse effects (cell proliferation, inflammation, activation of xenobiotic nuclear receptors) induced by perfluorooctanoate, a drinking water contaminant regulated by EPA. Such effects have important implications for the risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Due to the epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndromes, the prevalence of fatty liver is expected to increase in the future. Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease might be more susceptible to the inflammatory and carcinogenic effect of chemical exposure, and need special attention in future risk assessment.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Sumira Phatak
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Utah State University

Ms. Phatak is both honored and humbled to be selected for such a prestigious award that greatly facilitates her attendance at the SOT Annual Meeting. She looks forward to meeting other members of the CSS, allowing her to network with leaders in the field and enhance her skill set. She sees this as an opportunity to open new doors that lead to the next chapter of her career.

As a graduate student in the Benninghoff Laboratory, her innovative work explores the connection between nutrition, colon cancer, and epigenetic modifications. Immediately after arriving at Utah State, she began a multi-generational rodent study; having completed the preclinical portion, she recently moved on to a molecular investigation of mechanisms. The findings from this project will answer her questions about how the standard American diet influences the health outcome of grand-offspring, despite never being directly exposed themselves.  Ultimately, she sees herself running her own research program that answers essential questions about how diet impacts disease states while optimizing lifestyle intervention strategies.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Nehal Gupta
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MPharm, BPharm
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Ms. Gupta was very excited and enthusiastic after receiving Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Graduate Student Award. She would like to thank SOT for selecting her for this award. This award would offer a tremendous financial support to attend the 2017 SOT Annual Meeting. It will be an excellent opportunity to meet scientists across the globe and share her work with them, which will provide novel insights to her work. Also, Recognition by award committee has boosted her morale to do better work in the field of toxicology as well as science. She started her project on breast cancer, which is one of the most malignant carcinoma in women worldwide. Despite of currently available treatment options, breast cancer kills approximately 40,000 women every year, making it the second-leading cause of cancer related deaths. Resistance to current chemotherapeutics is the major obstacle in treating breast cancer patients. She and colleagues developed resistance towards paclitaxel in various breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, 4T1, HCC1806). With extensive research, they are able to unravel the mechanism behind the resistance and based on previous publication (Ranjan et al. “Penfluridol: An antipsychotic agent suppresses metastatic tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer by inhibiting integrin signaling axis” Cancer Research 2015), they are able to develop penfluridol as a treatment option to overcome resistance. Their results showed that penfluridol treatment synergistically enhanced the growth suppressive effects of paclitaxel in vitro as well as in vivo. They also observed that chronic treatment of mice with penfluridol was not associated with any toxicity or behavioral side effect. Therefore, combining penfluridol with paclitaxel will reduce the dose as well as toxic side effects of current chemotherapy. Since penfluridol is an FDA approved drug, the pharmacology, formulation and potential toxicities are already known. Their preclinical studies can fasten the clinical trial and review by Food and Drug Administration. This could bring relief to the patients with highly lethal and resistant breast tumors. For her long term goals, she would like to develop her professional career as an academic scientist in the field of Oncology. She has been mentored by one student that gave her motivation to train new researchers in cancer field.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Alisa Suen
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: NIEHS/UNC Chapel Hill
Currently Ms. Suen is a 4th year PhD student in the Curriculum in Toxicology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her research is performed in the laboratory of Carmen Williams, a UNC-Chapel Hill adjunct faculty member who is a Clinical Investigator in the Reproductive and Developmental Biology Laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in RTP, NC. She won the CSS Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Endowment Award for her research on aberrant SIX1 expression in a developmental mouse model of hormonal carcinogenesis. During her dissertation research, she plans to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the development of endometrial carcinoma following neonatal exposure to estrogenic chemicals. Her research will focus on the oncoprotein, sine oculis homeobox 1 (SIX1), a developmentally important and cancer-associated transcription factor that becomes overexpressed in the uteri of mice treated neonatally with the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), or the phytoestrogen, genistein. Her hypothesis is that persistent uterine SIX1 expression contributes to the cancer phenotype observed in this mouse model of hormonal carcinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, she designed a series of experiments to investigate the role of SIX1 in cancer development and the mechanisms by which neonatal estrogenic chemical exposure induces uterine SIX1 expression. She plans on pursuing an industry career focusing on drug discovery related to reproductive health, or reproductive/developmental toxicity testing.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Elizabeth Lightbody
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BScH
Institution/Affiliation: Queen's University Cancer Research Institute
Elizabeth Lightbody is a graduate student with the Queen's University Cancer Research Institute and received the Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award for her work entitled, "PPAR? Loss Increases Metastatic Potential of HER2+ Breast Tumours in Mammary Epithelial Targeted Knockout Mice." Her research project investigates the link between the ligand-activated transcription factor PPAR? to the poor prognosis in patients with breast tumours that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2+). Her epithelial-specific HER2 overexpressing PPAR? knockout mouse model has shown increased lung metastases, suggesting that a loss of PPAR? may enhance the metastatic potential of HER2+ breast tumours to the lung. This project will unveil novel PPAR? upstream and downstream targets that may be used as predictive biomarkers for HER2+ breast tumour patients susceptible to increased metastasis, and lay a foundation for similar studies in other human breast tumour subtypes. She is interested in the potential of drugs to be repurposed for different diseases and was drawn to work that focuses on using thiazolidinedione drugs that were previously used in the clinical setting to treat and prevent type II diabetes. These drugs are now implicated to have chemotherapeutic potential. Through increased knowledge of drug re-purposing and combination therapies she hopes to advance the science of toxicology to create an improved response rate and overall survival for these poor prognosis patients.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Christal Lewis
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences
Christal Lewis is a Graduate Student at Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences and reveived the Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award for her work entitled, “In Utero Exposure of F-344 Rats to Low Levels of Dietary Zeranol Induces Transgenerational Effects on Sexual Development and Susceptibility to Chemically-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.”Her work entails a transgenerational study, treating pregnant rats with zeranol to see if it has an effect in physical and developmental changes to subsequent generations. Her research is attempting to create a healthier way to look at the effect of food additives and steroids across generations in hopes that people will be more cautious with the food intake and consumption. She also seeks to be an advocate in the field of consumed carcinogens in all populations but especially the urban or disadvantaged populations.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Chad Walesky
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center
Chad Walesky is a PhD candidate at the University of Kansas Medical Center and he received the Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award for his work entitled, “Deletion of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha Promotes Diethylnitroasmine-induced Carcinoma.” His work focused on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis within the liver with a primary focus on hepatocellular carcinoma. He and his colleagues investigated the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha within a classic model of hepatic carcinogenesis and found that livers which lack this factor are more susceptible to cancer development and progression. The award allowed him to attend the SOT Annual Meeting to gain feedback on this research and the award will further his reputation in the research community. He hopes to become an independent academic research scientist.

Dharm V. Singh Carcinogenesis Award Fund

Recipient: Sara Nowinski
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: Austin College of Pharmacy
Sara M. Nowinski, of Austin College of Pharmacy, for her research entitled, “Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 3 (UCP3) Antagonizes Epidermal Tumor Promotion and Growth Signaling.” Her ongoing experiments aim to define the molecular mechanism(s) underlying chemoprevention in this model, and to further our understanding of the interactions between metabolic changes and canonical oncogenic cell signaling pathways. One of her career goals as a toxicologist is to one day hold a position as a professor at an academic institution. She wants to continue to use her knowledge of toxicology and cancer biology, and use cutting-edge techniques to study mechanisms of carcinogenesis in her own lab.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Dalisa Kendricks
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Auburn University

Upon receiving this award, Ms. Kendricks was more than a little excited and immediately announced it to her mentor. This award is important for her to receive the necessary training to both complete her dissertation project and to give her the necessary skills for a career in uncovering behavioral and biological markers of developmental neurotoxicity.

Ms. Kendricks' research seeks to determine long-term effects of exposure to the environmental contaminant, methylmercury, during early development. Her goal is to better understand the consequences of such exposure and how it relates to symptoms and biomarkers of neurological disorders. The first step in doing this is gaining an understanding of how methylmercury induces long-term behavioral and neural changes. The current research seeks to coalesce these tow aspects of methylmercury toxicity by observing changes in memory and attention and relating these changes in dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with these behaviors and of methylmercury.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Courtney McClure
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Los Angeles

Ms. McClure was delighted to receive this award and to further advance her career in toxicology! It is a great opportunity for her as a result of SOT's generosity. The course is highly relevant to her field of study, molecular toxicology, and she is very excited to further her training. The award will help her pursue her research by advancing her foundational knowledge of toxicology and equip her to better assess and improve her current project. Having this increased understanding of toxicology will help her to be able to understand the field at a completely new level and have a new ability to pursue her research.

Ms. McClure's work focuses on how we are affected by toxicants in our environment. She is particularly interested in the pesticide chlorpyrifos, which is a commonly used pesticide across the US. Her research is investigating what effects chlopyrifos may have on serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter important for mood, sleep, and cognition. She uses the model organism C. elegans, a 1 millimeter long nematode, chosen for its simple nervous system. In humans, chlorpyrifos produces multiple neurodegenerative disorders, and is known to have effects in C. elegans' behavior as well. She is interested in assessing how chlorpyrifos affects the nematode C. elegans in terms of behavior that is innervated by serotonin. This will help her to better understand how environmental toxicants like chlorpyrifos act on our nervous systems.  

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Dalia Arredondo
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: University of St. Thomas

Ms. Arredondo was very honored when she received the news that she had qualified to obtain this award. Being a first generation college student, it has always been her goal to take advantage of the opportunity to expand her learning and receive as much academic experience as she can. As a senior at the University of St. Thomas, attending a national conference has been an interest of hers. This year, thanks to the Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award, she will have the opportunity to attend the 2019 Annual Entomology Society of America conference. Attending this conference will give her the opportunity to present the research on which she and her colleagues are currently working to and meet other professionals in the field of toxicology. Ms. Arredondo is very grateful to the Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development fund for this award and she would also like to especially thank Dr. Rosemarie Rosell for being an exceptional mentor and an amazing professor.

Houston, being one of the top five largest cities in the United States, has a great deal of inhabitants and just as many industrial work facilities. As a result, there are various types of toxic compounds released into the atmosphere that civilians are at risk of inhaling. Toluene is an example of these toxic organic compound detected in the air, and is commonly found in household products, beauty products, and industrial workplaces. This research essentially focuses on the effect of toluene in terms of reproductive functionality and resulting offspring survivability. The effects of toluene are investigated on Drosophila melanogaster, a model species, that share similar human gene homologs, proteins and similar functions in regard to the reproductive system. As D.melanogaster have been exposed to toluene, we determined that as the concentration of toluene exposure increased, fecundity and offspring survivability decreases. To further advance the research in the search for additional results, the focus will be on determining fly offspring developmental outcomes and the underlying mechanisms of decreased fecundity and survival of offspring.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Yanelli Nunez
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, MA
Institution/Affiliation: Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University

Ms. Nunez felt it was great news to find out that she had been selected as one of the Career Development award recipients – she and her advisor were both trilled with the news! Attending this workshop will be an incredible opportunity to broaden her knowledge on the in silico analysis of exposure/response data and the general steps involved in the risk assessment process.

Ms. Nunez's dissertation research uses in vitro and in vivo models to study the potential contributions of low-chronic metal exposure to the pathology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Using in vitro cell models, she generated survival-concentration curves for neuronal and glial cells to identify minimal metal exposure concentrations that elicit toxic effects in each cell type. Additionally, she is currently evaluating the effects of chronic low-level manganese exposure in an in vivo model of ALS. Through her laboratory work she became interested in the field of risk assessment, specifically in analyzing exposure/response data and the process of determining safety margins for environmental compounds. For her postdoctoral training, Ms. Nunez plans to take advantage of the increasing availability of toxicological data and exposure/response computational models to evaluate the environmental contributions to neurodegenerative diseases and identify risk levels of exposure. The Pharmacometric Dose-Response Analysis in Clinical trials using R workshop will equip her with an essential set of tools to further her knowledge of the process involve in risk assessment as well as in managing and analyzing dose/response data.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Jephte Akakpo
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award - Jephte Akakpo is a PhD student at the University of Kansas Medical Center. He attended an advanced imaging mass spectrometry (AIMS) laboratory course at Vanderbilt University through the support of SOT’s Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award. Hands-on workshops allowed him to interact with experienced faculty members and graduate students in the mass spectrometry department as well as leading instrument vendors. The experience allowed him to gain skills in sample preparation, matrix application, and data processing with specialized software. The unique experience in this cutting-edge technology along with the critical thinking and problem-solving skills he is acquiring in his PhD training will allow him to successfully build a career in analytical toxicology.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Giovan Cholico
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Biochemisty and Molecular Biology, BS
Institution/Affiliation: Boise State University

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award recipient, Giovan Cholico, is a student at Boise State University. Last fall, he received the Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award, which is administered by the Committee on Diversity Initiatives. He was beyond ecstatic to receive training to interpret his results from RNA-Seq data at the National Center for Genome Research (NCGR) under the guidance of biostatisticians and bioinformaticians.

His research focuses on understanding the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mediating liver fibrosis, specifically the molecular mechanisms that occur in a fibrotic liver through AhR activation. To accomplish this, he used RNA-sequencing to look at transcriptional changes in livers from mice that had (or lacked) liver fibrosis. 

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Roxana Coreas
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Riverside

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award recipient, Roxana Coreas, is a PhD student at the University of California, Riverside, and due to the generous funding from Society of Toxicology Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award, she attended the American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting and Exposition in Boston, MA. This conference aligned with her current projects and was an excellent opportunity to increase her understanding and to immerse herself in trending developments in the field. It will remain an invaluable experience for her professional growth. During her poster presentation she discussed her results with multiple professors in order to solidify her research direction. Overall, this opportunity allowed her to improve her presentation and communication skills and gain a better sense of nanoscience and its diverse applications. Her goals were to present her research, receive feedback on her results and aims, network with experts, and learn from experienced nanotechnology experts.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Rosemarie  de La Rosa
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award recipient, Rosemarie de la Rosa, is a PhD student at University of California, Berkeley. Attending the 11th Gordon Research Conference on Environmental Endocrine Disruptors in Les Diablerets, Switzerland has contributed to both her scientific and professional growth. She was particularly excited to attend the session on mixture effects because of a collaborative project she currently has with two scientists at Boston University to understand the effect of multiple chemical exposures on glucocorticoid receptor signaling. This award provided the financial resources needed to attend a conference that would enhance her scientific knowledge of environmental endocrine disruption and assist in accomplishing her long-term goal of becoming a research professor of toxicology. The most rewarding aspect was networking with fellow graduate trainees and researchers from all over the world. During her poster presentation she received suggestions on her project and career moving forward. Organized group trips were also a fun opportunity to build relationships with colleagues. Overall, the conference provided a space for networking with scientists at various career stages and encouraged young researchers, like her, to pursue careers in endocrine disruptor-related research.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Kimberly Rivera-Caraballo
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Bachelor's Degree in Progress
Institution/Affiliation: University of Puerto Rico at Humacao

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development recipient, Kimberly Rivera-Caraballo, is a student at University of Puerto Rico at Humacao. Last spring, she received the Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award, which is administered by the Committee on Diversity Initiatives, to attend the Society for Developmental Biology (SDB) 77th Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon, July 20-23, 2018. It was a small annual conference with international participants. She networked with undergraduates who were conducting research at various institutions. She attended many concurrent sessions in which oral presentations were given on topics that included cell polarity, evo-devo, biology of cancer, and human genetic diseases. The animal models used were very diverse, from C. elegans and Drosophila to butterflies and cephalopods. It was surprising for her to see the modern technology used in current research such as live imaging in cells. After finishing her developmental biology class last spring, she felt comfortable understanding signaling pathways research on Wnt/β-catenin, BMP, and Hedgehog. She took advantage of the attendees’ group breakouts into Theme Tables to learn more about work-life balance during graduate studies. She receives advice for selecting a great mentor and lab in which to work.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Sylvia Sanchez
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award recipient, Sylvia Sanchez, is a PhD student at University of California, Berkeley, and attended her first conference focused entirely on her research interest of endocrine disruptors. The Society of Toxicology Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award provided her with the opportunity to attend the 11th Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Environmental Endocrine Disruptors (EEDs) in Les Diablerets, Switzerland, from June 3-8, 2018. This year’s conference marked the 20th anniversary of the first GRC on EEDs and brought together leading experts on endocrine disruptors from around the world. She is deeply appreciative of this award as it allowed her to partake in a notable conference in a picturesque country known for academic scientific inquiry, all while advancing her laboratory pursuits and future career as a research scientist.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Rosa Chan
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California San Francisco

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award - Rosa Chan, a PhD student at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), is a recipient of the inaugural Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award for 2017. The award was used to assist Ms. Chan’s attendance to the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) in Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity. In addition to providing networking and career development opportunities, the GRC has increased Ms. Chan’s knowledge on risk assessment, computational models, and systems biological approaches. Her current research at UCSF investigates the potential of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) as a methodology for evaluating toxicological outcomes of therapeutic agents. The goal of this research is to advance the understanding of toxicities associated with the liver and the skin, the two organs most commonly involved in serious adverse drug reactions through the application of physicochemical properties on in vitro screening assay data, and human clinical data. Specifically, her work has implications in terms of physicochemical drug properties and in vitro assays that should be conducted for the evaluation of Stevens Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (STS/TEN) and drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Ms. Chan’s career goal is to become an expert in bridging the gap between the in vitro toxicology assays and the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics analysis to allow for more rapid translation of therapeutic targets.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Kristin  Noell
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award -  Kristen Noell, a PhD student at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), is a recipient of the inaugural Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award for 2017. The award was used to assist Ms. Noell’s attendance to the 28th Molecular Parasitology Meeting hosted by the University of Chicago Marine Biological Laboratory. At this meeting, Ms. Noell presented her dissertation work on Perkinsus marinus as an ideal aquatic parasitic model, in regard to lipid metabolism. The meeting exposed her to alternative techniques to detect lipid droplets in parasitic cultures, as well as projects that explored the molecular and cellular level of these parasites’ functionality, which could be useful to toxicologists or many interdisciplinary scientists. She said she was able to add increased diversity to the meeting because she was one of the few African American women in attendance, thus presenting a double minority. Ms. Noell is the vice student representative for the SOT National Capital Area Chapter and the graduate student representative for Toxicologists of African Origin (TAO).

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Monica  Rios-Cabanillas
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award - Monica Rios-Cabanillas, a PhD student at Michigan State University, is a recipient of the inaugural Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award for 2017. The award was used to assist Ms. Rios-Cabanillas’ attendance to the 2017 Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) conference. Her current study is on the mechanisms of methylmercury-mediated calcium dysregulation and induced cell death of spinal cord neurons after an acute exposure. Ms. Rios-Cabanillas also assisted with the Committee on Diversity Initiatives’ exhibit booth at SACNAS and shared opportunities in toxicology to undergraduate. In addition to presenting her own research, Ms. Rios-Cabanillas judged posters for undergraduate student attendees. She is a mentor to undergraduate students herself and is dedicated to mentoring and developing underrepresented minority student scientists. SACNAS exposed her to a diverse community in STEM, as well as access to future educational and professional opportunities in her fields of interest in neurotoxicology, toxicity regulation, environmental advisory, and neurotoxicity research.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Ignacio Tripodi
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Colorado at Boulder

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award - Ignacio Tripodi, a PhD student in the BioFrontiers Institute Interdisciplinary Quantitative Biology program at the University of Colorado, Boulder, is a recipient of the inaugural Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award for 2017. The award was used to assist Mr. Tripodi’s attendance to the 10th World Congress in Alternatives to Animal Use in the Life Sciences (WC10). Mr. Tripodi’s motivation to go to graduate school was to learn about research techniques that contribute to moving the 3Rs paradigm forward: to develop approaches to reduce, refine, and replace animal testing. At WC10, he was surprised to learn about the existence of many alternatives to animal-based reagents and the advantages of tools such as xeno-free media. To his delight, he also discovered animal welfare organizations working in concert with scientific advisory boards to promote the implementation of the 3Rs, with an emphasis on replacement whenever possible. Mr. Tripodi’s background is in computer science and he hopes to bridge the gap between biology and data analysis.

Diversity Initiatives Fund

Recipient: Yislain Villalona
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: Bachelor's in progress
Institution/Affiliation: Northern Kentucky University

Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award - Yislain Villalona, an undergraduate at Northern Kentucky University (NKU), is a recipient of the inaugural Diversity Initiatives Endowment Career Development Award for 2017. The award allowed Ms. Villalona to attend and present at her first national scientific conference, the 41st Anniversary Annual Meeting of the Developmental Neurotoxicology Society, held in Conjunction with the 57th Annual Meeting of the Teratology Society. She used the opportunity to network with prominent scientists and attended various workshops for mentoring and professional development and was able to fill an unmet need at her institution’s smaller science program. Ms. Villanola works at Dr. Christine Curran’s toxicology lab at NKU and has been learning the basics of PCR genotyping, histology and immunohistochemistry. A native Spanish speaker, Ms. Villanola has a special interest in toxicology outreach and has previous experience educating immigrant children whose native language were not English. She hopes to apply for graduate programs that can further her path in public health.

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Cody  Smith
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Dr. Smith was elated to learn he'd been awarded the Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award. Receipt of this award will allow him to gain additional training outside of his primary mentor's expertise, which will broaden his scientific toolkit and open novel lines of independent investigation. 

Dr. Smith's postdoctoral research focuses on the role of innate immune cells, namely macrophages, in toxicant-induced lung injury and repair. His long-term career goal is to be an established investigator directing a research program focused on elucidating cellular signaling mechanisms contributing to sex-based differences in pulmonary disease. As part of this training experience, he plans to learn techniques to investigate the role of estrogen receptor signaling in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in toxicant-induced lung injury and repair as a mechanism contributing to sex-based differences in lung disease, an emerging area of research. This training and education experience will allow him to broaden his scientific toolkit, promote his independence, and facilitate his transition to a faculty position.  

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Andres Henriquez
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: ORISE/EPA

Dr. Henriquez was surprised and thankful of this opportunity for collaboration. This award will help him to test how endothelial cell disruption may be a key event in mediating ozone-induced adverse effects.

Dr. Henriquez's research is focused on the exploration of mechanisms by which air pollutants induce, exacerbate and modulate pulmonary and extra-pulmonary responses. Neuroendocrine stress response has been identified as a major mechanism regulating ozone toxicity. His future goals include the bridging from in vivo to in vitro to characterize cell-specific responses to ozone-induced derangements in circulating stress hormones. The innovation of this proposal is the use of in vivo and in vitro approaches to address important mechanistic questions involved in health effects of air pollutants. Specifically, he plans to examine how endothelial cells are affected by the previously characterized ozone-induced changes on serum levels of adrenal-derived stress hormones.

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Jared Radbel
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Dr. Radbel was honored and excited to receive the Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award. Through this award, he will be able to learn how to develop animal models of acute lung injury following ozone exposure.

His research focuses on the effects of air pollutants in the development of life-threatening lung diseases. For this award, he plans to examine the inflammatory mechanisms by which ozone exposure predisposes mice to infection-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. His future goal is to become a translational scientist who develops treatments for serious lung diseases associated with air pollution exposure.

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Meghan Rebuli
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Rebuli's reaction upon receiving the award was excitement about the ability to share the newly developed, novel nasal mucosal sampling technique with others in the field of respiratory toxicology. It is her hope that the ability to create their instructional video and share the technique and its uses will facilitate new translational research and collaborations. New research and collaborations using the technique will help to better characterize airway immune profiles (cytokine, chemokine, protease, proteome, etc.) in a variety of populations and determine adverse effects of toxicant exposures. She also hopes to expand the use of the technique into other applications.

Her research in the Jaspers lab focuses on investigating the effects of air pollutants and other inhaled toxicants (wood smoke, cigarettes, and e-cigarettes) on respiratory innate immune host defense responses. She is particularly interested in understanding the role of sex in varying responses to these toxicants. Her plan is to expand upon her current research and combine it with her graduate work in neuroendocrine toxicology to support a future academic research career. To more effectively answer their research questions, she helped develop a new nasal mucosal sampling technique. This method was specifically designed to collect concentrated and replicable samples from the nasal mucosa and improve on the current gold standard, nasal lavage. This method, because of its quick and non-invasive nature, is easily adaptable to epidemiological studies as a biomarker collection technique, field studies because of its stable capture of proteins, and use in the clinic in a variety of populations. Her proposal to share the technique via instructional video and webinar is why she won this award.

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew McGraw
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Colorado School of Medicine
Dr. McGraw was honored to receive the Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Award. This award will allow him to learn the entire process of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming from reprogramming methodologies, iPSC identification, isolation and characterization, and current approaches to their directed differentiation into endodermal and lung lineages. He will use the information learned at Dr. Kotton's lab in Boston to use cell-based therapy for repair of a damaged epithelium after sulfur mustard inhalation injuries and prevention of bronchiolitis obliterans. His research is on inhalation injury after sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a common warfare agent that causes both acute and chronic morbidity and mortality. One common long-term morbidity is bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). BO is defined as a progressive narrowing of the airway from fibroproliferation. One of the central pathways behind the development of BO is injury to the airway epithelium and aberrant repair. His research focuses on the contribution of the airway epithelium after inhalation injury. Additionally, he is interested in how an impaired epithelium after injury contributes to the development of BO. Recently, his lab has shown a lack of proliferation and differentiation of the airway epithelium weeks after exposure to sulfur mustard with the concurrent development of BO. The Donald Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award will allow him to travel to Boston to study induced pluripotent stem cell programming. He hopes to use this education to identify, isolate, and re-program airway epithelium after sulfur mustard exposure to prevent the development of BO.

Donald E. Gardner Inhalation Toxicology Education Award Fund

Recipient: Katherine Zychowski
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of New Mexico
Dr. Zychowski studies how air pollution drives vascular disease. Her hope is to stay in an academic or government research setting. Additionally, she is very interested in toxicological implications pertaining to public health. Under the esteemed mentorship of Drs. Matt Campen(University of New Mexico) and Jim Wagner (Michigan State University) her plan is to use this award to travel to Michigan State University this summer to train on the state-of-the-art mobile air pollution laboratory, AirCARE 2.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Elana Elkin
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD, MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Michigan

Dr. Elkin was very surprised and humbled to receive the Carney Trainee Award from the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section. It will help her to attend SOT scientific sessions, present her work, and most importantly, network with other toxicologists in her field.

Dr. Elkin's research evaluates the effects of environmental contaminants on the placenta in order to elucidate mechanism by which pollutants may contribute to adverse birth outcomes.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Vasiliki Mourikes
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Veterinary Medicine

Ms. Mourikes was incredibly surprised when she found out she was selected for the Edward W. Carney Trainee Award. She feels very grateful to her adviser and her colleagues for encouraging her to apply. Their support has been pivotal in making the transition between a veterinary curriculum and a research environment quite enjoyable. The award will make a significant contribution to her travel expenses for the 59th annual SOT meeting in Anaheim. Beyond sharing her own research, attending the conference will allow Ms. Mourikes to network with other successful toxicologists exchanging information about new developments in toxicology, including techniques and approaches that she can apply to her future research.

At the time of the award, Ms. Mourikes was a third year DVM-PhD student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The broad goal of her research is to characterize toxic endpoints of agricultural chemicals and understand their mechanism of toxicity to the ovary. Most agricultural chemicals currently in use pose a massive toxic trade off to human, animal, and environmental health. By further researching detoxification mechanisms, we can develop pesticides that are both efficient and non-threatening. Ultimately, she sees herself in either of two capacities; as a professor in academia or working for a government agency like the NIEHS. With training in both clinical medicine and research, she will be positioned to provide unique perspective and a comparative approach to the ever-growing field of translational veterinary medicine. In addition to doing her own research in veterinary and environmental toxicology, Ms. Mourikes is motivated to bring the field to the forefront of both human and animal healthcare systems. She hopes to act as a positive mentor to other students and wants to make herself accessible to people that are not in the science or medical fields. Regardless of the setting, her goal is to study the direct impacts of agricultural chemicals on animal health and use her work as a platform to raise awareness of the connectedness of human, animal, and environmental health. The specific research for which Ms. Mourikes won this award addresses the effects that imidacloprid, the most popular neonicotinoid insecticide, has on ovarian antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Neonicotinoids are synthetic nicotine derivatives that act as systemic neurotoxicants. They can be found across all agricultural systems, as well as in flea and tick preventatives that we apply to our pets. Their ubiquitous and rapidly increasing use results in chronic exposure of non-target species including humans and our pets, livestock, fish, birds, and pollinators. Hypotheses: Environmentally relevant levels of imidacloprid interfere with ovarian antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Methods: Antral follicle culture is an extremely valuable tool in environmental and reproductive toxicology. The antral follicle contains three different cell types that intricately communicate with each other to make critical contributions to reproductive and systemic physiologic health. The oocyte, granulsa cells, and theca cells make critical contributions to reproduction as well as systemic physiological health. The sex steroid hormones released from granulosa and theca cells work in feedback loops with gonadotropins and hypothalamic hormones in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Unlike single cell culture systems, antral follicle culture allows one to explore the individual functions as well as the interactions of these three cell types much like they would function in the whole animal. The four concentrations of imidacloprid were carefully selected to be representative of humans and animals who are exposed as consumers of contaminated food and water, and imidacloprid containing pharmaceuticals (0.2 and 2 μg/ml), as well as humans who are occupationally exposed and livestock who have higher exposure because of their proximity to the sites of imidacloprid application (20 μg/ml). The value in assessing the toxic endpoints associated with various concentrations is that it allows us to better understand the patterns of dose response which are often quite convoluted for endocrine disrupting chemicals. The antral follicle growth pattern described in the abstract above (48hrs in culture) as well as the growth patterns associated with 72hr and 96hr cultures, support the hypothesis that endocrine disruption by imidacloprid exhibits a nonmonotonic dose-response where exposure to the lowest concentration(0.2 μg/ml) is most inhibitory on follicle growth, and exposure to the highest concentration(200 μg/ml) is least inhibitory on follicle growth compared to control. Changes in expression of cell cycle regulators and apoptotic factors explain some of the observed patterns, but not all. For example, the significant down regulation of the proliferation factor Ki67 and the cell cycle stimulator Ccna2 in the follicles treated with 0.2 μg/ml imidacloprid explain why those follicles experience the greatest growth arrest. The expression of these factors remained unchanged in the follicles treated with 200 μg/ml imidacloprid, suggesting that other factors mediate the effects that imidacloprid has on antral follicle health. Outcomes: As described above, the production of sex steroid hormones by the antral follicle has both local reproductive effects as well as systemic effects in the whole animal. By assessing the steroidogenic machinery that exists within each of these cells, she can identify if imidacloprid interferes with steroidogenesis, and if so, how it does so specifically. Imidacloprid exposure caused significant changes in expression of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in steroidogenesis by both the granulosa and theca cells. These changes in expression along with the quantification of hormones released into the culture media indicate that imidacloprid can interfere with the functional ovary. The changes in expression observed in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and both estrogen receptors provide valuable insight into the mechanisms through which imidacloprid can have negative reproductive and systemic health outcomes. Together, the data collected from this multi-cell culture system have given Ms. Mourikes both direction and important insight for designing an in vivo protocol to assess the impact of imidacloprid in the mouse- an invaluable model for the mammalian species. As she continues to characterize the morphological and functional manifestations of imidacloprid toxicity to the ovary, she is looking forward to adding bioactive metabolites to her analysis, as well as other relevant neonicotinoids. She is excited at the prospect of exploring mechanisms of neonicotinoid toxicity, as well as detoxification mechanisms in the ovary.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Catheryne Chiang
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Ms. Chiang felt incredulous and elated This award will help pursue her research by relieving the financial burden incurred by travel to SOT. Additionally, this award will strengthen her CV and make her a stronger candidate in future applications for awards and postdocoral positions.

Ms. Chiang's research focuses on how specific plasticizers affect female fertility, especially how acute exposure affects a female over her life time, using a mouse model. her future goals are to work with safety/regulation/public health as it concerns toxicology. She is hoping to acquire a postdoctoral position in a governmental agency focused on or around those areas. The specific research she conducted to win this award involved acutely exposing mice to DEHP and a DEHP replacement chemical, DiNP. She analyzed fertility indices and hormone levels in these mice immediately, 3 months, and 6 months post dosing. Her research shows that acute exposure to both of these chemicals has long lasting effects on female fertility and affects sex steroid hormone levels within these mice.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Subham Dasgupta
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Riverside

Dr. Dasgupta was absolutely delighted on receiving this award, since he believes that it provides a validation for the work that he has been doing for the last 2 years within the area of developmental toxicology. For him, this recognition by his peers is definitely a great achievement, and will motivate him more in continuing to work within this field. The monetary amount also allowed him to defray the cost of traveling and lodging for the conference and lessened the financial burden on his mentor so that more funds can be used to pursue research in the lab.

Dr. Dasgupta is studying the toxic effects of early the flame retardant TDCIPP on early development of embryos. TDCIPP is known to impact the movement of cells within the embryo, leading to an arrest of a cell-migration process called "epiboly". Within this research he has shown that the impacts of TDCIPP on this process may be driven by epigenetic changes within the embryo that can further disrupt biological pathways. In addition, TDCIPP also alters specific lipid metabolites within the embryos, which may also contribute to the epiboly arrest. Overall, this research shows that the flame retardant can disrupt development during early stages of the embryo, which can lead to embryo mortality, teratogenesis and implantation failure.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Isabelle Lee
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Ms. Lee was honored and grateful to be the recipient of the Edward W. Carney Trainee Endowment Award. This award supported her travel to the 58th Annual Society of Toxicology Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland in March, 2019 where she presented her research elucidating the role of environmental toxicants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in driving endometrial cancer. She significantly benefitted from this support during this final phase of her graduate school tenure, as traveling to national and international scientific meetings is an integral part of her training and development as a scientist. At the SOT Meeting she not only had the opportunity to strengthen her knowledge in reproductive toxicology by listening to fellow scientists, but also by receiving critical feedback that would bolster her own work. She also had the chance to meet prospective employers and attend professional development workshops at a critical point in her career trajectory. She thanks the committee once again for granting her with this award!

The increase in endocrine-related cancers, including endometrial malignancies, may be related to increased exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. Endometrial cancer is a disease of unopposed estrogens, and the source of these estrogens could endogenous or exogenous. Ms. Lee's research focuses on determining whether environmental toxicants, specifically polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their metabolites, act as exogenous estrogens in the human endometrium. In this project, she demonstrated that some PAH metabolites with structural resemblance to estrogens act as ligands for the estrogen receptor. These compounds also promote the expression of cell cycle genes, and the proliferation of endometrial cells. She additionally found endometrial cells to metabolize the prototypic PAH, benzo[a]pyrene, into estrogenic metabolites. This work reveals how environmental toxicants may activate nuclear receptors to promote endometrial hormone dependent malignancies, such as endometrial cancer. Her future goal is to investigate whether the more potent effects of PAH are driven by other forms of estrogen receptors such as GPR30; and she will be knocking down estrogen receptors alpha and beta in endometrial cells to determine whether this can block the effects of PAH metabolites on cell growth. The end goal will be to elucidate the mechanism of action of PAH in driving endometrial cell proliferation.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Danielle Drake
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BSc
Institution/Affiliation:

Ms. Drake was surprised and excited to receive this award! She is glad that others recognize the potential impact a breast cancer 1 protein deficiency may have during development, and the importance of identifying possible genetic or environmental risk factors for neurodevelopmental deficits in children. This award will provide an opportunity to explain her research to more people and further exposure for these findings.

To date they have identified a mechanism involving forms of reactive oxygen that can damage DNA, contributing to an increased risk of neurodevelopmental deficits in individuals that are deficient in DNA repair. They have characterized their model using a threshold dose of alcohol (ethanol), which can generate more of the reactive oxygen, resulting in greater levels of DNA damage and learning and memory deficits only in the genetically predisposed progeny deficient in DNA repair. Her interest in developmental toxicology is why she would like to pursue a career in contract research when she has completed her PhD, to help protect children from the toxic effects of potential pharmaceutical products.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Shilpa Mokshagundam
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, BA
Institution/Affiliation: Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Ms. Mokshagundam and her mentor were both surprised and thrilled upon receiving the news that their work had been selected to receive this award! They dedicated considerable effort in developing this disease model, and were pleased that the reviewers recognized the importance of this research. Receiving the Edward Carney Award will not only support her travel to the Teratology Society Conference this coming June, but has also validated their endeavors. They are looking forward to sharing and discussing this work at the meeting!

Their laboratory, under the mentorship of Dr. Kaylon Bruner-Tran, has developed a mouse model of in utero exposure to environmental toxicants. They look at the implications of in utero toxicant exposure on the function of reproductive and non-reproductive tissue across generations. In their current study, they are looking at the role of parental toxicant exposure on offspring susceptibility to a life-threatening disease, necrotizing enterocolitis. They found that after supplementing breastmilk with an inflammatory substance, dextran sodium sulfate, the offspring of toxicant-exposed mice have increased susceptibility to this disease when compared to offspring of parents without toxicant exposure. Understanding the mechanisms behind development of this severe disease can provide a window for both more accurate diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. As a third-year medical student planning to pursue a career in Obstetrics and Gynecology, this research has considerable implications on her future practice. Through this research, she has learned the importance of preconception nutritional counseling. In addition, this work has demonstrated the significant role of the father in pregnancy health and outcomes. As an Ob/Gyn, she hopes to support families prior to and during pregnancy, in order to ensure that optimal outcomes for both the mother and the baby.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Daniel Spade
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Brown University

Dr. Spade is honored and grateful to receive the Edward W. Carney Trainee Award. The award will support hyis travel to the 2018 SOT Annual Meeting to present his research done over the last several years as a postdoc. He is honored to be recognized for his work and also pleased to receive an award with an emphasis on education and training, as he is currently pursuing a career in academia.

He is interested in mechanisms of male reproductive toxicity, specifically the mechanisms by which phthalates, a class of chemicals used as plasticizers, disrupt fetal testis development. In this project, he investigated the effects of phthalates and retinoic acid on the development of fetal rat testes in culture. He found that phthalates and retinoic acid interact to disrupt the sex determination signaling processes required for maintenance of testicular cell fate and the structure of seminiferous cords in the fetal testis.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: John Szilagyi
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS Chemistry
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Mr. Szilagyi feels this award is a great honor, and is proud to receive it. This generous gift will help to supplement his efforts in completing this project and, ultimately, his doctoral thesis.

His work seeks to understand what environmental and genetic factors influence how toxicants cross the placenta during pregnancy.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Edith Marie McKenzie
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia
Ms. McKenzie was honored and excited to receive the Edward W Carney Trainee Award. It provides an opportunity to attend and share at both the Society of Toxicology and Teratology Society 2017 Annual Meetings. The state of the art research presentations are an unparalleled learning experience. In addition, the prospect of networking with leading researchers and students, while receiving specific, on point feedback about her project is a fantastic opportunity. She looks forward to increasing her knowledge and building on developmental/reproductive toxicology concepts. After a career of working with children with birth defects, her greatest accomplishment will be contributing to the science of prevention. The ultimate goal of her research is to create an alternative cell based model which predicts toxicity to the developing human brain. She is utilizing a systems approach to evaluate nerve cell responses to pesticides. The study objectives were 1) to compare the metabolomic profile of three pesticide groups; aldicarb (a carbamate), chlorpyrifos (an organophosphate) and lindane (an organochloride) in neural progenitor (hN2) cells, and 2) to determine whether the biological impact in hN2 cells would be affected by first exposing pesticides to C3A cells, an immortal liver cell line derived from hepG2 cells, and subsequently exposing the pre-conditioned media to hN2 cells. C3A cells were added to our model to mimic in vivo liver biotransformation of chemical exposures. To biotransform the pesticides, C3A cells were grown to confluency and treated with the same concentrations of pesticide in hN2 media for two hours. This pre-conditioned media was removed and added to hN2 cells. Afterwards, the media was analyzed by GC/MS. This study confirmed hN2 cells are responsive to pesticide exposure at doses less than 30uM, and pre-conditioning media results in biotransformation (i.e. chlorpyrifos forms chlorpyrifos-oxon). For parent pesticides, fluxes in the metabolomic profile increased with increasing doses and various metabolomic pathways were affected following exposure to biotransformed products. Independent of which pesticide was used in hN2 cells, some overlap occurred in metabolomic profiles; within each pesticide different profiles were observed for each dose. The introduction of the C3A pre-conditioned media affected the quantity of metabolites and biochemical pathways. In conclusion, addition of a metabolic component changed the metabolites affected and may be a better model for assessing risk.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Karilyn Sant
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD, MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts
Dr. Sant is incredibly grateful for this award, and hopes to serve the developmental toxicology community throughout her career according to Dr. Carney's lead. This award will not only allow her to share her current work with the toxicology community, but will also give her opportunities to establish lasting professional relationships with the many excellent developmental toxicologists in RDTSS. Her research investigates the consequences of embryonic exposures to endocrine disruptors, namely those which predispose to metabolic dysfunction later in the lifecourse. She and her colleagues are working to understand how these exposures influence embryonic nutrition, pancreas development, and glucoregulatory function. This project specifically probes the role of the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in the response to perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), a persistent compound previously used as a surfactant in products such as Teflon and Scotchgard.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Kristin Bircsak
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Ms. Bircsak's PhD research focuses on characterizing the regulation of a feto-protective protein and placental xenobiotic transporter, the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2). The data presented in her 2016 SOT abstract describes transcription factor expression and genetic variants as contributors to the up to 6-fold variation in the BCRP mRNA expression between 109 ethnically-diverse placentas. Importantly, an exonic SNP was associated with reduced BCRP protein expression, but not mRNA of individuals that expressed one or two of the variant alleles. By understanding the factors that govern placental BCRP function, the hope is to identify at risk populations that require individualized prescribing of drugs during pregnancy. Submerging herself in the research and literature of her doctoral thesis project served as inspiration to seek a career in the field of reproductive and developmental toxicology. Ultimately, Ms. Bircsak aspires for a research career in which she will help expand the limited safety data available for drugs used in pregnancy, thereby ensuring the safety of future generations.

Edward W. Carney Trainee Award Fund

Recipient: Deirdre Tucker
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: UNC Chapel Hill
Overall, Ms. Tucker's research focuses on the effects of early life exposures to chemicals that have the potential to alter the developing mammary gland in a rodent model system. Her chemicals of interest include Bisphenol A and other analogues including BPAF and BPS. The goal is to determine if these chemicals may play a role in changing key morphological and cellular processes that are responsible for normal development. In turn she is also trying to determine if these chemicals have long term consequences that may increase the likelihood of developing later life diseases, including mammary carcinogenesis. The work for this award determined that following an in utero exposure to BPA, BPAF and BPS female CD-1 offspring developed multiple mammary phenotypes that included inflammation, hyperplasia, and adenocarcinoma that were present as early as 8-11 months of age. The severity of these phenotypes increased with age (14 mos.), especially in BPAF 5 mg/kg and BPS 0.5 mg/kg treated animals. Interestingly, estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor mRNA expression were unchanged which may point to other mechanisms of action for these chemicals.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alkeiver Cannon
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina - School of Medicine

Upon receiving notification that she had been awarded this award, Ms. Cannon was very surprised and extremely grateful. She feels this award will highlight her productivity and assist in securing additional funding to continue pursuing her research.

Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic, inflammatory disease that is a growing health concern in the United States. Currently, treatment is accomplished by administration of broad immunosuppressive drugs which often lead to serious side effects, thus emphasizing the need for a more specific approach. Ms. Cannon's studies focus on determining the effects of activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the amelioration of this disease. Though genetic factors have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, they have found that elements outside of the genes known as the epigenome, specifically microRNAs such as miR-374, play a role in modulating this disease and may serve as preventive or therapeutic targets. In the future, her goals include broadening her knowledge of the epigenome, further exploring the effects of activating AhR by plant products.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Carratt
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

In many ways, the choice to use postdoctoral time to gain expertise in biomedical research has required Dr. Carratt to take a step away from toxicology. However, she feels that a part of her identity is deeply rooted in toxicology, which is why she has continued to be involved through SOT committees and the Postdoctoral Assembly. It makes her proud to receive an award from the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund in recognition of her work at the intersection of toxicology and cancer biology. It gives her hope that she will be able to find her niche in the next stage of her career.

Dr. Carratt believes the key to creating more efficacious and tolerable therapies for patients is finding more specific targets, and her postdoctoral research aims to turn markers of poor prognosis into opportunities for targeted therapy. Her research largely centers on SETBP1 mutations, which are associated with poor prognosis and relapse in a number of leukemias. She is actively investigating how SETBP1 drives gene expression changes, histone modification, cell cycle dysfunction, and alters of the hematopoietic differentiation hierarchy. Dr. Carratt's current, short-term goal is to gain expertise in molecular biology and oncology. She is particularly interested in mechanistic investigations of oncogene cooperation, which she believes is the key to creating more efficacious and tolerable therapies for patients with aggressive, heterogeneous disease. Her long-term goal is to be a leader at the intersection of cancer biology, pharmacology, and toxicology.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Siennah Miller
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Ms. Miller was very excited to learn that she received the Emil Pfitzer Drug Discovery Toxicology Endowment Fund student award. The award will help her pursue her research by providing funding for publication fees, membership fees for professional societies like SOT, and traveling to scientific meetings where she can share her exciting research with others. 

Ms. Miller's graduate research focuses on drug transport across the blood-testis barrier (BTB). The male genital tract is a sanctuary site for diseases such as viral infections and cancer. When drugs are able to circumvent this barrier, diseases can be treated more effectively without the need for orchiectomy or radiation therapy for cancer or the risk of sexual transmission of viruses. Drug transporters are required for many drugs and toxicants to enter the testis. Drugs that are substrates transporters can effectively cross this barrier to provide therapeutic benefit. Her research focuses specifically on the equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). These transporters provide endogenous nucleosides essential for nucleic acid synthesis. Drugs that have analogous structures to endogenous nucleosides, such as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), are thought to be substrates for the ENTs. Identifying substrates and further developing our understanding of the substrate selectivity of the ENTs could provide insight on the most effective treatment options for patients with cancer or viral infections. 

To study these transporters, Ms. Miller developed CRISPR/Cas9 functional knockouts of ENT1 and ENT2. These cell lines allow her to examine the function of each ENT individually. She has characterized uridine transport in these cells and the effects of NRTIs and various nucleoside and heterocyclic analogs on uridine transport.  This work showed the interactions of several clinically relevant compounds with ENT1 and ENT2 including abacavir. Ms. Miller plans on determining whether or not these compounds are inhibitors and/or substrates of ENT1 and ENT2 and hopes to develop a pharmacophore that will help predict the ability of currently available drugs to cross the BTB and guide future drug development. After she earns her PhD, she wants to work in the pharmaceutical industry in a drug metabolism and disposition group. 

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Leah Norona
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Genentech, Inc.

Dr. Norona was greatly honored to receive this award. She relayed it is gratifying to know that their hard work and efforts have been noticed and appreciated even during these challenging times. This award will help her pursue her research by increasing visibility among colleagues and facilitate important scientific discussions and collaborations.

Dr. Norona has always been intrigued by the cellular mechanisms underlying adverse health effects resulting from compound exposure. Her future goal is to become a more well-rounded toxicologist and a leader in the strategic implementation of new de-risking strategies to help get novel, safer drugs to patients. The main goal of her research is to make scientific contributions to the optimization/development of novel in vitro models to capture and understand complex mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In particular, the role that that drug-induced antagonism of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays in a sub-type of DILI that results in an increase in intracellular bile acids that can lead to hepatocellular injury. FXR is the master regulator of bile acid homeostasis and there is a prevailing assumption in the DILI field that FXR antagonism is an important mechanism of DILI. However, there has not been an exhaustive look at both the prevalence of this phenomenon broadly, nor a true assessment of the predictivity of FXR antagonism to identify clinically relevant hepatotoxicants. The work described in this poster abstract addresses these areas by employing two complementary experimental approaches to assess FXR antagonism for a large and balanced test set of clinically relevant hepatotoxicants and drugs not associated with DILI. After careful consideration for cytotoxicity to reduce potential for false-positive signals, which previous reports have failed to do, the findings support relatively low overall prevalence of FXR antagonism across the test set and minimal to moderate predictive value to identify known hepatotoxicants retrospectively. Taken together, this work represents an important addition to the DILI field and outlines novel approaches that can be employed in drug discovery to address this phenotype for mechanistic studies, risk assessment or issue mitigation.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sharavan  Ramachandran
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Dr. Ramachandran was really excited to hear that he was selected as a recipient for the prestigious Emil Pfizer Drug Discovery Toxicology Student Endowment Award. It is a great honor and acknowledgement of his research findings. This award will invigorate his career prospects by providing a global platform to present his research.  

Dr. Ramachandran's doctoral thesis project is focused on re-purposing Pimavanserin for brain tumors and pancreatic cancer. This approach will pave way for novel treatment options for cancer patients. His short term goal is to decipher the mechanism of action behind the anticancer effects of PVT. His long term goal is to conduct clinical studies on pimavanserin and develop pimavanserin as a novel therapeutic agent for cancer. 

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Dr. Sarkar was thrilled to receive the award. He received the award as a graduate student and is now in his first year of postdoc. Receiving this award means a lot to him and it will help him pursue his career in translational science. 

Dr. Sarkar's research revolves around the role of environmental factors in neurodegeneration and how they interact with genetic factors. His goal is to have an independent lab focusing on gene-environment interaction in Parkinson's disease. Currently, he is working on developing a multiplex model which can be used to study the interactions in a high-throughput manner using alternative models like Drosophila.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Paige Glumac
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Minnesota

Ms. Glumac was honored to be selected for this award. Since she came to the conference independently, this award helped to defray the costs of her attendance and allowed her to obtain valuable feedback about her research prior to publication.

Ms. Glumac's research focuses on developing novel antibodies which are selective for prostate cancer. The research for which she won this award was based solely on her identification of CD133 as a targetable biomarker in a particular subset of prostate cancer patients and the development of a novel antibody which can target CD133. In this research, she also used this antibody as an imaging agent to identify CD133-positive prostate cancer tumors using mouse models. Due to the specificity of her novel antibody, she hopes to use it as a therapeutic agent moving forward in the form of an antibody-drug conjugate or radioimmunotherapy.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Monica Langley
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Mayo Clinic

Dr. Langley was very excited and honored to be selected as the first place winner for this award. Being recognized for successfully presenting drug discovery research will help build her credibility as a researcher and highlight additional skill sets on her CV to potential future employers.

Dr. Langley's work aims to better understand the underlying mechanisms of chronic high fat diet induced oligodendrocyte loss in animal models and connect this to epidemiological studies which show metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS) development and disease progression. In cell culture and ex vivo models, she has shown efficacy of a newly identified target for demyelination and high fat co-exposure, and are planning new studies in translational models of MS to better characterize the efficacy and safety of this target.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Lauren Lewis
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Ms. Lewis was very excited to receive the 2nd place poster presentation award. This award helped her with her travel expenses for the SOT 58th Annual Meeting.

Ms. Lewis's research investigates epigenetic effects and their role in chemical-induced carcinogenesis. Her poster highlighted the tissue-specific epigenetic effects in a population-based mouse model. She hopes to work in the pharmaceutical industry as a toxicologist.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Lutz Mueller
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: F. Hoffmann-La Roche

Dr. Mueller was pleasantly surprised to receive this award.

Dr. Mueller received his award for the discovery, selection and safety testing of a SMN2 small molecule RNA splice modifier. RNA splice modification is a new category of small molecule targets, which present large hurdles for specificity and safety. This will spur new research into this direction. RNA splice modification is a new field in safety and specificity testing and disease interference for small molecules. The design of safe such small molecules will advance knowledge in toxicology.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Sarkar won this award as a graduate student, but was not expecting to win this prestigious award as a first year postdoc. He was pleasantly surprised. Being acknowledged by experts in the field will help him in his career and in his ultimate goal of becoming an independent PI.

Dr. Sarkar's goal is to identify drug targets for Parkinson's disease patients using Drosophila as a high-throughput screening model. Here he showed that he can use this model to identify targets in PD subsets. If we can better understand the complex nature of gene-environment crosstalk we can go towards personalized medicine in neurodegnerative diseases instead of generic approach.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Melanie Abongwa
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Dr. Abongwa would like to thank the DDTSS for selecting her as one of the recipients of the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoctoral Award this year. She is greatly honored by this award but will also like to thank all the people she worked with and wants them to see this award as theirs also. This award has helped to boost her self-confidence as well as the relevance of her research. More importantly, this award will push her further towards working to become a successful postdoc.

Research focus: Functional expression and pharmacological characterization of parasitic nematode ion channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes as potential targets for anthelmintic drugs. Future goals: Successful toxicology career in academia or industry with the ultimate goal of investigating the molecular nature of drug interactions with their targets and assessing the efficacy and safety of new drugs. Details on the specific research for which she won this award: Zolvix® is a recently introduced anthelmintic drench containing monepantel as the active ingredient. Monepantel is a positive allosteric modulator of DEG-3/DES-2 type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in several nematode species. The drug has been reported to produce hypercontraction of Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus somatic muscle. She and her team investigated the effects of monepantel on nAChRs from Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology, they studied the effects of monepantel on a nicotine preferring homomeric nAChR subtype from A. suum comprising of ACR-16; a pyrantel/tribendimidine preferring heteromeric subtype from O. dentatum comprising UNC-29, UNC-38 and UNC-63 subunits; and a levamisole preferring subtype (O. dentatum) comprising UNC-29, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-8 subunits. For each subtype tested, monepantel applied in isolation produced no measurable currents thereby ruling out an agonist action. When monepantel was continuously applied, it reduced the amplitude of acetylcholine induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner. In all three subtypes, monepantel acted as a non-competitive antagonist on the expressed receptors. ACR-16 from A. suum was particularly sensitive to monepantel inhibition (IC50 values: 1.6?±?3.1?nM and 0.2?±?2.3?μM). She and her team also investigated the effects of monepantel on muscle flaps isolated from adult A. suum. The drug did not significantly increase baseline tension when applied on its own. As with acetylcholine induced currents in the heterologously expressed receptors, contractions induced by acetylcholine were antagonized by monepantel. Further investigation revealed that the inhibition was a mixture of competitive and non-competitive antagonism. Their findings suggest that monepantel is active on multiple nAChR subtypes.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Takumi Kagawa
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Nagoya university

Mr. Kagawa is honored to be selected as one of the best candidates in Drug Discovery Toxicology Specialty Section Student Poster Competition. This will be one of his best moments in his life as a researcher. He would like to thank everyone who provided him with this great opportunity, and greatly appreciates the support of his coworkers in the laboratory. He is going to use the grant for participation in academic conferences to broaden his horizon. Moreover, this award will be his motivation to keep on research.

The goal of his research is to identify novel biomarkers that can detect different types of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) earlier than traditional biomarkers, such as ALT and AST. In the present study, he and his team focused on microRNA (miRNA) as a potential biomarker for drug-induced liver injury. MiRNA is a class of small non-coding RNA that plays important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. MiRNA is released from injured cells and can stably exist in the blood, so it has received increasing attention as a non-invasive biomarker for organ injuries, including DILI. In this study, they established different types of DILI model in rats (hepatocellular injury, cholestasis, and steatosis models, and two drugs were used to establish each model), and identified time-dependent changes in the plasma miRNA profile with next-generation sequencer. Through comparing the miRNA profiles between different types of the DILI model, they identified specific miRNAs that characterized each type of DILI, and RT-PCR study revealed that several miRNAs were up-regulated earlier than traditional biomarkers. The present results suggested the utility of specific miRNAs for the prediction of DILI in type-specific manners. Their next step is to further validate the specific miRNA biomarker candidates by using multiple DILI models other than used in this study, and inter-species differences should also be studied.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Xi Li
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Dr. Li was very excited to receive this award. It is a great encouragement for his research and scientific career. He is very thankful to the Drug Discovery Toxicology Specialty Section.

He and his team have developed a new class of small molecules, namely diindolylmethane analogs, for treating solid tumors. These analogs are specific ligands that target nuclear receptor 4A members including NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3, resulting in ligand-induced anticancer effects in our in vitro models. They also investigated the potency of these NR4A-active small molecules in xenograft mouse models and they exhibited excellent antitumor activity with no observable toxicity to the mice. Currently, they are developing a "second generation" of bis-indole compounds using the structure-activity relationship that they observed in previous studies and they expect these new analogs will have increased potency. In addition, recent studies show that NR4A nuclear receptors play an important role in other diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson's Disease. Therefore, they plan to expand our research and use our NR4A ligands in other disease models. They hope that their mechanism-based studies on bis-indole analogs will become options for treating NR4A-dependent solid tumors and other diseases.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Maria Beatriz Monteiro
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Dr. Monteiro is truly honored to receive the Drug Discovery Specialty Section's Emil A Pfitzer Endowment Award. This was the first time she was working on drug discovery and feels it has been a wonderful opportunity to do something very exciting and so meaningful for the progress of kidney disease research. This award encouraged her to continue her work on kidney disease, trying to contribute for a better outcome for the patients.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for AKI and the kidney's mechanisms of repair are not completely understood. Her research project took an approach commonly used in drug discovery with the main goal to identify new compounds that could promote kidney cell proliferation after acute damage. As a result she and her team identified ID-8 as a novel compound that stimulates kidney cells proliferation after different types of acute damage. They demonstrated the superior ability of ID-8 to promote proliferation of human kidney cells compared to other compounds from the same family of drugs in different in vitro models. As a future goal they aim to perform pre-clinical studies that may provide more evidence for the use of ID-8 as a new potential therapy for AKI.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kyle Saitta
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MS, BS
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Mr. Saitta was absolutely surprised when his name was called for 3rd place of the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Toxicology Graduate Student Poster Competition Award . However, he is honored to receive this award and is glad to see that others appreciate the research he is conducting, especially in the field of drug discovery. It is his lab's hope that the research he presented will contribute to the understanding of how to enhance oligodendrocyte regeneration and provide a critical first step towards identifying one potential therapeutic strategy for treating demyelinating diseases. It is also his hope that just by presenting his work to others during the poster competition that other scientists across academia, government, and industry become aware of his work. Further he believes that this could lead to critical discussions to improve his research as well as the research of others.

Demyelinating diseases or demyelination in response to toxic agents is debilitating and can greatly impair the quality of life of affected patients. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in repair of the lesion sites will aid in developing new treatments that target cells involved in the disease process. His research aims to define the effects of a small molecule, metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, in a cuprizone toxicity model of demyelination in mice. He will study the mechanisms involved in demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis and identify potential pharmacological targets to treat affected patients. His future goal is to become an expert in neuropharmacology and neurotoxicology as an independent research scientist.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Mr. Sarkar was not expecting to receive the award and hence missed the reception. But it was a pleasant surprise and will help him with his professional goals.

His current focus of work is to elucidate the role of microglial ion channels in neuroinflammation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models. Recently, he found that one particular channel is highly upregulated in PD animal models as well as postmortem PD brains. He has further showed that in animal models of PD and in primary culture blocking this channel has an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect. He has utilized both genetic knockdown and PAP-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Kv1.3 in clinical trial, to show the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Xi Li
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Dr. Li felt it was a great pleasure to participate in the Drug Discovery Toxicology Specialty Section's poster competition and receiving the award is a great encouragement to pursue his research and career in drug discovery. His work is focused on cancer biology, specially antitumor drugs. He and colleagues have synthesized and identified several diindolylmethane analogs including the hydroxyphenyl-bisindole isomers that target NR4A nuclear receptors in several solid tumor cell lines. These bisindole compounds also exhibit low cytotoxicity in animal xenograft studies while exhibiting potent antitumor effects. They will continue to identify chemical structural features that are important for ligand-dependent antitumor effects in order to develop compounds that could be used for cancer chemotherapy.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Thacker
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Dr. Thacker was thrilled to receive this award. She said it feels great to have others excited about her research as well and have the support from the specialty section. Her research is focused on exploring the biomarker potential of hepatocyte-derived exosomes to predict intrinsic and idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Specifically, these studies aimed to optimize methods for hepatocyte-derived exosome enrichment as well as hepatocyte cell culture; methods that hadn't previously been optimized. They can now utilize these approaches to identify novel biomarkers for DILI and IDILI. A future goal is to use these biomarkers in the development of an in vitro screen of lead compounds to predict their DILI and IDILI potential.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka Trivedi
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Dr. Trivedi was really excited and pleased when she received this award. She immediately went to her advisor’s office to share this good news with him and also to thank him for all his support and encouragement. She is clearly committed to a career in toxicology research and this award will provide recognition to her work and complement her research in the field of toxicology. She will use this award as a springboard for her career in which she will make important contributions to advancing our understanding of toxicology research. Kidney fibrosis, the hallmark of the chronic kidney disease, is an irreversible process leading to the life threatening end-stage renal failure. Unfortunately there is no effective therapeutic cure for this serious condition. Her research focuses on identifying and validating druggable targets for kidney fibrosis. Using RNA sequencing, she identified phospholipase D4 (PLD4) as one of the targets for the treatment of kidney fibrosis. Proposed project for this award was to decipher a mechanistic role of PLD4 in the regulation of fibrosis. Mechanistically, they show that PLD4 facilitates fibrogenesis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses thereby promoting a TGF-ß signaling pathway. Moreover, PLD4 induced the expression of a1-antitrypsin protein (a serine protease inhibitor) that resulted in subsequent down-regulation of a protease neutrophil elastase (NE) expression, thereby leading to the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins. Further, PLD4 induced tyrosine receptor kinase A (TrkA)-mediated MAPK signaling. Interestingly, therapeutic targeting of PLD4 using specific siRNA also protected the mice from FA-induced kidney fibrosis by inhibiting TGF-ß signaling and activating NE. In conclusion, their findings identified PLD4 as a novel therapeutic target for kidney fibrosis - an unmet medical need.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Wenyi Wang
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Dr. Wang is very excited and thankful. She feels this is an acknowledgement of her work by SOT and is encouraged to work harder through the end. Constructed computational methods to precisely predict properties of nanoparticles, in purpose of prioritizing nanoparticle drugs with wanted properties and unwanted toxicities.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Elijah Weber
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington
Mr. Weber was ecstatic when he received the award! He felt honored with the opportunity to be a selected finalist in the poster competition and had a wonderful time presenting his work alongside such amazing work in the scientific community. This award will help him to pursue research greatly by now enabling him to fund scientific and technical training courses. His work involves modeling the kidney, in particular the segment of the kidney most prone to injury, using an "organ-on-a-chip" system that cultures kidney cells in a three dimensional orientation. Using a system that best reflects the human kidney microenvironment, he and colleagues can model toxicity of known toxic compounds and assess safety of novel compounds to advance drug discovery and development. Accurate safety assessments can be achieved in a system without the use of preclinical animal models thus reducing, refining, and eventually replacing animal use. Future goals of this work include integration of organ types to understand organ-organ interactions which may play key roles in underlying mechanisms of toxicity. He has used this system to assess a classical nephrotoxin, Polymyxin B, as well as structural analogues observed to have improved safety profiles. Using a drug discovery toxicological approach, he has generated results that parallel preclinical findings of safety for novel compounds using a novel organ-on-a-chip 3D kidney system.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Melanie Abongwa
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University
Melanie Abongwa is a graduate student at Iowa State University and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for her work entitled, "In vitro filaricidal activity, cytotoxicity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts of Daniellia oliveri and Psorospermum febrifugum." research involves identifying natural plants with anthelmintic properties based on ethnopharmacological information, testing the efficacy of extracts from these plants on nematode parasites, identifying the chemical compounds that account for activity, determining the mode of action of these compounds, and assessing their toxicity using mammalian cells and/or animal models. The overall goal of this research is to isolate non-toxic chemical compounds with anthelmintic properties from medicinal plants which could be donated to philanthropic agencies or pharmaceutical companies for the development of the much needed drugs for treatment of nematode parasite infections. She hopes that her studies will identify compounds from medicinal plants that alone or in combination could have enhanced selective activity against nematode parasites compared to existing anthelmintics, inform on the mode of action and toxicity of the compounds, and as well identify new targets for anthelmintic drugs. These findings will go a long way to contribute towards anthelmintic therapeutic drug discovery, as there are currently a limited number of anthelmintics, and for which concerns of resistance development is on the rise.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amrendra Ajay
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: 1980

Amrendra Ajay is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Medical School and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoctoral Award for his work entitled, "SMOC2 mediates kidney fibrosis via activating fibroblasts." Kidney toxicity is a major problem worldwide causing high mortality every year. Due to lack of therapeutic targets and early and sensitive biomarker it is impossible to detect and treat chronic kidney diseases. His team employed RNA sequencing approach to find out the early and sensitive biomarker and therapeutic target for chronic kidney injury. Secreted Modular Calcium Binding protein 2 (SMOC2) is one of the potential early and sensitive biomarker as well as therapeutic target for chronic kidney disease. SMOC2 is expressed by kidney fibroblasts that cause fibrosis. Using transgenic mice they show that SMOC2 causes kidney fibrosis. Thus his team proposes that inhibition of SMOC2 may be of therapeutic importance for kidney fibrosis. He would like to focus his research in finding the mechanisms of toxicity based molecular signaling. Finding new molecular signatures and signaling cascade may provide better understanding of the toxicity at cellular level and its translation in the animal models or in humans.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Monica Langley
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University
Monica Langely is a graduate student at Iowa State University and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for her work entitled, "Preclinical Efficacy Testing of the Mitochondria Targeted Antioxidant Mito-apocynin in the Transgenic MitoPark Mouse Model of Chronic Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration." In this study, she evaluated the neuroprotective efficacy of an orally active apocynin derivative with increased mitochondrial bioavailability in the MitoPark model. Her team discovered that mito-apocynin was able to improve locomotor deficits, neuronal loss and dopamine levels in these mice and additionally identified markers of oxidative stress and inflammation that are increased in MitoPark mice at 24wks. Mito-apocynin was able to attenuate levels of oxidative stress markers and almost completely inhibit reactive microgliosis in MitoPark mice. These findings indicate a neuroprotective role of mito-apocynin that should be considered for further clinical development of the compound for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Chelsea Snyder
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: UC-Davis
Chelsea Snyder is a graduate student at University of California Davis and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for her work entitled, "Human iPSC Neurons: in vitro Models to Predict Clinical Neurotoxicity." Neurotoxicity is a major cause of new drugs being pulled from clinical trials. This is due, in part, to a lack in ability of current preclinical animal models to predict these adverse effects. She feels there is strong need for a model more relevant to humans. Primary human neurons are not readily renewable resource, and immortalized human neuronal cell lines are of cancer origins. Thus, her project sought to establish a more relevant model, in human induced pluripotent stem cells, to attempt to bridge this gap between species differences. Using test compounds, she has developed a platform that assesses neurotoxicity through multiple functional endpoints and has the potential to provide early predictive utility in the drug development process. Ultimately, her research helps us grasp a drug candidate’s neurotoxic liabilities before investing in nonclinical and clinical evaluation. This helps streamline the drug development process, so that cutting edge, novel therapeutics can become available to the public in a faster, safer way.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tamara Tal
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tamara Tal is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoctoral Award for her work entitled, "Leveraging an integrative predictive toxicity model and zebrafish and in vitro angiogenesis assays to identify chemical vascular disruptors during development." Her research centers on evaluating and improving a computational model of developmental vascular toxicity using a combination of alternative models including zebrafish. The computational model was built to predict whether over one thousand environmental chemicals disrupt blood vessel development. The predictions are based on a series of 109 surrogate cell and biochemical assays. In the absence of in vivo data, the model ranks chemicals based on their putative ability to cause blood vessel toxicity during development. her research, in collaboration with several other groups, tested the computational model’s predictions on vessel development in a genetically modified zebrafish embryo. The findings from this work show that zebrafish detect certain types of vascular disruptors and that data collected in zebrafish can be used to improve model predictions.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Muhammet Ay
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University
Muhammet Ay is a graduate student at Iowa State University and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for his work entitled, “Quercetin Treatment Protects Progressive Nigral Dopaminergic Neuronal Degeneration in Cell Culture and MitoPark Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease by Activating PKD1 Signaling.” His study used a natural herbal compound quercetin as a potential neuroprotective agent for Parkinson's disease. They used in vitro and in vivo tools to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of this compound. First, they tested if this compound has any effect on mitochondrial function and neuroprotective signaling pathways. After finding that this compound can improve mitochondrial function, they tested this compound in a new transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease and found that quercetin can reverse the behavioral deficits and dopaminergic neuronal cell loss in this mouse model. Their results suggest that quercetin can activate the neuroprotective signaling pathways and is a promising neuroprotective drug candidate for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Church
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences

Rachel Church is a Postdoctoral Fellow at The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoc Award for her work entitled, “Doxorubicin-Induced Glomerular Injury is Associated with Urinary MicroRNA Alterations in the Rat.” Traditional biomarkers (such as alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine) utilized for monitoring organ injury are often non-specific and insensitive. These biomarkers can often become elevated for multiple reasons, not necessarily reflecting organ injury. Additionally, they may not become elevated until a significant degree of damage has already occurred. MicroRNAs have potential to outperform current biomarkers. MicroRNAs are relatively stable in biofluids, show high species conservation and can be organ-specific. They have been identified in multiple biofluids including blood and urine. An example of a sensitive microRNA biomarker is miR-122. This species is highly enriched in the liver and is released into circulation following hepatocellular injury. Data shows that miR-122 is more sensitive for detection of hepatic injury than alanine aminotransferase. Identification of microRNA biomarkers for use in nonclinical drug development may result in early detection compounds with a liability to cause organ damage. These compounds can be removed from development and can be replaced by safer alternatives. Additionally, because microRNAs show high species conservation, they may have translatable value. Drug induced organ injury is a serious complication that arises in the clinic. Finally, these biomarkers may be useful in identifying potential toxicities resulting from any toxic exposure, including environmental or occupational exposures. Dr. Church believes her research will promote a safer and healthier world by reducing drug-induced organ injury.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Goldsmith
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: National Toxicology Program

Rachel Goldsmith is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Toxicology Program and won the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoc Award for her work entitled, “Analysis of High-Throughput, High-Content Data in a C. elegans-Based Toxicity Assay.” Her research focused on developing a rapid, inexpensive method for testing toxicity of a wide range of compounds. She used a small nematode (C. elegans) that activates genes in response to many toxins similar to how those genes are activated by humans when exposed to toxins. This nematode is small and very easy to work with, but is a whole animal with separate organ systems, just like mammals used in more traditional toxicity testing. The nematodes used had genes added to them so that when the gene of interest turned on, they would fluoresce red. After treating the nematodes with a toxin, pictures were taken using a high-content imager, a microscope designed to rapidly acquire high-resolution images. Once she had pictures of the nematodes, Rachel used software to digitally measure how much of each nematode was fluorescing red. Since the amount of red fluorescence was directly related to the gene being turned on, she compared how six different genes responded to five different compounds. The results showed that when a gene was related to the way that a toxin causes damage (for example, a metal responsive gene and a heavy metal toxin), the gene increased. She was able to successfully measure the gene increase in a rapid, easy and inexpensive manner. This method could be used for genes of particular interest to drug discovery or drug toxicity, particularly if the biology of the drug is well understood. It is her hope that this assay, and others like it, will contribute to a safer and healthier world.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kazuhisa Miyakawa
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BVSc
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Kazuhisa Miyakawa is a graduate student at the Michigan State University and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for his work entitled, “Contribution of Par-4 and Thrombin to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in Mice.” His work focused on evaluating the contribution of one of the thrombin receptors known to exist on mouse platelets using genetic modification (ie, deleting the receptor in mice) and further evaluating the contribution of thrombin using a direct thrombin inhibitor. Both of these modifications resulted in decreased liver injury from acetaminophen. Furthermore, both caused a decrease in thrombin activation and platelet accumulation in the liver, further supporting the importance of thrombin and platelets in APAP hepatotoxicity in mice. The results presented at 2014 SOT indicate that platelets and protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR-4) contribute to amplification of thrombin generation and to the progression of liver injury from APAP overdose. The results raise the possibility that platelet-directed intervention might provide adjunctive therapy in APAP poisoning cases. Also, many of the drugs that cause drug-induced liver injury (including idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury) seem to involve a progression events similar to APAP hepatotoxicity. The contributions of thrombin and platelets to these other drug toxicities have not been evaluated yet, and such evaluation might lead to adjunctive therapies for other drugs that cause liver injury.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Roshni Rao
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina
Roshni Rao is a graduate student at the University of South Carolina and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award for her work entitled, “Δ9Tetrahydrocannabinol prevents mice from Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced toxic death by the modulation of the miR-17-92 cluster and de novo induction of T-regulatory cells.” Her work focuses on the therapeutic application of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a marijuana derived compound in the treatment against Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)induced lung toxicity. While we find that the toxin, a potent inflammatory agent causes the death of mice, THC, a known anti-inflammatory compound protects mice. We show that a novel mechanism behind THC's activity could possibly be it's ability to modulate microRNA (miRNA),recently discovered regulators of gene expression. Since basic research has only recently begun to highlight the myriad anti-inflammatory properties of THC, this award encourages us to continue studying the compound in the context of severe toxicity. By carefully dissecting its efficacy and immunological activity, we hope our research will result in its use as a potential therapeutic drug.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Hua Shen
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: UC Berkeley

Hua Shen is a Postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at Berkeley and received the Emil A Pfitzer Drug Discovery Postdoc Award for her work entitled, “Functional Genetic Screen in Human Haploid Cells to Identify Genes Involved in Susceptibility to Chemical Exposure.” Her work focused on developing a novel genetic screening platform using human haploid cells for chemical and drug gene susceptibility. This semi-solid medium based screening strategy, which simultaneously screens and generates colonies from cells resistant to the test compounds, shortens the entire screening process by approximately two to three weeks. Using this promising and efficient genetic screening platform, we are able to broadly probe genomic responses of chemicals, identify novel susceptibility genes, and gain insight into potential mechanisms of toxicity from chemical exposure.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Church
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes of Health Sciences

Rachel Church is a postdoctoral fellow of The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences and she received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for her work entitled, “Identification of Genomic Regions Linked to Epigallochatechin Gallate Induced Liver Toxicity Using the Diversity Outbred Stock.” Epigallochatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major component found in green tea and is thought to be responsible for all the positive health benefits associated with the consumption of green tea. Because of these health benefits, EGCG is sold as an herbal supplement. However, following ingestion of EGCG in its supplement form, patients are showing up in the clinic with cases of liver toxicity thought to result from EGCG. In an attempt to identify genetic regions linked to EGCG-induced hepatic injury, Dr. Church and her colleagues used a diverse mouse population, the Diversity Outbred stock, to perform genome wide association mapping linked to EGCG-induced changes in ALT. This mapping identified a region of variation on Chromosome 4, specific to the NOD mouse strain, which seems to confer resistance to EGCG-induced ALT changes on animals that carry it. This award will help Dr. Church pursue her research by generating interest in the project.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Monica Langley
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Monica Langley is a graduate student of Iowa State University and she received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for her worked entitled, “Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Histological Characterization of a Novel MitoPark Mouse Model.” Her research involved MitoPark mice, which were (and necessary parental colonies) genotyped, cared for, and behaviorally analyzed. Additionally, the mice were treated daily for one month with manganese for one study, and mito-apocyanin for another. At sacrifice, she and her colleagues did a perfusion and a dissection of the tissues. Later, they were used for techniques such as immunohistochemistry, western blot, and HPLC.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mili Mandal
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Mili Mandal is a postdoctoral fellow of Rutgers University and she received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for her work entitled, “Spleen as a Source of Inflammatory Macrophages: Role in Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity.” Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used over the counter pain-killer and fever reducer. At therapeutic doses, it is considered safe and effective; however, toxic doses leads to hepatotoxicity, which is by far the most common cause of acute liver failure in US and UK. Monocytes/macrophages, cells of innate immune system have been shown to play an important role in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the origin of these cells has not been established. Splenic monocytes/macrophages have been shown to accumulate at inflammatory sites following tissue injury. In the present studies, she and her colleagues analyzed the contribution of splenic monocytes/macrophages to liver inflammation and injury induced by APAP. Their data demonstrate, for the first time, a role of the spleen as a reservoir for proinflammatory monocytes/macrophages in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Her career goal is to become an independent research scientist in the field of immuno-toxicology. Her long-term research interests involve understanding the role of Th17 cells and their interaction with other innate and adaptive immune cells as well as inflammatory mediators in liver inflammation caused by hepatitis C (HCV). Treatments for patients with HCV are suboptimal and there is no vaccine available to prevent it.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kazuhisa Miyakawa
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: DVM
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Kazuhisa Miyakawa is a graduate student of Michigan State University and received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for his work entitled, “Platelet Depletion Reduces Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in Mice.” Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the US. Treatment for this toxicity is limited and there are interests in evaluating the possible progressive events that might lead to alternative treatments. He and his colleagues evaluated the contribution of platelets in this hepatotoxicity and suggested that platelets play a role in the generation of thrombin. They also evaluated the direct effect of thrombin on hepatocytes by isolating primary hepatocytes, however there was no direct effect. He wants to contribute to the research in the field of drug induced liver injury.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Arya Sobhakumari
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: DVM
Institution/Affiliation: University of Iowa

Arya Sobhakumari is a PhD candidate of the University of Iowa and she received the Emil Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for her work entitled, “Role of NOX4 Mediated Autophagy in Reducing Cytotoxic Effects of EGFR Inhibitor Erlotinib in Head and Neck Cancer Cells.” Her research explored why head and neck cancers have become resistant to chemotherapy agent erlotinib after an initial favorable response. Her research focused on finding the mechanism that reduced the efficacy of erlotinib. The idea was that manipulating/inhibiting that specific mechanism would increase the treatment efficacy of erlotinib. She would like to play a part in the research that will find alternative methods for reducing the chemical burden on the body and find out cures for diseases that ensures that the toxicity or side effects to the patients are minimal.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Durga Tripathi
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Biosciences & Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center

Durga Tripathi is a postdoctoral student of Texas A & M Health Science Center and he received the Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Award for his work entitled, “Reactive Nitrogen Species Regulate Autophagy through ATM-AMPK-TSC2-mediated Suppression of mTORC1.” Nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological process. He identified a novel pathway by which nitrosative stress induced autophagy and killed the cancer cells. Suppression of mTORC1 induced autophagy and cell death in breast cancer cells, which are resistant towards apoptosis. As cancer cells are particularly sensitive to nitrosative stress, these data open new avenues for therapies capitalizing on the ability of RNS to induce autophagic cell death. He would like to advance the science of toxicology by delineating the role of autophagy in cancer and participate in CE courses.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jennifer Foreman
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University

Jennifer Foreman, of Penn State University, for her work entitled, “Developmental and Species-Specific Sensitivity of PPARa Agonist-Induced Hepatic Effects.” Her work focused on the differences in liver injury in mice and humans after exposure to a drug developed to treat hypolipidemia. She and her team also investigated whether exposure during development sensitized individuals to the toxic effects of the compound. She would like to discover models that are more applicable to the human condition.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rhiannon Hardwick
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS, BFA Ballet Pedagogy
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Rhiannon Hardwick, of the University of Arizona, for her work entitled, “Increased Susceptibility to Drug-Induced Toxicity in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.” Her project involved an investigation of susceptibility to multiorgan drug-induced toxicity in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Her dissertation work involves understanding how nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) alters drug metabolism and disposition. Co-morbibities of NAFLD include obesity and type 2 diabetes and she hopes that her research brings awareness to the healthcare community about the necessity of understanding the risk of toxicity in the patient population upon administration of pharmaceuticals.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Aik Jiang Lau
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The University of British Columbia

Aik Jiang Lau, of the University of British Columbia, for his abstract titled, “Functional Analysis of the SV23, SV24, and SV25 Splice Variants of Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR): Comparison of Ginkgo Biloba Extract with Other Known Activators of CAR.” Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) controls the transcription of genes involved in a broad array of biological functions, including bioactivation and detoxification of toxicants, inflammation, glucose and lipid metabolism. This receptor exists in various isoforms in the liver. The purpose of his work is to compare the functionality of four different CAR isoforms using five different chemicals/drugs/natural products (Ginkgo biloba extract). Key findings indicate that the four different CAR isoforms respond differently to different chemicals/drugs/natural products. He is passionate about research and wants to continue in scientific research. His research interest is in drug-induced toxicities and the mechanisms underlying these toxicities. In the future, he hopes to advance the science of toxicology by finding ways/in vitro methods to better predict drug-induced toxicities and to prevent the toxicities. The overall goal is to ensure the safety of drugs to patients.

Emil A. Pfitzer Drug Discovery Student Award Fund

Recipient: Michael Rouse
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina School of Medicine

Michael Rouse, of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, for his work entitled, “Indoles Alleviate the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyeltitis (EAE) by Activation of Aryl Hydrocarbon and Estrogen Receptors Leading to Altered micro-RNA Regulation and Suppression of Th17 Activation.” He and his group examined how I3C and DIM could be used as both a preventative as well as a therapeutic treatment option for an active MS disease state. He hopes to develop safer, more effective treatments for the many disabling diseases and illnesses of the world.

Environmental Carcinogenesis Research Fellowship Fund

Recipient: Tasha Thong
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Michigan

Ms. Thong was excited and encouraged to know that the work she finds interesting and meaningful is also of interest to other top scientists in her field. This award will help to support her travel to SOT where she will be able to share the work she is passionate about with others.

Ms. Thong's research project is focused on uncovering the biological basis for racial disparities in breast cancer between African American (AA) and European American (EA) women. At every age, African American women have worse breast cancer outcomes, yet the biological basis for this is still unknown. Ms. Thong believes that stem cells play a crucial role in carcinogenesis, and she cultured normal breast tissue from healthy volunteers in order to characterize differences between mammary stem cells between AA and EA women. Thus far she has used single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptomic profiles of her samples, and her future work will involve epigenetic profiling as well as challenging the samples with exposure to environmental toxicants.

Environmental Carcinogenesis Research Fellowship Fund

Recipient: Eric Uwimana
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Dr. Uwimana was thrilled and humbled to receive the first Environmental Carcinogenesis Award. This is an encouragement in his research and will contribute to his travel to the SOT meeting where he will share his research and exchange ideas with fellow researchers in the field.

Naphthalene (NA) is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are widely exposed. NA causes nasal and lung tumors in adult rats and mice and it has been classified as a possible human carcinogen. The mechanism of NA carcinogenicity, which may involve both genotoxic and non-genotoxic events, is not clear. A prerequisite for NA’s toxicity in the respiratory tract is bioactivation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Dr. Uwimana's research focuses on identifying liver-generated Naphthalene metabolites that may contribute to lung toxicity and carcinogenicity in vivo and characterize lung NA-DNA adducts formed in vitro and in vivo in NA-exposed mice and human lung cells. The long-term goal is to define the metabolic mechanisms that influence NA-mediated lung carcinogenesis in experimental animals and humans. The outcome of these studies is expected to improve assessment of human lung cancer risks from exposures to NA and other related chemicals and facilitate cancer prevention.

Founders Award

Recipient: Sidney Green
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD, ATS
Institution/Affiliation: Howard University

Through his more than 50 years as a practicing toxicologist, Dr. Green has made major contributions to academia, industry, and government for which he has earned the 2020 SOT Founders Award (for Outstanding Leadership in Toxicology).

Dr. Green joined the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) as a pharmacologist in 1965, after spending several years in industry. He received his PhD in biochemical pharmacology from Howard University in 1972. Through various roles at US FDA—most recently as Director of the Division of Toxicological Research—Dr. Green contributed to safety decision-making by ensuring appropriate research information was available to facilitate the development of regulatory guidelines used to establish safe versus unsafe exposure levels for chemical and physical agents that humans encounter daily. His efforts as the Agency’s chief spokesperson in the area of alternative tests contributed significantly to the establishment of the Interagency Regulatory Alternatives Group, which set the stage for the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods.

Dr. Green’s contributions to safety decision-making continued through his role at the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), where he served as Chief of the Toxic Effects Branch, Health Review Division, in the Office of Toxic Substances. In this role, he and other members of the branch represented US EPA on many Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) scientific panels responsible for developing toxicological guidelines for the testing of materials by OECD members. He also chaired the US EPA GeneTox Committee, the charge of which was to review the status of most of the methods used in genetic toxicology.

Joining Covance Inc. as Director of the Department of Toxicology in 1995, Dr. Green was charged with ensuring the appropriateness of studies in multispecies for generating data to support safety-of-use requirements for designated products as part of the premarket approval process. Then, in 1998, Dr. Green joined Howard University College of Medicine as an Adjunct Associate Professor of pharmacology, a position he continues to hold.

Dr. Green also served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Toxicity Testing. He was a member of the committee, the efforts of which resulted in the 2007 publication of Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, which has been instrumental in changing how toxicologists think about the approach to safety evaluation. In addition, Dr. Green has authored more than 70 publications, primarily on topics involving genetic toxicology, short-term test methodology, and policy issues associated with alternatives to animal testing.

Dr. Green has been actively involved in SOT since 1974 in appointed, elected, and volunteer capacities. His service includes positions on Council, as Chair of the Membership Committee, and as President of several Component Groups. In addition to service to SOT, Dr. Green is a Past President of the American College of Toxicology, Association of Government Toxicologists, and Academy of Toxicological Sciences.

Founders Fund

Recipient: Lois D. Lehman-McKeeman
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD, ATS
Institution/Affiliation: Bristol-Myers Squibb

For her dedication to and record of working to enhance human health and influence decision-making and for her service within SOT, Dr. Lehman-McKeeman has been awarded the 2019 Founders Award (for Outstanding Leadership in Toxicology). Dr. Lehman-McKeeman earned her PhD in toxicology from the University of Kansas Medical Center. Through her current position as vice president of Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Lehman-McKeeman leads a group that integrates toxicology, drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmaceutics, and analytical sciences to support the discovery of high-quality drug candidates. At Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Lehman-McKeeman has conducted and led basic research that supported advancement of new drug candidates, including significant mechanistic work to establish the human safety of Baraclude (an antiviral drug). Additionally, her research efforts to elucidate the mechanism of α2u-globulin nephropathy in inducing male rat renal cell cancer established a mechanism of rodent carcinogenesis that was not human relevant. As a result of this work by Dr. Lehman-McKeeman, many chemicals that induce male rat kidney cancer are now understood not to represent cancer risks in humans. Outside of the laboratory, Dr. Lehman-McKeeman has played a pivotal role in SOT through her dedication to Toxicological Sciences. She was named as an associate editor when the journal launched and served as Editor-in-Chief from 2002–2011. Dr. Lehman-McKeeman’s contributions to SOT also are exemplified in her service as the 2013–2014 SOT President and her positions on several SOT committees.

Founders Fund

Recipient: Ruth A. Roberts
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD, ATS, FBTS, ERT, FRSB, FRCPath
Institution/Affiliation: ApconiX

Dr. Roberts is chair and director of drug discovery at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, and director and co-founder of ApconiX, a provider of nonclinical safety expertise. Previously, she worked in senior roles in regulatory safety globally, drug discovery and development, and scientific strategy for companies such as AstraZeneca, ICI, Syngenta, and Aventis. In a career spanning 30 years, Dr. Roberts is an expert multidisciplinary and influential scientist working at the intersection where industry meets academia. A graduate of the University of Manchester, she received her PhD in 1987. She was bestowed the SOT Achievement Award in 2002 for her contributions to the molecular understanding of toxicity and received the EUROTOX Bo Holmstedt Award in 2008 in recognition of scientific excellence in the area of drug and chemical safety. Dr. Roberts has authored more than 140 peer-reviewed publications. Her reputation as a world-class investigator in drug and chemical safety is evidenced by more than 30 invitations to speak about her research from all over the world within the last 10 years. She is a highly-sought-after expert in drug discovery and development problem solving and scientific strategy. More recently, Dr. Roberts’ focus has been on translational research in the understanding of the influence of ion channel research on development of new therapeutics. Her current strategies rely on the synthesis of basic research and clinical application to gain further, more in-depth understanding with a goal of improving human health. Dr. Roberts’ dedication to leadership within the field of toxicology is clearly demonstrated, such as her service as chair for the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Emerging Issues Committee, which helps to determine the next level for research topics for a global organization to improve approaches to risk assessment and safety. Furthermore, she has been elected to the presidential chain of societies such as The British Toxicology Society, EUROTOX, and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and currently is serving as SOT secretary.

 

Founders Fund

Recipient: Meryl Karol
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD, ATS
Institution/Affiliation:

Dr. Karol received her PhD in immunochemistry from Columbia University, and she completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Biochemistry at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. In 1974, she joined the faculty of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health as a research associate. She became a tenured professor in 1985 and served in other capacities until her retirement in 2006, when she was associate dean for academic affairs and research. She is currently a professor emerita for the University of Pittsburgh. In a career spanning almost four decades, Dr. Karol has been actively engaged in research that has advanced the role of toxicology in safety decision making. She has published extensively on chemically induced allergy and asthma and individual susceptibility to allergic diseases (holding patents related to this research) and is published widely on improving indoor air quality to sustain public health. Dr. Karol gained international renown for her work in environmental epidemiology and immunotoxicology, particularly on the mechanisms of chemical toxicity. In 1984, Dr. Karol was sent by the US State Department to Bhopal, India, to investigate the thousands of deaths associated with methyl isocyanate and similar chemicals used in the production of polyurethane foams, paints, lacquer, and electrical insulation. In conjunction with laboratories in India, she worked to assess the immunologic effects of the chemicals by using serum samples. Her worked prepared her to consult with multinational companies on ways to safely handle the chemicals to protect employees and the public health. She later developed a method to detect isocyanates and a test procedure to detect the development of adverse immune hypersensitivity response to isocyanates. Dr. Karol’s research on isocyanates was instrumental in the establishment of safe occupational exposure levels that are cited by many international regulators. Another area of Dr. Karol’s expertise is allergic sensitization from skin and pulmonary exposure to formaldehyde. Her research in this area resulted in the development of an animal model of formaldehyde sensitization. A recognized expert in this field, she provided testimony before the US Congress on formaldehyde levels in US Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) trailers. Dr. Karol has published more than 177 publications in peer-reviewed journals and 22 book chapters. She has mentored 28 graduate students who have completed master’s degrees or theses, in addition to six doctoral students. Highly respected in her field, Dr. Karol has served on several important national scientific advisory committees and panels and worked with many government agencies, including the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment, National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Toxicology, US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), and US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). Dr. Karol has been an SOT member since 1981. In addition to serving on all of the major SOT Committees, she holds the distinction of being the first woman to be elected president of the Society (1994?1995). Additionally, she was the first woman to serve as secretary-general for the International Union of Toxicology (IUTOX) and served with distinction on the board of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences (ATS).

Founders Fund

Recipient: Richard Adamson
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation:

Dr. Richard Adamson, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 2016 SOT Founders Award. During his distinguished career spanning over four decades, Dr. Adamson has used state-of-the art approaches to distinguish between safe and unsafe doses for humans in many ways. For newborns Dr. Adamson demonstrated that not only weight was a factor in administration of a dose to infants but , allowing for the development of drug metabolizing enzymes in the infant was also a major factor to reduce sensitivity to drugs. In the use of antibiotics in surgical procedures and myasthenia gravis, he and his colleagues demonstrated the synergy between some antibiotics and neuromuscular blocking agents as very important interactions between muscle relaxants. In studying absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of folic acid antagonists, he found dichloromethotrexate (DCM) was metabolized by liver enzymes and Methotrexate (MTX) was generally excreted by the kidneys. This suggested that DCM was the better folic acid antagonist for use when renal function is impaired, or in the case of immunosuppression such as cases of kidney transplantation. In working with the National Research Council, Dr. Adamson was invited to a committee to investigate the safety of platinum catalytic converters in cars. The Committee concluded that the platinum and palladium emitted from automobiles was small and the chemical form and lack of methylation by microorganisms posed no known threat to the environment or individuals. His work with a Department of Health and Human Services committee reviewed the benefit and risks of fluoride in the use for prevention of dental cavities. The committee supported the use of fluoride in drinking water, toothpastes, mouth rinses, and fluoride dietary supplements at optimal levels. Dr. Adamson also investigated the carcinogenic potential of food additives, food contaminants, and pesticides. His long-term study of the use of saccharin without toxic effects led in part to various regulatory agencies to remove saccharin from their lists of carcinogens. He helped determine that MOPP combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin’s disease caused toxicity due partly to the use of procarbazine which led to the development by oncologists of other first line therapies for Hodgkin’s disease. Working with Japanese investigators he found that heterocyclic amines resulting from cooking meat were carcinogenic, and determined that certain methods of cooking could reduce their formation. More recently, he has spoken out about the safety and benefits of caffeine consumption. Dr. Adamson has been a steadfast member of the Society having joined in 1973. He served as the Society of Toxicology liaison to the American Association for Cancer Research. Among the many Awards and Honors he has received, in 1989 he was presented with the SOT Arnold J. Lehman Award.

Founders Fund

Recipient: John Thomas
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation:

Dr. John A. Thomas, PhD, DATS, FACT, is awarded the 2014 SOT Founders Award. Dr. Thomas received his PhD from the University of Iowa in 1961. Currently he a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Texas Health Science Center - San Antonio, in Texas; as well as an Adjunct Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana. Throughout his distinguished career, Dr. Thomas’s contributions to toxicological sciences in many different areas ranging from the safety of nutrients and food ingredients, to pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, health promoting agents and environmental chemicals have been highly recognized by his peers and the scientific community. He continues to be an educator and a scientist, and the discipline of toxicology will continue to benefit from his vision and leadership. During his years in academia, he mentored undergraduate and graduate students, post doctoral fellows and numerous colleagues. In addition to his several decades as an educator in the United States and internationally, Dr. Thomas has volunteered his expertise as a member of various governmental science boards and advisory committees, on various editorial boards, and has provided his expertise as a consultant to the FDA, National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Defense. Dr. Thomas is a past-President of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and also the American College of Toxicology. He is a Fellow in the American College of Toxicology and also the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences As a member of SOT since 1971, Dr. Thomas has served as an SOT Continuing Education Lecturer (1983, 1985, and 1988); SOT Councilor (1985-1987); President of two Regional Chapter Executive Committees: Midwest Chapter (1988) and Gulf Coast Chapter (now Lone Star Chapter- 1998); and as the SOT Education Committee Chair (2000). He is the recipient of multiple prestigious awards including the SOT Merit Award (1998) and both the Commissioner’s and Distinguished Service Awards from the FDA.

Founders Fund

Recipient: William Suk
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD, MPH
Institution/Affiliation: NIEHS-NIH

William Alfred Suk, PhD, MPH, is the 2013 SOT Founders Award recipient. Dr. Suk has served as director of the Superfund Hazardous Substances Basic Research and Training Program (Superfund Research Program) since its inception. He is also director of the Center for Risk & Integrated Sciences (CRIS) at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). His affiliation with a number of organizations and committees include: Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences; International Advisory Board of the Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok, Thailand; and World Health Organization Consultation on Scientific Principles and Methodologies for Assessing Health Risks in Children Associated with Chemical Exposures. He is also a member of a number of trans-NIH committees. Dr. Suk received his PhD in microbiology from the George Washington University and his Masters in Public Health in health policy from the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He sits on the editorial boards of a number of international journals, including Environmental Health, Toxicology and Environmental Chemistry, International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, and the Central European Journal of Public Health. Dr. Suk has been a National Science Foundation Fellow. The NIH has honored him for his many efforts and he has received the HHS Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service. He is a recipient of the Roy E. Albert Memorial Award for Translational Research in Environmental Health from the University of Cincinnati; the Child Health Advocacy Award from the Children’s Environmental Health Network; the John P. Wyatt Lecture Award in Environmental Health and Disease from the University of Kentucky; and the Adel F. Sarofim Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement in Championing Research on the Origin, Fate and Health Effects of Combustion Emissions. In addition to these many honors, he is a Fellow of the Collegium Ramazzini. The Society is pleased to present Dr. Suk with the 2013 SOT Founders Award, sponsored by the SOT Endowment Fund.

Founders Fund

Recipient: John A. Moore
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: DVM, DABT
Institution/Affiliation: Hollyhouse Inc

John A. Moore, DVM, DABT, is presented the 2012 SOT Founders Award in recognition of his outstanding leadership in fostering the role of toxicological sciences in safety decision-making through the development and application of state-of-the-art approaches that elucidate, with a high degree of confidence, the distinctions for humans between safe and unsafe exposures to chemical and physical agents. Dr. Moore has distinguished himself in various governmental and private positions, holding a number of senior positions in the US government, including Deputy Administrator and Assistant Administrator for Pesticides and Toxic Substances of the US EPA, Deputy Director of the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and Director of Toxicology Research and Testing at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). He served for ten years as founder and President and CEO of the not-for-profit Institute for Evaluating Health Risks (IEHR) and recently completed a five-year term as principal scientist at the NTP Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction. Dr. Moore has served on several National Research Council committees, including being chair of the Subcommittee on the Toxicity of Diisopropyl Methylphosphonate and a member of the Subcommittee on Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. Dr. Moore has also served as the President of the Toxicology Education Foundation. He also reviewed new scientific data and advised the manufacturer on additional studies that characterized the toxicity profile of perfluorinated chemicals such as PFOS. This work led to the quick withdrawal of such compounds from commercial use in an expedient and orderly manner. At IEHR and later for NTP’s Center for Evaluating Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR), he designed and implemented a program to comprehensively review toxicology and exposure data on reproductive and developmental toxicology. This resulted in the strongest documents on this important area of chemical safety. Although retired, Dr. Moore has continued to serve on various panels and boards. For his contributions to toxicology and to the safety assessment and regulation of chemicals, the Society recognizes Dr. John A. Moore as the 2012 SOT Founders Award recipient.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Robert Freeborn
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Mr. Freeborn was ecstatic upon notification of the award. He is a fifth-year PhD student and his abstract was the culmination of his thesis project. It was an honor to receive the Frank C. Lu award in recognition of his work. This award helped him establish a functional workspace in his home to continue remotely working electronically on his project efficiently.

The research of Mr. Freeborn's lab focuses on various food additives and metals and how they adversely affect adaptive immune responses. The work for this award focuses on the food additive, tBHQ, and how it impairs the T cell response to influenza virus infection. He generated a line of mice lacking the transcription factor, Nrf2, in T cells. Nrf2 is activated by tBHQ, so by eliminating it he can determine if tBHQ suppressed the immune response to influenza through activation of Nrf2. His future goals are to lead immunology discovery projects in a large biotech company, working closely with various departments to help get new products to patients with unmet needs.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Madelyn Huang
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: National Toxicology Program at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Dr. Huang is very honored to receive this award and is grateful to the Food Safety Specialty Section as she is passionate about food safety and toxicology. It is encouraging to see that her research is of interest to a broad audience. This award will facilitate her travel to the next SOT meeting to share her ongoing work and to identify next steps for her career.

As a postdoctoral fellow at the National Toxicology Program, their group has the opportunity to be study scientists for a variety of environmental chemicals of interest to the Program. It has been a valuable experience learning about and designing toxicity studies to evaluate safety, exposing her to a variety of sub-disciplines of toxicology. Dr. Huang's portfolio includes a number of consumer-product-related chemicals, such as dietary supplements, mycotoxins, and phthalates. The research for which she won the award is an investigation of how the chemical structure of perfluorinated compounds alters their toxicity. This kind of research is important for evaluating risk and/or predicting toxicity of other perfluorinated chemicals for which she does not have safety data. Her long-term career goal is to be a toxicologist advocating for public health, particularly as it relates to food safety and nutrition.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jeremy Gingrich
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

When Mr. Gingrich first heard that he received this award he was incredibly happy and proud of himself. The experiment from which his abstract was drawn took a lot of time and hard work, and such positive peer recognition of that is incredibly meaningful to Mr. Gingrich. This award will aid in funding his participation in a continuing education course, as well as provide some additional travel support to the 2020 SOT annual meeting.

Mr. Gingrich's research primarily investigates the impact of chemical exposures during pregnancy, mainly through diet or the environment, on the development of the placenta. In the future, he would like to make a career out of this interest, and pursue a position working in the field of experimental toxicology or risk assessment.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sumira Phatak
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Baccalaureate Degree
Institution/Affiliation: Utah State University

Ms. Phatak is both honored and humbled to be selected for such a prestigious award that greatly facilitates her attendance at the upcoming SOT meeting. She looks forward to meeting other members of the Food Safety Specialty Section, allowing her to network with leaders in her field and enhance her skill set. She beleives this opportunity will lead to the opening of doors in the next chapter of her career.

As a graduate student in the Benninghoff Laboratory, her innovative work explores the connection between nutrition, colon cancer, and epigenetic modifications. Immediately after arriving at Utah State, she began a multi-generational rodent study; having completed the preclinical portion, she recently moved on to a molecular investigation of mechanisms. The findings from this project will answer her questions about how the standard American diet influences the health outcome of grand-offspring, despite never being directly exposed themselves. Ultimately, she sees herself running her own research program that answers essential questions about how diet impacts disease states while optimizing lifestyle intervention strategies.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Blake Rushing
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS Chemistry
Institution/Affiliation: East Carolina University

When Mr. Rushing found out that he received the Frank C. Lu student award, he was absolutely ecstatic. He fels it is such a tremendous honor to be a recipient of this award and he is very grateful to be recognized for the work he put towards his dissertation research. Receiving such an award increases the attention that his lab receives which goes a long way towards improving the ability to share research with the rest of the world. His plan is to use the funds included in the award to support his travel to the SOT Annual Meeting where he can share my findings with other brilliant minds in the field and gain their feedback to bolster the quality of his work. His research is focused on detoxifying foods that are contaminated with a particular food toxin, aflatoxin B1. This toxin occurs naturally on foods worldwide due to production of a very common fungus that grows on crops. Aflatoxin B1 is also highly linked with the development of liver cancer, making exposure to this toxin highly concerning. The research that won this award was his development of a novel treatment method that can potentially be used on contaminated foods to deactivate the toxin. He and colleagues found that after processing foods with our method, the toxin is completely transformed into a new chemical form which no longer damages DNA, preventing the initiation of cancer. This finding can be used as a basis to make aflatoxin B1-contaminated food safe to eat again and hopefully reduce the occurrence of liver cancer worldwide. Firstly, his future goals include graduating with his PhD in Pharmacology & Toxicology in approximately a year from now. Afterwards, he hopes to stay in academia where he can continue to work on issues in food safety. His home state, North Carolina, is highly involved in agriculture making food toxicology a top priority for where he lives. It is his hope to learn as much as possible about the problems faced in food safety and use his research abilities to find solutions to provide safer and cleaner foods to people around the world.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Gopi Gadupudi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Iowa

Mr. Gadupudi's research involves understanding the toxicity of food-borne chemicals such as PCB126. Specifically, this work involves characterizing the dose and time dependent toxicity of PCB126 in causing metabolic disorders such as diabetes, fatty liver and metabolic syndrome. Moving forward, he and his colleagues would like to understand the mechanisms involved in the PCB or POP induced metabolic disruption. Understanding these mechanisms would definitely aid in identifying adverse effects on human health and risk characterization.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alexandra Turley
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS in Food Science from the University of Delaware, PhD in Pharmacology and Toxicology from Michigan State University (in progress)
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Alexandra Turley is a Graduate Student at Michigan State University and received the Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award for her work entitled, "The Food Additive tBHQ Inhibits Activation of Primary Human CD4 T Cells." Her research investigates the effects of a food preservative that activates a ubiquitous cell stress response pathway on the immune system, specifically T cells. This work adds to both work done on understating T cell function and work on safety of food ingredients. The immune system mediates host defense, and also is involved in the pathology of a number of diseases such as autoimmunity and allergy. Understanding the effects of xenobiotics, both from foods and other sources, on the immune system is needed to ensure that these compounds do not have negative health effects.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mansi Krishan
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University fo Cincinnati

Mansi Krishan is a PhD candidate at the University of Cincinnati and she received the Frank C. Lu Food Safety Students Award for her work entitled, “Toxicology and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures.” The purpose of her project is to research the state of science of the toxicology and risk assessment methodologies for chemical mixtures and to gather perspectives from regulatory agencies, scientific community and independent organizations regarding the on-going research on safety evaluation of chemical mixtures with a focus on food related chemical mixtures. Considering the current challenges in food mixtures such as heavy metals, pesticides and migrants from packaging, a case study was done to compare different methodologies and their applicability to food mixtures. Her research will help in understanding the landscape of toxicology and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. It will also help in identification and selection of most appropriate risk assessment methods for safety evaluation of chemical mixtures especially food related mixtures and contribute towards public health. She would like to create more awareness among students about the science of toxicology and how it relates to improving real life problems such as food safety and public health.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Brenna Flannery
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: Bachelor of Science
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Brenna Flannery is a graduate student of Michigan State University and she was the recipient of the Frank C. Lu for her work entitled, “Evaluation of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Acid-Labile Subunit as a Novel Biomarker of Effect to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol.” The goal of her project was to evaluate insulin-like growth factor as a potential biomarker of effect for the mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol (DON). In humans, DON is reported to cause symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever upon acute high dose exposure. Low dose chronic DON exposure in humans has been frequently assessed using the biomarker of exposure DON-glucuronide; however, long-term effects of low dose DON exposure have been impossible to assess due to lack of biomarker of effect. One potential biomarker of effect for DON is plasma IGFALS. She is hopeful the outcomes of this project will advance the field of food safety because the results will help us to understand and predict adverse effects of an adulterant in our food. The award helped her attend the 2013 Society of Toxicology Meeting, where she formed relationships with new colleagues, acquired new ideas for her research and she also learned about potential opportunities for her future in science.

Frank C. Lu Food Safety Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amanda Smolarek
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Amanda Smolarek, of Rugters Unviersity, for her work entitled, “Dietary Administration of Delta- and Gamma-Tocopherol Inhibits Mammary Carcinogenesis.” Her work is focused on estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. In the lab, she focused on the prevention of breast cancer by treatment with natural compounds. As a senior graduate student, she is planning to finish her thesis work by the summer 2012. She asserts that although one form, alpha-tocopherol, is a major antioxidant, other forms such as delta- and gamma-tocopherol have better chemo-preventive effects. She hopes that her future research is something that is practical to everyday lifestyle and will make an impact of the way we live our lives. She would love to play a role in industry or academia, teaching a new generation.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Avinash Kumar
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Kumar was extremely delighted and proud upon receiving this award. He was humbled that his research has been acknowledged and receiving this award would certainly provide him recognition in the Society of Toxicology and further motivate him to progress his career in the field of toxicology to become an independent scientist. He developed interest in the field of liver pathobiology uopn graduation and has been doing research in this area. He wants to progress his career in the field of hepatotoxicology to become an independent scientist and provide mentoring afterwards.

Dr. Kumar's specific research for which this award is based relates to studying the effect of environmental toxicant vinyl chloride  (VC) exposure in the context of underlying liver disease. Vinyl chloride monomer is a gaseous organochloride which after polymerization forms the plastic, polyvinyl chloride (PVC). VC monomer at high concentration causes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its carcinogenic properties were mainly mitigated by lowering the daily exposure limits by OSHA. However, they have recently shown that sub OSHA exposure levels of VC can also exacerbate liver injury caused by high fat diet (HFD). A critical concern therefore is the potential for overlap between diets rich in fatty acid and exposure to VC, because both the factors tend to be higher in the areas of lower socioeconomic status. Importantly the mechanism by which lower concentration of VC sensitizes the liver to other stressors (e.g., HFD) is not completely known. Therefore, the goal of the current project is to shed new light on the mechanism by which VC exacerbates high fat diet-induced hepatic injury and tumor formation and also potential mechanisms to alleviate these risks.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Lauren Poole
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

When it was announced that Dr. Poole had won the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award, she was shocked and overwhelmed with gratitude. Knowing how competitive this award is, she could not believe she was selected from such a strong pool of applicants. Dr. Poole feels extremely fortunate to have had amazing mentors throughout her education and through her membership in the Society of Toxicology. She constantly seeks to emulate her mentors by doing the best science she can and sharing her enthusiasm for her work with every trainee she mentors in any capacity. To be recognized for both of these qualities by the Mechanisms Specialty Section is truly an honor. Her ultimate career goal is to have her own research lab at an academic institution and to serve as a PhD mentor to graduate students of her own. This prestigious and generous award from the Society of Toxicology will certainly make her more confident in her upcoming search for a junior faculty position, and will attract enthusiastic students to her research program. 

Dr. Poole is a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. James Luyendyk at Michigan State University. Her research interests seek to understand how blood clotting proteins contribute to the progression of chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease affects millions of Americans each year, and can develop as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants, consumption of a high-fat diet or excessive alcohol, or viral or autoimmune hepatitis. The end stage of chronic liver disease, liver fibrosis, is characterized by excessive accumulation of collagen, or scar tissue, in the liver which ultimately prevents normal liver function. One specific liver cell type, the hepatic stellate cell, is the primary producer of this scar tissue in the injured liver. The research presented in her 2020 SOT Annual Meeting abstract identified that a receptor expressed by hepatic stellate cells, protease-activated receptor-1, plays an important role in the progression of hepatic fibrosis. Protease-activated receptor-1 is a receptor for certain clotting proteins, such as thrombin. These findings were made possible by the development of a new mouse in which protease-activated receptor-1 is deleted only in hepatic stellate cells, and not other liver cell types. They found that when stellate cell protease-activated receptor-1 was deleted, mice developed significantly less liver fibrosis in response to chronic chemical-induced liver injury. This research provides an important capstone to decades of scientific research investigating the role of the blood clotting cascade in liver disease and identifies a novel druggable target for liver disease treatment.  

Dr. Poole's primary career goal is to become an independent investigator at an academic institution. It is extremely important to her to continue her research program focusing on the connections between exposure to toxicants, activation of the blood clotting cascade, and tissue injury and to share her passion and enthusiasm for this work with students. She strives to continue to grow her involvement in the Society of Toxicology, particularly by acting as a mentor to new students, who are the future of our discipline. 

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MA
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Mr. Sarkar was thrilled to receive the award. This award meant a little more than all the other awards he has received because it not only valued his work on mechanistic toxicology but also recognized his contribution in educating and helping graduate and undergraduate students. 

Mr. Sarkar's research revolves around the role of environmental factors in neurodegeneration and how they interact with genetic factors. His goal is to have an independent lab focusing on gene-environment interaction in Parkinson's disease. Currently, he is working on developing a multiplex model which can be used to study the interactions in a high-throughput manner using alternative models like Drosophila. 

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew Dodson
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Dr. Dodson was very surprised and excited to learn that he was a finalist for the Gabriel L Plaa Education award. Dr. Plaa was a well known and respected member of the toxicology field for many years, so Dr. Dodson considers placing for an award in his name a great honor. Receipt of this award will help him in pursuing his goal of becoming an assistant professor, and hopefully achieving the same level of mentorship and academic pedigree that Dr. Plaa did in his time as part of the SOT.

The research for which Dr. Dodson won this award is centered upon determining the mechanisms that underly arsenic promotion of type II diabetes. While millions of people worldwide are exposed to unsafe levels of arsenic, resulting in an enhanced risk of numerous diseases, there are still a great deal of questions regarding the mechanisms that actually drive arsenic pathogenesis. For his studies, he has found that arsenic inhibits the autophagy lysosome pathway via altering global protein O-GlcNAcylation, resulting in the prolonged activation of the Nrf2 signaling cascade. Importantly, Nrf2 regulates a number of downstream transcriptional responses, thus determining what downstream signaling pathways are affected by chronic arsenic induction of Nrf2 will provide a great deal of insight that can be used to generate better therapies to treat arsenic exposed populations. The core of this work was recently used as preliminary data for Dr. Dodson's K99/R00 submission, which coupled with receipt of this award, would be a significant step towards his goal of becoming an independent academic researcher a top tier university.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Aseel Eid
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Florida International University

Dr. Eid was honored to receive this award, which she feels underscores the importance of her research. Dr. Eid's future goal is to be an independent academic investigator. Her research focuses on different pesticides and how they may contribute to diseases such as Alzheimer's. In the abstract which she presented, she was investigating the role of DDT on specialized cells in the brain that promote inflammation. The award will aid her research in elucidating and understanding the mechanisms by which DDT is contributing to increasing neuroinflammation in microglia. This award also aids her career development as an academic researcher in the field of neurotoxicology. The work presented in this abstract present a new novel role of DDT and is important in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of this pesticide in neurotoxicology. The work presented in her abstract considered the mechanistic role that of known pesticide, DDT on primary microglia. From these data, DDT is able to directly activate microglia and increase neuroinflammatory factors. This presents a potential new adverse effect of this pesticide.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Asmita Pant
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Laura Armstrong
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Dr. Armstrong feels extremely privileged to be have been considered for the award and asked to interview for the award, and even more privileged to have received the award recognizing her current contributions and future goals of being a mentor and educator in the field of toxicology, especially by receiving an award in the recognition of Gabriel L. Plaa.

Her current research focuses on the prevalent disease-state of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with focus on the inflammatory response. With her studies she hopes to contribute to a field of pharmacological development to understand the role of the nuclear receptor Farnesoid X receptor in the disease pathology, this is a receptor that many pharmaceutical companies are currently utilizing as a drug target within the drug pipeline. Her research for this conference specifically focused on discerning the role of this nuclear receptor, FXR in the hepatic acute response -- an initial response to an inflammatory stimuli. Her future goals are to understand mechanistic pathways of disease pathologies related to obesity, and study environmental toxicants or obesogen effect either contributing or worsening these disease pathways.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew Dodson
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Dr. Dodson was very excited to learn he was a finalist for the Gabriel L Plaa award this year. Dr. Plaa played an important role in the Society of Toxicology, as well as in mentoring future generations of toxicologists. This award is another key step towards his eventual goal of attaining an independent academic position. It is his hope that some day he can play a role similar to Dr. Plaa and make important contributions in the field of toxicology and mentor his own generation of future scientists.

His work centers on the role of arsenic in the progression of disease, specifically type II diabetes and cancer. The work for which he won this award centered on determining the mechanism by which arsenic blocks the autophagy pathway, which is a critical pathway for recycling damaged cellular components for re-use in the cell. His future goals include expanding on this work to determine how arsenic effects on autophagy contribute to the metabolic reprogramming that occurs during diabetes. He hopes that this work will also serve as the foundation for a K99 award, which he plans to submit this summer, with the eventual goal of attaining an assistant professorship in the future.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Jessica Hartman
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Duke University

Dr. Hartman was delighted and honored to be selected as a recipient of the Gabriel Plaa Award through the Mechanisms Specialty Section at this year's SOT Annual Meeting. She feels that it is humbling to consider the legacy of Dr. Plaa's contributions to mechanistic toxicology in haloalkane-induced hepatotoxicity and, equally impressive, his visionary dedication to the future of the field through mentoring trainees. In her future career, she plans to continue in academic research and hopes to make her own contributions to mechanistic toxicology through a better understanding of how differences in metabolism drive individual exposure risk. She has already had the pleasure of serving as a mentor to many undergraduate students and have thoroughly enjoyed helping them grow in their scientific research. She eagerly looks forward to serving as a mentor to the next generation of mechanistic toxicologists in her own lab. This award will help her to achieve that goal, and she is very grateful to have been selected.

Her research focuses on Precision Toxicology: the concept that inter-individual differences in metabolism can drive individualized exposure risk. This broad interest has so far given rise to two major projects, both of which are carried out in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. First, her research for which this award was given focuses on how location of the human metabolic enzyme CYP2E1 in different parts of the cell, mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum, can drive differences in toxicity. Because there is large inter-individual variability in how much CYP2E1 goes to each location, this may change how individuals respond to a chemical metabolized by CYP2E1 (including acetaminophen and ethanol). To study this, she has expressed human CYP2E1 targeted specifically to each location in C. elegans (which lack basal expression of the enzyme) and showed that it is active and sensitizes the animals to acetaminophen toxicity. Her second project examines how differences in dietary intake and exercise drive changes to energy metabolism that sensitize or protect from environmental exposures. Overall, both projects aim to link metabolism differences with sensitivity to toxicants. After finishing her postdoctoral fellowship, she hopes to continue this line of research in an academic faculty position while mentoring students and other trainees.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Joseph Cichocki
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Dr. Cichocki is honored to be a finalist for the Plaa award. This is one of the most highly-regarded awards that are offered to postdoc members of SOT. Being a finalist for this award has made him realize that the work that he is doing is recognized as being important for the field of Mechanistic Toxicology. He will definitely apply his knowledge in mechanistic toxicology as he pursues a career in the Pharmaceutical Industry. As he begins the next step in his career, he will be handing off some of this research to undergraduate and graduate students in the lab and will provide them guidance during their research so that they can continue to study the interaction between diet, disease, and genetics on chemical metabolism and target organ toxicity. His research is broadly focused on investigating inter-individual variability in susceptibility to chemical-induced toxicity. The project which has lead him to being a finalist for the Plaa award is focused on the effect of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease on tetrachloroethylene disposition, metabolism, and toxicity. His future goals for this project will be to train graduate and undergraduate trainees in the lab so that they will be able to take the project over once he transitions into a career in Pharma. He feels there is always more mechanistic work to be done on a project, and while he has made considerable strides to understanding the contribution of this disease on tetrachloroethylene toxicity, the work is not completely finished. Since he had an excellent career opportunity to join a really exciting company, he had to make the decision to hand of this project to others in the lab. He anticipates that they will be able to continue to investigate molecular mechanisms and the contribution of genetics, disease, and diet to inter-individual variability in tetrachloroethylene toxicity.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew Dodson
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Dr. Dodson was very pleased to find out that he was a finalist for the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for this year’s annual Society of Toxicology meeting. He is a second year postdoctoral researcher new to the toxicology field, and this is his first time attending the Society of Toxicology meeting, so being nominated for this award is a great honor. His goal is to become the head of his own research laboratory at an academic institution, where he will mentor students and postdocs, receiving an award named after someone who made such significant contributions towards the education and mentoring of future toxicologists is another big step towards achieving this goal. Receiving this award, and having the opportunity to present research at the SOT conference will significantly further his training, and help ensure that he makes significant contributions to the toxicology field. His current research project focuses on the impact of chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic on health and disease. Specifically, he is investigating the mechanisms by which arsenic inhibits the autophagy-lysosome pathway resulting in prolonged activation of the key antioxidant transcription factor NRF2. He is also interested in how arsenic and prolonged NRF2 activation affect long-term mitochondrial structure and function to contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome. The goal of his research is to better understand specific targets affected by chronic arsenic exposure, as well as the mechanisms that contribute to the different pathologies associated with exposure to environmental toxicants. By better understanding how arsenic affects cellular function, we can begin to create more targeted therapies for the treatment of arsenic and other toxic metal-associated diseases. The research that he presented at this year’s meeting that was part of the consideration for an award focuses on the impact of arsenic on the mitochondrial network, and how NRF2 may regulate these changes.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Gregory Smith
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina

Dr. Smith was beyond excited! The Gabriel L. Plaa award is the most important award that he has received thus far in his career. Additionally, it has validated a switch that he made from more descriptive to mechanism-heavy studies. It has also emphasized his desire to continue to mentor new trainees in toxicology. It will undoubtedly boost his motivation to keep on the career path that he has been clearing for himself. His present and future work has been aimed at generating useful data that further our understanding of the mechanisms of environmentally-related disease. The research for which he won the Gabriel Plaa award investigated the role of a specific drug transport protein in the process of liver regeneration following injury using a knockout mouse model. Although the work did not rely on a specific toxicant, it has implications in our understanding of how the liver recovers from injury of all types. He is developing a research career that will continue to investigate the mechanisms of adverse health effects of chemicals, especially air pollutants. In the future he plans to investigate mechanisms of susceptibility to ozone and asthma.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Sridhar Jaligama
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Dr. Jaligama's research is focused on understanding the mechanism of pulmonary immunosuppression during early-life exposure to radical containing ultrafine particulate matter (PM) and how such exposure during early stages of life would affect the infant pulmonary host response to lower respiratory tract infections such as influenza virus. His research findings reported the role of regulatory T cells and IL10 in mediating the immunosuppressive effects of PM and exacerbation of influenza disease severity. He and his colleagues observed a significant increase in regulatory T cells and IL10 in PM exposed mice. Specific depletion of Tregs in PM-exposed mice enhanced protection against influenza virus. Further, IL10 deficiency protected the mice by decreasing the morbidity and pulmonary viral load. Together, these findings demonstrated the role of Tregs and IL10 in mediating PM-induced exacerbation of morbidity and mortality associated with acute influenza infection. These finding were based on our earlier observations of pulmonary immunosuppression in neonatal mice after acute inhalation exposure to PM. A number of epidemiological studies indicate relation between exposure to elevated levels of PM and an increased rate of hospitalization of children with adverse pulmonary events. The research outcomes from my studies would provide valuable insights into understanding the underlying mechanism of these PM-induced adverse pulmonary events. Also, these studies would contribute to general understanding of infant immune responses to such similar PM. It is his belief that a deeper understanding of the mechanism of PM-induced adverse events is critical to protecting susceptible infant populations. He hopes his studies will provide important insights that are valuable for understanding the public health risks of exposure to PM and aid in developing therapeutic interventions for PM-induced respiratory illnesses.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Nicole Olgun
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: CDC/NIOSH

Dr. Olgun's research has always focused on preterm birth, and various methods of prevention. She has worked with cells, pregnant mice, and human placental explants to study inflammation in pregnancy and cytokine expression and production. Upon becoming a post doc at NIOSH, she joined a lab that focuses on metal toxicity and free radicals. The abstract for which she won an award this year, looked at the toxicity that exists between sintered and unsintered indium tin oxide, and how these particles are cause damage to cells. Workers that are exposed to indium tin oxide in the occupational setting experience pulmonary problems, so it is important that these workers be properly protected.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Karilyn Sant
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD, MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Dr. Sant is a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Alicia Timme-Laragy's laboratory at the University of Massachusetts. The lab uses a zebrafish model to better understand the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds on pancreatic organogenesis, and seeks to identify mechanisms by which these developmental exposures may lead to metabolic dysfunction throughout the lifecourse. Her current work used two transgenic zebrafish models to visualize dysmorphogenesis of the pancreas following exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), characterized changes in the gene expression of pancreas hormones at several developmental time points, and identified perturbations of embryonic redox state following exposure.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Eric Beier
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Eric Beier is a postdoctoral fellow at Rutgers University and received the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for his work entitled, "Farnesiod x Receptor enhances the neuroinflammatory response to MPTP." His work focused on the study pathways that mediate neuroinflammation in the dopaminergic centers of the brain that contribute to Parkinson's Disease. He would like to connect different systems of study - brain, bone - and investigate how the interplay between these areas contribute to complex diseases on which our knowledge is limited. He hopes his preclinical research will provide new therapeutic targets that may help to lessen the neuroinflammation that contributes to Parkinson's Disease, a disease that currently has limited treatment options and has a large environmental component to its etiology.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Anna Kopec
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Anna Kopec is a postdoctoral fellow at Michigan State University and received the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for her work entitled, "Role of fibrin(ogen) in hepatocyte proliferation after acetaminophen overdose." Her research focuses on understanding the role of fibrinogen in liver repair and regeneration following acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose. Liver toxicity after an overdose of this common pain medication is the number one cause of drug-induced liver damage in the United States. In a small fraction of patients, the acute toxicity is irreversible leading to permanent liver damage which requires a liver transplant. Given the limited number of available donor livers, understanding the mechanisms of liver repair and liver regeneration is crucial to help to better allocate the organs to the patients where liver regeneration is not possible. She believes that the number one role in advancing the science of toxicology in the 21st century should be the education of the non-scientific audience. Lack of proper information portrayed by the media mostly instills fear about environmental contamination in food and water, having detrimental effect on people's lives. Educating people and introducing the concept of "dose making the poison" should be the priority of toxicologists.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Shaun McCullough
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Shaun McCullough is a postdoctoral fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency and received the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for his work entitled, "Exposure to Ozone Prior to Acrolein Primes Markers of Oxidative, but not Pro-inflammatory, Stress in a GSTM1-dependent Manner." His work focused on the mechanisms underlying the response of the airway to air pollutant exposure. This work involved characterizing the mechanistic response to both sing and multi-pollutant exposures in vitro and a clinical study examining the physiological effects of sequential pollutant exposure. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the effects of and susceptibility to toxicant exposure is critical to protecting susceptible populations and reducing the health impacts of toxicant exposure. The continual advancement of mechanistic models will generate information that can be used to develop better models for predictive toxicology. Ultimately, the development of these models will improve the accuracy of toxicology testing while reducing the need for controlled human and animal exposure studies. Further, by bettering our understanding of how toxicants exert their effects on individuals we can ultimately practice toxicology more efficiently, protect susceptible populations, and develop strategies to ameliorate the effects of toxicant exposure.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Jaime Mirowsky
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina

Jaime Mirowsky is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of North Carolina and received the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for her work entitled, "Expression of proinflammatory and oxidative stress mediators induced by nitrogen dioxide and ozone in primary human bronchial epithelial cells." Her research compared the toxic response of two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, which had previously been thought to elicit a harmful respiratory response in the same manner. Her work demonstrated suggestive evidence that these pollutants do not cause a harmful response in the same manner, opening up the door for future work on the mechanisms underlying these responses. Her research provides an interesting stepping stone for creating a safer and healthier world by challenging a long-established hypothesis about the toxic effects of nitrogen dioxide. Nitrogen dioxide is a toxicant found in the ambient air but also in high concentrations indoors and in occupational settings. It has previously been compared to ozone, a very well studied toxicant, and thought to elicit toxic responses via the same mechanism.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: John Clarke
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

John Clarke is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Arizona and received the Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award for his work entitled, “Synergistic Interaction between Genetics and Disease on Pravastatin Disposition.” Adverse drug reactions are a major challenge in the management of medications in the clinic. Millions of people worldwide take the cholesterol lowering drugs known as statins. Pravastatin is one widely prescribed statin that is associated with a dose-dependent adverse drug reaction known as myopathy. Myopathy is known to contribute to cessation of therapy or may require additional visits to the clinic for dose adjustment and/or a change in statin prescription. Understanding the factors that contribute to the occurrence of these adverse drug reactions will help minimize the occurrence of these and other reactions. An increasingly prevalent liver disease known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been shown to slow the clearance of certain drugs from the body. This has major implications for drugs that have either a narrow therapeutic window or have dose-dependent adverse drug reactions. In the context of precision medicine, our data indicate that clinicians should be cognizant of the presence of underlying liver disease (i.e. NASH) when prescribing certain drugs. By accounting for this variable some of the adverse drug reactions that occur on a regular basis may be avoided. This will increase the safety of drug therapies and, in the case of statins, avoid costly medication changes and encourage more people to maintain their therapy rather than stop due to the uncomfortable side effect of myopathy. Collectively, this research illuminates an additional factor in inter-individual variability for drug response that previously has not been appreciated and accepted as a risk factor and provides the foundation for many future clinical studies in this important and emerging area.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Tetyana Kobets
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MD, MSPH
Institution/Affiliation: Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

Tetyana Kobets is a researcher with the Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research and received the Gabriel L. PLaa Education Award for her work entitled, “Epigenetic Alterations in the Livers of Fisher 344 Rats Exposed to Furan.” The main focus of the recognized by this award study was to investigate the role of epigenetic alterations in the mechanisms of furan hepatotoxicity and carcinogenicity. The results of the study showed that exposure of male rats to furan caused dose-and time-dependent epigenetic changes in their livers. These findings significantly contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of furan carcinogenesis and could be helpful for the future development of prevention strategies for early hepatic adverse effects associated with the furan exposure. Advanced understanding of mechanisms involved in liver carcinogenesis, and the role of environmental and lifestyle agents in the development of liver cancer will be helpful in determination and analysis of molecular targets of potential chemopreventive agents and in uncovering of molecular biomarkers of liver injury. This will help to develop a better strategies for carcinogens risk assessment, provide us with more data needed to decrease the incidence rates of liver cancer as it will result in the development of better ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat this disease.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Kathryn Page
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: UC Berkeley

Kathryn Page is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of California, Berkeley and received the Gabriel L. PLaa Education Award for her work entitled, “Toxic Milk Leads to the “Mask” Phenotype in Hephaestin Knockout Mice.” Dr. Page feels especially delighted to be presented with the Plaa Award, due to the importance of the liver in iron homeostasis and metabolism, co-ordinating well with the seminal work by Dr Plaa on hepatotoxic mechanisms. Dr. Page's work focused on the mechanism behind iron deficiency hair-loss in mice. This work involves the hephaestin knockout mouse (lacking a copper-iron ferroxidase important for intestinal iron transport), which grows hair normally post birth, but cycles through a period of hair-loss at approximately 14 days, followed by regrowth around 40 days. The mechanism appears to be due to iron deficiency, and is passed on through the mother's milk, rather than by genotype. Continuation of her research will help to outline the mechanism behind iron deficiency, but also to highlight the link between human iron deficiency and hair-loss. She hopes to use this underlying mechanism to find drug targets, and develop therapeutics to reverse the toxic effects of iron dis-homeostasis. She feels her work is of interest to the general public, and hopes to highlight the toxicological community and the impact made on everyday life by working in this field.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: John Clarke
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona
John Clarke is a postdoctoral fellow of the University of Arizona who received the Molecular Biology Student Award for his work entitled, “Impaired Glycosylation and Membrane Localization of Uptake and Efflux Transporters in Human Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.” Dr. Clarke’s research examined nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is a liver disease that is increasingly prevalent in the world. This disease can change the expression and function of proteins involved in the metabolism and movement of xenobiotics, including environmental toxins, drugs, and dietary constituents. Dr. Clarke and his colleagues showed that several uptake transporters and several efflux transporters altered expression and localization in human livers with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Also, they found that these changes in localization were caused by impaired N-linked glycosylation of proteins (including transporters) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. These data provide mechanistic information into how xenobiotics have altered disposition in fatty liver disease. Dr. Clarke hopes to better understand the toxicological mechanisms that influence the transition from steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and the transition from steatohepatitis to hepatocellular carcinoma. These diseases are a burden to patients and the health care system. By understanding how environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases, he can help advance of toxicology research in the 21st century.

Gabriel L. Plaa Education Award Fund

Recipient: Tao Chen
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MD, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
Tao Chen, of Penn State University, for his abstract, “Proteasomal Interaction Regulates the Activity of the Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor.” His research project was to explore the activation mechanism of the human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR), a nuclear receptor that plays significant and diverse roles regulating the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous substances, as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and modulator of cell cycle/death pathways. Using various cell-based assays, his research demonstrated a novel proteosomal pathway involved in hCAR regulation and activation. Xenobiotic exposure from various sources is a prominent and increasing public health concern, and nuclear receptors play pivotal roles in mediating biological responses to these exposures, through their abilities to reprogram gene transcriptional regulation. His research further delineates mechanistic pathways through which these responses are modulated. Going forward, he plans to participate actively in the Society of Toxicology. His goal is to participate as a scientific researcher and to help facilitate a broader understanding of the biological and toxicological impact of chemical exposures as mediated through the xenobiotic receptor network. The functional consequences of these chemical-receptor interactions include the modulation of xenobiotic metabolism, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions and influences on lipid and energy homeostasis.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prathyusha Bagam
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Southern University A&M College

Ms. Bagam was really excited and grateful when she learned that she was the recipient of this award. It is a prestigious honor which will benefit her tremendously in her scientific pursuit. Her first reaction was to call up her mentor- Dr. Sanjay Batra- to thank him for all his support and guidance during these years. Being in the final stages of her graduate studies, attending the national meeting of Society of Toxicology is of great significance to her research; and being selected for the prestigious Dr. Harihara Mehendale award will help in introducing and sharing her research to a wider audience. Ms. Bagam feels it will be a great opportunity to interact with renowned scientists working in the field of toxicology and she will benefit hugely from the discussions, feedback, and new ideas. Furthermore, she will be able to incorporate these new ideas while finalizing her upcoming original research articles. Recognition from this award will further motivate Ms. Bagam to pursue with high standard of excellence in research and achieve her career goals.

Ms. Bagam works in the field of Pulmonary Immunotoxicity with focus on Inhalation Toxicology. She is interested in determining the effect of cigarette smoke (active and passive smoking) on the mechanism(s) associated with protein homeostasis. To be more specific, her project's focus is to determine the molecular mechanisms associated with the regulation of autophagy mechanism during cigarette smoke exposure using secondhand smoke exposed murine model and in vitro. Autophagy plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis under stress conditions and her goal is to unravel the critical players of this phenomenon which could be targeted for the development of better therapeutic strategies for pulmonary disorders resulting from smoke exposure. Since not much is known about the pathophysiology of COPD, this could be an interesting pursuit as it might provide answers to the regulators of inflammatory responses as well during exposure to cigarette smoke. The work which Ms. Bagam will be presenting at the SOT Annual Meeting focuses on determining the role of FOXO transcription factors in regulating cigarette smoke induced autophagy in human alveolar epithelial cells. Although the role of FOXO transcription factors in regulating autophagy has been documented earlier, their role and the detailed molecular mechanism during cigarette smoke exposure remains to be fully explored. In this regard, her results demonstrate dysregulated expression of FOXO1 and FOXO3 in response to cigarette smoke challenge. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene knockdown and gene over expression techniques she has nailed down the molecular mechanism which demonstrates essential role of FOXO1 transcription factor in regulating the expression of key autophagy proteins during cigarette smoke exposure. Her results are exciting as they provide a snapshot of the molecular events that are triggered on smoke exposure and augment the autophagic flux in cigarette smoke challenged cells.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Archit Rastogi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BTech
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Mr. Rastogi was thrilled to receive the award! The award will enable him to travel to the SOT Meeting, which will be invaluable at this juncture in his career.

Mr. Rastogi's doctoral thesis focuses on discerning how fetal exposures to the environmental toxicants impact health later in life. He won this award for work demonstrating how specific transcription factors are abnormally expressed in the pancreas upon toxicant exposure. This misimpression results in aberrant pancreas structure, which could predispose individuals to diabetes later in life.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dharmin Rokad
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Mr. Rokad was pleased, and felt extremely honored and humbled to learn that he was receiving this award. It will help him in realizing his goals as a young researcher in the field, and will support him at various levels in his journey as a researcher.

Mr. Rokad is currently working on Manganese toxicity with regards to neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease. He is learning and investigating how Manganese over-exposure leads to neurodegeneration and disease condition. His Ph.D. research focuses on divalent manganese (Mn) interactions with α-Synuclein protein and neurodegeneration. His current project focuses on investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in manganese-induced misfolded α-Synuclein release through exosomes and its relevance to synucleopathies. Occupational and environmental exposure through inhalation and ingestion leads to elevated doses of Mn which can lead to a neurological condition such as Parkinson’s disease and other neurological diseases. Mr. Rokad is currently evaluating the role of manganese in modulating endosomal protein trafficking mechanisms to promote the α-synuclein exosomal release and Parkinson's Disease pathogenesis. Based on these findings, he is planning to identify novel therapeutic targets for Parkinson's Disease.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sireesha Manne
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BVSc
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Ms. Manne was very glad to receive this award. This is a great opportunity to continue the research and this award will help her to pursue her passion in the toxicology field.

Her current work focuses on developing a diagnostic biomarker for manganese neurotoxicity and to other neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson's and prion diseases. In the current study, she identified exosome-based biomarkers such as aggregated alpha-synuclein and some small RNA changes as potential biomarker value for manganese neurotoxicity. They developed a Real-Time quaking-induced conversion assay to detect the aggregated alpha-synuclein protein in a group of welder's population using serum exosomes.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sharavan Ramachandran
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Mr. Ramachandran was really overwhelmed and excited to receive this award. It is really a great honor and an acknowledgement for a graduate student like himself to receive this award. It has provided his research a recognition in the global research platform. Moreover, it will foster him to perform qualitative research in the future.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal and malignant disease in the United States with a 5 year survival rate of lower than 5%. In addition, gemcitabine which is currently prescribed for the treatment of pancreatic cancer has become ineffective due to development of gemcitabine resistance by cancer cells. Hence there is a need to design novel therapeutic agents to combat the challenges in pancreatic cancer treatment. Herein their project is focused on deciphering the anti-cancer effects of pimavanserin in pancreatic cancer.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nehal Gupta
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: M. Pharm
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

She was very excited and enthusiastic after receiving Dr. Harihara Mehendale Graduate Student Best Abstract Award. She would like to thank SOT and ASIO for selecting her for this award. This award offers a tremendous financial support for her to attend the SOT Annual Meeting in 2018. It is an excellent opportunity to meet scientists across the globe and share her work with them, which provided novel insights to her work. Also, Recognition by award committee has boosted her morale to do better work.

Her doctoral dissertation research is focused on breast cancer which affects more than 200,000 women annually in the United States, accounting for 26% of all incident cancers among women. The primary focus of her research study is based on repurposing of an anti-protozoal, anti-malarial drug, atovaquone for the management of breast cancer. They have evaluated the anti-cancer effects of atovaquone in various breast cancer cell lines. Their results demonstrate that oral administration of atovaquone suppressed the growth of CI66 and 4T1 tumors by 70% and 60% respectively. So far, they have observed that atovaquone is efficacious in treating primary and resistant breast tumors. For future studies, they are planning to test atovaquone for its anti-metastatic potential in treating metastasis of breast cancer. Also, they will look for immune modulation by atovaquone in mice having breast cancer.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

He was pleasantly surprised on receiving this award. Receiving the ASIO award as a graduate student validated the importance of his research. It is also an important stepping-stone in realizing his career goal to join academia in the field of toxicology.

He has been fascinated with toxicology research and identifying novel targets for drug discovery. His current focus of work is to elucidate the role of microglial ion channels in neuroinflammation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models. Recently, he found that one particular channel is highly upregulated in PD animal models as well as postmortem PD brains. He has further showed that in neurotoxin based-animal models of PD, as well as in transgenic mouse models of PD, and in primary cultures, blocking this channel has an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect. He has utilized both genetic knockdown and PAP-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Kv1.3 in clinical trial, to show the specificity of the anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect. He has further identified the key transcriptional regulators and post-translational modifiers of this channel. He has shown that Fyn, a src family kinase directly binds to Kv1.3 modulating its activity. Further, a pharmacological inhibitor, saracatinib, reduces the expression of Kv1.3. The translational potential of this study is significant given that microglial activation has been linked to multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. 

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Diptadip Dattaroy
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Hanumantha Rao Madala
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
It was quite a surprising announcement in the ASIO ongoing meeting. He had submitted his abstract and thought someone was awarded and had just forgotten everything but when his name was announced, he was so shocked and felt so proud of his self and the research of his lab. It gave him a lot of confidence and will help him to pursue his dream in research with same hard work and efforts in future as well. Chemo drugs in the market kill everything non-selectively and the compound, KSS72, that we designed in our lab works with selectivity. It kills the cancer cells with around 20 times more selectivity. It's an analog of FDA approved, anti-hypertensive drug, ethacrynic acid. It permeates the brain and showed anticancer efficacy in various mouse models.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Bharat Bhushan
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center
Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the foremost cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the US. Despite decades of research, current treatment options after APAP-overdose are extremely limited. Liver injury after APAP-overdose is subsequently followed by compensatory liver regeneration, which promotes recovery. Preventing liver injury and stimulating liver regeneration are potential strategies to develop novel therapies for APAP-induced ALF. However, mechanisms of APAP-induced liver toxicity or subsequent liver regeneration are not completely understood.The major focus of Dr. Bhushan's research work is to study these mechanisms. In the work that will be presented at the 2016 SOT annual meeting, we investigated role of EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) signaling in APAP-induced ALF. Role of EGFR signaling in APAP-induced liver toxicity and subsequent liver regeneration is completely unknown. In this extremely novel work, we demonstrated that EGFR signaling plays a dual role in APAP overdose and is involved in both initiation of APAP-induced liver injury (via mitochondrial damage) and in stimulating subsequent liver regeneration (via controlling cell cycle). Our work revealed an extremely novel and intriguing mechanisms about how a cell membrane receptor, EGFR, can translocate to mitochondria and cause both cell death or cell proliferation signaling in hepatocytes, in a time dependent manner, during APAP-induced ALF.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Gopi Gadupudi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Iowa
Mr. Gadupudi's research works involves understanding the toxicity of food-borne chemicals such as PCB126. Specifically, this work involves characterizing the dose and time dependent toxicity of PCB126 in causing metabolic disorders such as diabetes, fatty liver and metabolic syndrome. Moving forward, we would like to understand the mechanisms involved in the PCB or POP induced metabolic disruption. Understanding these mechanisms would definitely aid in identifying adverse effects on human health and risk characterization.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alok Ranjan
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Mr. Ranjan started his project on brain cancer with a very rational approach. Glioblastoma (Brain cancer) is one of the most malignant and incurable brain cancers. The median survival rate of glioblastoma patients is only 12%. Although, there are several treatment options available but glioblastoma still claims thousands of lives each year. Existing obstacles with current treatment options are (a) Recurrence of tumor within six months after surgical removal (b) Development of resistance to the current chemotherapeutic options available and (c) Inability of the drugs to cross the blood brain barrier. Most of the antipsychotic drugs cross blood brain barrier and reach the brain to provide a relief to the patients with psychotic disorder. This gave us the rationale to test toxic effect of the antipsychotic drugs against glioblastoma. We examined several antipsychotic drugs for their toxic effects against glioblastoma and discovered that penfluridol had significant toxicity against brain cancer cells. His studies also established anti-metastatic potential of penfluridol in several brain metastasis of breast cancer (Alok Ranjan, Parul Gupta and Sanjay Srivastava “Penfluridol: An antipsychotic agent suppresses metastatic tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer by inhibiting integrin signaling axis” Cancer Research 2015). We also observed that chronic treatment of mice with penfluridol was not associated with any toxicity or behavioral side effect. Since penfluridol is an FDA approved drug, the pharmacology, formulation and potential toxicities are already known. Our preclinical studies can fasten the clinical trial and review by Food and Drug Administration. This could bring relief to the patients with highly lethal and resistant brain tumor He has short term and long term goals. His goals are listed below. Short term goals: 1. He wants to have in depth knowledge of cell signaling pathways involved in glioblastoma progression, in vivo models and different skills useful in the research related to glioblastoma. 2. Publish research work in high impact factor journals. Long term goal: 1.After completing his doctoral studies, he wants to establish myself as an independent cancer researcher especially in brain tumor. 2.He wants to open a cancer center where poor or needy people suffering from cancer, who cannot afford expensive bills can get counseling and care at no cost/very low cost.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amruta Manke
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: West Virginia University
Amruta Manke is a graduate student at West Virginia University and she received the Harihara Mehendale Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for her work entitled, "Role of Stem-like Cells in Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrosis." Recent studies have shown that pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT), one of the most widely used nanomaterials in industry, results in rapid and progressive interstitial lung fibrosis in animals without causing persistent lung inflammation, which is normally associated with other known fibrogenic agents. This unusual fibrogenic effect of CNT raises important health issues since the exposure could result in deadly and incurable lung fibrosis. Through her research project which is aimed at investigating the mechanisms for nanomaterial-induced lung toxicity, her lab members hope to identify key nanoparticle characteristics and a set of in vitro screening assays for evaluation of the potential fibrogenicity of carbon nanomaterials (CNTs) in vivo. This study is important since it will enable identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in associated with CNT induced fibrogenesis which may benefit in detection of novel biomarkers and drug targets. Moreover, the objectives laid out in this study are crucial because of the impact they will have in the area of nano-particle induced pulmonary toxicity as well as in understanding the pathogenesis of CNT induced interstitial fibrosis.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prajakta Shimpi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: M.Pharm
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island
Prajakta Shimpi is a graduate student is a graduate student at the University of Rhode Island and received the Harihara Mehendale Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for her work entitled, "Early Epigenetic Modulation of Nrf2 and Lipogenic Genes by PNPP Exposure of Bisphenol A is Associated with Hepatic Steatosis in Female Mice." The work she is presenting this year focuses on plastic bottle component Bisphenol A. She treats pregnant mice with this compound and studies the effect on the pups. These pups develop fatty liver, which could be a risk factor severe liver condition. She is working on detecting the detailed molecular studies on how exactly bisphenol A affects liver pathways. Interestingly, the effects observed in pups also remain persistent in adult animals, indicating the potential danger these environmental chemicals pose to human health. She wants to continue her work on environmental toxicants, and elucidate mechanistic links of how these toxicants affect liver. The liver is an important organ, which performs several crucial functions in the body. Any chemical or disease that affects liver function is imperative to be studied. In continuing her work on environmental chemicals, she would like to study more and newer chemicals that are being used in larger amounts in the manufacturing industry.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Siva Prasad Bitragunta
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Birla Institute of Technology and Science, India
Siva Prasad Bitragunta is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences at Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Hyderabad Campus. The vital aspect of his research inheres in application of metabolomics to establish biomarkers of nanoparticle toxicity. He received the Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award for his work entitled “Physicochemical Characterization and Ecotoxicological Evaluation of TiO2 Nanoparticles in Earthworm Eisenia foetida”. The study revealed size dependent toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticle in earthworm by modified paper contact method of OECD-207 guidelines. It demonstrated the ability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles to induce oxidative stress in sentinel earthworm. It emphasized the need for review of standard guidelines to ascertain ecotoxicity of nanoparticles. Outcomes of the study will definitely assist in designing risk assessment methods to dispel adverse impacts of nanomaterials on environment. He hopes to be a part of the new dimensions of toxicology in 21st Century in assessing toxic effects of nanomaterials on living systems and environment. He aspires to advance the science of toxicology by integrating ‘omics’ approach to envision the toxicity of nanoparticles in environmental indicator species thereby delineating the impact of nanowaste on various compartments of environment.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Shirisha Chittiboyina
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington
Shirisha Chittiboyina is a Graduate Student at the School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington and received the Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award for her work entitled “The Role of the Folate Pathway in Pancreatic Cancer Risk.” Her research showed that one of the risk factors for cancer as shown by recent literature is life style determinants like smoking, alcohol consumption and individuals dietary habits. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer especially has been shown to be associated with altered folate metabolism. Her research looked into the genes that are involved in folate metabolism , polymorphisms in these genes and how they affect the risk of pancreatic cancer. This award helps her move one step further towards her scientific goal to identify new therapeutic tools for pancreatic cancer and other cancers as well.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mansi Krishan
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Cincinnati
Mansi Krishan is a PhD candidate at the University of Cincinnati. She received the Harihara Mehendale Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for her work entitled, “Enhanced Intranasal Delivery of Gemcitabine to the Central Nervous System.” In this study, she and her lab partners used a permeableizer Papaverine to enhance the paracellualr permeability through nasal epithelial tight junctions and delivered significant amount of Gemcitabine to the brain through the nasal route. Receiving this ward will help her pursue her interests in the field of toxicology.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tejas Lahoti
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Pennsylvania State University
Tejas Lahoti is a PhD candidate at Pennsylvania State University and received the Harihara Mehendale Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for his work titled, “Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) Regulates Growth Factor Expression, Proliferation, Protease-dependent Invasion, and Migration in Primary Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.” He would like to pursue a postdoctoral position after completing his PhD with a career goal of working in academia to inspire more students to go into research.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Murli Mishra
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky
Murli Mishra, of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, for his work entitled, “In Silico Methods of Genotoxicity Prediction: Can it be Used Reliably for Prediction of In Vitro/In Vivo Genotoxicity?” His work involves the development of a QSAR model that is able to predict in vivo genotoxicity of compounds. There were a number of models that can predict in vitro genotoxicity, but none of existing model could predict, in vivo genotoxicity. He has joined the PhD program in toxicology at University of Kentucky now and wants to work to increase the reliability of existing computational models, and also would like to work later to develop some computational models of toxicity prediction that are having concordance comparable to existing in vitro and in vivo models of toxicity testing.

Harihara Mehendale Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Ashwini Phadnis
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Ashwini Phadnis, of Michigan State University, for his abstract entitled, “Suppression of Activation and Altered BCL-6 Regulation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in Human Primary B Cells.” The overall objective of his work is to determine the effects of a potent environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on primary human B cells. Monitoring the effects of this toxicant on human B cells has generalized health implications, especially in determining the sensitivity of these cells to toxicants and understanding the mechanism underlying disruption of normal immune function. He identified BCL-6 as a candidate gene that is involved in disruption activation of human B cells. Upon completion of graduate studies, he plans to pursue postdoctoral research in a field wherein he can integrate genetics and toxicology. As we move towards toxicity testing in the 21st century, He would like to work on and be a contributor to screen potential human health hazards in a high-throughput manner by utilizing in vitro cultures of primary human cells.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Thea Golden
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PharmD, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Golden is very grateful to be the recipient of this award. She is excited to present her work at SOT and receive valuable feedback from experts in the field of immunotoxicology. Her research is beginning to focus on environmental causes of in-utero alterations and it is ideal timing to speak with toxicologists.

Recently it has become evident that alterations during fetal development can have lasting effects on offspring health. In Dr. Golden's laboratory, she focuses on intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) leading to development of type 2 diabetes and obesity in the adult. The research she will present at SOT identifies immune populations altered in the pancreas following IUGR and suggests their direct involvement in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Having identified critical windows of susceptibility and populations deleterious to the pancreas, she now is exploring various environmental insults during fetal development that also result in pancreatic inflammation and subsequent development of type 2 diabetes.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alessandro Venosa
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PharmD, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Considering the high quality work presented by trainees every year, receiving such a prestigious award from SOT makes Dr. Venosa feel no less than electrified. It is an honor to be recognized for the quality of his work. In honesty, this award has an extra special meaning because it acknowledges the progress of his postdoctoral training. The positive feedback from leading experts in the field fuels his motivations to move forward in his path to independence and be the best scientist he can be.

His research explores new mechanisms regulating pulmonary fibrogenesis using a model of surfactant protein-C dysfunction (I73T). The main goals of his studies, described in his SOT abstract, are 1) to describe their new transgenic model of surfactant dysfunction; 2) to characterize the role of resident and infiltrating immune cells in the injury; 3) establish the presence of an immune-epithelial cell crosstalk in the pathogenesis of disease. The ultimate goal of this project is to temporally and spatially characterize these cellular subsets, and aid the development of a targeted therapy to delay/reverse the progression of this condition.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Anthony Franchini
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rochester

Dr. Franchini's initial reaction to receiving the HESI Young Investigator award was glee mixed with disbelief. As a recent convert to the field of immunotoxicology, and while he has great respect for the field, he did not expect to be lauded with such an honor. Last year was his first chance to attend an SOT Annual Meeting and he was not disappointed. His greatest takeaway from that meeting was whom he met and conversations sparked during the poster sessions and the effect it had on the direction of his project. Building his professional network is a major priority at this time in his career, and the assemblage of scientists at SOT each year represents the best opportunity to do just that. It is his hope to continue to build on those relationships this year and start new ones. Receiving the award presented the greatest opportunity to better his understanding of the field of immunotoxicology and keep abreast of advancement in the field that will directly influence his work and thinking now and in the near future. The focus of his current project is to better understand how pollutants affect the ability of our immune system and its ability to response to viral infection. Specifically, the focus is on the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) within dendritic cells, a critical cell type that binds viral antigens and are required for initiating adaptive immune responses which ultimately control and clear the infection. His group had previously shown that exposure to chemicals that bind the AHR dampen the immune response, and this was traced back to the AHR's activity within the dendritic cell population. His research has built on this to investigate the exact mechanism by which this occurs. He's found that AHR activation lessens the ability of dendritic cells to attract T cells to them, via a protein called CCL17, a necessary step in presenting these immune cells with antigen and activating them to clear the infection. He also has uncovered evidence that lung dendritic cells less well equipped to pick up viral antigens because AHR activation reduces expression of a receptor called DC-SIGN. Furthermore, his work has expanded to work with human dendritic cells, where he has shown that similar changes derived from the mouse model are also seen in human dendritic cells after AHR activation.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Edmund O'Brien
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: L'Oreal

Edmund O'Brien is a Postdoctoral Fellow with L'Oreal and received the HESI Young Investigator Endowment Award for his work entitled, "Inhalation of the Reactive Aldehyde Acrolein Promotes Antigen Sensitization and Enhances Allergic Responses to Ovalbumin." His work dealt with asthma development and asthma severity following inhalation of acrolein, an aldehyde present in tobacco smoke. This research demonstrated that acrolein modestly enhances asthma development and neutrophilia in the lung. He believes his research, when combined with previous studies from his lab, determined that acrolein exposure can have dramatically different effects on pulmonary inflammation associated with asthma depending on when acrolein exposure takes place during disease development. When applying this research to human exposures, the data suggest that the initial stages of asthma development are more affected by acrolein exposure. By applying this research to human health, limiting acrolein or tobacco smoke exposure during early postnatal development may aid it preventing pulmonary diseases like asthma, thus making a healthier world.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Fenna Sille
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Berkeley

Fenna Sille is a Postdoctoral Scholar at University of California Berkeley and received the HESI Young Investigator Endowment Award for her work entitled, "Arsenic and innate immunity: macrophage function upon arsenic exposure." She and her team hypothesized that arsenic ingestion permanently impacts the development of the immune system and increases the risks of cancer and TB later in life. They focused on the effects of arsenic on macrophages, immune cells known to influence tumor and TB progression and analyzed the secretion of various signaling molecules including cytokines, chemokines and lipids, as well as the capacity to control an M. tuberculosis infection. She says that her long-term research goal is to clarify the immunological mechanisms underlying chronic diseases and global infectious diseases caused by early-life environmental exposures. With her research, she aims to identify potential targets for intervention to reduce the burden of disease in exposed communities. Ultimately, she hopes her research will provide critical insights into desperately needed prevention strategies in order to create a safer and healthier world, right from the start of life.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mili Mandal
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Mili Mandal is a postdoctoral candidate at Rutgers University and she received the Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Travel Award for her work entitled, “Spleen as a Source of Inflammatory Macrophages: Role in Acetaminophen-induced Hepatotoxicity.” Her work involved Acetaminophen (APAP), a widely used over the counter pain-killer and fever reducer. At therapeutic doses, it is considered safe and effective; however, toxic doses leads to hepatotoxicity, which is by far the most common cause of acute liver failure in the US and the UK. Monocytes/macrophages, cells of innate immune system have been shown to play an important role in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the origin of these cells has not been established. Splenic monocytes/macrophages have been shown to accumulate at inflammatory sites following tissue injury. In the present studies, Dr. Mandal and her colleagues analyzed the contribution of splenic monocytes/macrophages to liver inflammation and injury induced by APAP. Her data demonstrate, for the first time, a role of the spleen as a reservoir for proinflammatory monocytes/macrophages in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Moreover, in the absence of these splenic inflammatory monocyte/macrophage populations, liver injury is reduced. These findings are novel and expand our knowledge of monocytes/macrophages function, fate, and influx to liver in acute inflammation during APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, which can have significant therapeutic implications. Her ultimate career goal is to become an independent scientist in the field of immuno-toxicology working in a university environment. Her long-term research interests involve understanding the role of Th17 cells and their interaction with other innate and adaptive immune cells as well as inflammatory mediators in chronic liver inflammation.

Health and Environmental Science Institute Immunotoxicology Young Investigator Student Award Fund

Recipient: David Blake
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Fort Lewis College
David Blake, of Fort Lewis College, for his work entitled, “Sulforaphane Restores Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Cigarette Smoke Resulting in Decreased Cytokine Production.” His research project focused on the inflammatory effects of cigarette smoke on human cells. He characterized a compound, sulforaphane, which is found in broccoli that has anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. He hopes to identify how this compound works at the cellular level. He hopes to go on to graduate school next year with the goal of creating an environmental health program in the Four Corners region by teaching toxicology and immunology to undergraduate students in the program.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Liang Chi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mr. Chi was so excited when he learned he had received the American Association of Chinese in Toxicology SIG Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award. It is a huge honor for him and an important approval for his PhD study. It will encourage him to study more in the future.

Mr. Chi's studies mainly focused on the functional interactions between gut microbiota and arsenic exposure. His study reveals that gut microbiota can modulate arsenic bioavailability and biotransformation which could protect the host against arsenic toxicity. But chronic arsenic exposure can perturb normal gut microbiota and cause community dysbiosis, which will affect host health and disease outcomes. He found that transplanting arsenic-exposed gut microbiota to healthy mice could induce glucose intolerance in mice, which is associated with the disturbed intestinal bile acid signals.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Jun Zhou
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia

Dr. Zhou was very glad to receive this valuable award, which was originally endowed by Dr. Frank Lu and his wife Ms. Jean Lu. It will always remind him in his career path that he should work as a bridge to line-up people of different cultures, ethnic backgrounds and various fields, in order to better serve people, while pursuing his personal research.

He used high-throughput techniques and omics methods to investigate how xenobiotics and nutrients can impact on metabolisms in different aspects. In the future he will focus on high-throughput toxicology. A large number of studies have investigated the impacts of toxins, toxicants and nutrients on human metabolic and endocrine status. However, the modifying effects of various xenobiotics on gut-microbiota dependent metabolisms, as well as associated metabolic and endocrine status are less known. Dietary exposure to major food-borne mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is associated with a wide range of severe health problems in human, including metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis, liver cirrhosis, and dysbiosis etc. But the alterations of gut-microbiota induced by AFB1 has never been well studied. The work to be presented in SOT 2019 would be about gut-microbiota dependent metabolisms in Aflatoxin B1-treated rat model.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Danqi Chen
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Ph.D.
Institution/Affiliation: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

She was very excited to receive this award. Receiving this award means a lot to her: First, it is shown her work is recognized by many people. She made some academic achievement in the field of toxicology. Second, it offers her more opportunity to communicate with other toxicologists in SOT. Third, she can use the stipend to cover her travel expenses for attending SOT.

Formaldehyde is an environmental and occupational chemical carcinogen, which was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as Group 1 carcinogen. Formaldehyde exposure causes human nasopharyngeal cancer and is linked to leukemia. Formation of DNA adducts has been considered a key event in formaldehyde-induced carcinogenesis. However, recent studies demonstrated that the amount of DNA adducts caused by exogenous formaldehyde exposure in rat nasal were only modestly increased compared to the level of adducts formed by endogenous formaldehyde. Moreover, the DNA adducts caused by exogenous formaldehyde were not detectable in bone marrow of animals exposed to formaldehyde. These findings have raised questions about the role of genetic damage in formaldehyde-induced carcinogenesis and prompted the possibility that epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to formaldehyde-mediated carcinogenicity. In her study, she first time demonstrates that formaldehyde readily forms adducts with histones in cells and dramatically decreases lysine acetylation of the cytosolic histones H3 and H4 at the sites critical for histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly. The assembly of histone H3 into chromatin is compromised following formaldehyde exposure, resulting in changes in chromatin accessibility and transcription. Interestingly, a number of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes that are related to head and neck cancer and/or hematological neoplasia are identified as formaldehyde-responsive genes mediated by blocking chromatin assembly. Moreover, inhibition of chromatin assembly led to the enhanced formaldehyde-mediated anchorage-independent growth of cells. Her study reveals impaired chromatin assembly as a potential novel mechanism of formaldehyde-induced carcinogenesis. This would be the first report demonstrating an established carcinogen induces cell transformation through blocking chromatin assembly pathway. Importantly, other electrophilic carcinogens such as acetaldehyde could have similar mechanisms and effects. Her study thus has the potential to shed new light on the molecular basis of chemical carcinogenesis.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Kathy Xue
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia

She is very happy to receive this award. This is a rare opportunity to showcase her PhD research work and will have important impact on her on-going research and future career. Her research works, for which she won the award, focuses on studying toxic effects of naturally occurring foodborne contaminants (mycotoxins), especially for aflatoxins and fumonisins, on animal and human health, as well as their roles in contributing to cancer risks. Co-contamination of aflatoxins and fumonisins has been found world-wide, detectable in many food items, particularly in corn and corn products. Aflatoxins are known cancer causing agents in humans and can cause human liver cancer, while fumonisins are shown to be cancer promoting agents in animal models, and was associated with increased risk of human esophageal cancer.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Xiao Xiao
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

The purpose of Mr. Xiao's research is to determine the role of permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, on development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Permethrin is a structural analog of pyrethrin, a naturally occurring pyrethroid insecticide from Chrysanthemum flower heads, accounting 17% of the world insecticide uses in 2013 and more than 60% of pyrethroids. Human exposure to permethrin is very likely to occur through food chain contamination and direct application to control ectoparasites. Concurrently, the rising rate of obesity and type 2 diabetes cannot be explained fully by considering changes in diet, lifestyle or genetics of individuals, suggesting the need to investigate other factors that may be involved in this disease outbreak. An increasing number of scientific studies have suggested a potential link between insecticide exposure and the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. His research will help to fill the current knowledge gap between insecticide exposure and alteration of glucose and lipid metabolism. The research that helped him win the Jean Lu student award was determination of the role of permethrin and its interaction with dietary fat on development of obesity and diabetes in mice. This will be the first in vivo study determining the role of permethrin and development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. We tested three doses of permethrin, between acceptable daily intake and chronic no observed effect levels, in low-fat fed and high-fat fed mice for 12 weeks. Our results showed that permethrin treatment significantly increased weight gain, fat mass, and insulin resistance in high-fat fed groups, but no significant effect were observed in low-fat fed animals. These results suggest that increased dietary fat may have contributed to effects of permethrin in altered lipid and glucose metabolism. His next goal is to investigate detailed mechanism of how permethrin exposure, interacting with dietary fat, caused weight gain and insulin resistance by using a cell culture model.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Marlene T. Kim
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS Biochemistry
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Marlene T. Kim is a graduate student at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and received the Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award for her work entitled, "From Individual Datasets to Big Data: Developing Mechanism-Driven Predictive Liver Toxicity Models." Compounds that are both biologically and chemically similar are considered likely to have similar toxicity mechanisms/effects. By calculating the biochemical similarity between two compounds based on common in vitro response profiles and chemical features (i.e., toxicophores), the similarity value can be used to determine the potential toxicity. She developed an automated workflow for predicting and modeling animal toxicity using in vitro data and chemical descriptors. The workflow consists of three major stages: 1) Creating a biological and chemical profile. Compound identifiers (e.g., CID or CASRN) are input into an in-house automated profiling tool, which retrieves bioassays [from public big data sources] and generates chemical descriptors, and outputs the biological and chemical profile. 2) Calculating the biological and chemical similarity between each pair of compounds. A Weighted Estimate of Biological Similarity (WEBS) tool was developed to read bioassay responses and calculate the biological similarity between pairs of compounds. Compounds are grouped based on common chemical features (e.g., toxicophores and fragments). Then, the WEBS for each pair of compounds in these chemical groups are calculated. 3) Predicting the toxicity of an unknown compound. The toxicity predictions are based on the average activities (toxicity values) of the nearest neighbor(s), which are similar compounds based on the biochemical similarity found in stage 2. This project embodies the SOT’s emphasis on the 3R’s: replacing, reducing, and refining animal tests. Her study focuses on improving the in vitro and in vivo relationship between cell-based assay responses and a targeted animal toxicity endpoint to replace the use of animal tests.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Chuanwen Lu
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University
Chuanwen Lu is a Graduate Student at Texas Tech University and received the Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award his work entitled “CRM1: A Characteristic Feature of the Transformed Phenotype in Lung Carcinogenesis and a Potential Target for Lung Cancer Treatment.” His research showed that CRM1 plays an important role in lung cancer development, and that CRM1 overexpression is cooperating with p53 phosphorylation in cell transformation, which is a crucial step in lung carcinogenesis. Along with his previous findings, hisresults suggest that CRM1 may serve as a novel target and its combination treatment with other chemotherapy drugs may provide a promising basis for clinical trials on lung cancer treatment. In the future he hopes to do more work in regard to toxicology and benefit for the people's health and the environment.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Weimin Chen
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD candidate
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Weimin Chen is a PhD candidate of Michigan State University and she received the Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award for her work entitled, “Modulation of HIVgp120-Specific T Cell Responses by Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol In Vitro and In Vivo.” Her project focuses on studying the effects of marijuana-derived compounds, known as cannabinoids, on immune responses to HIV viral antigens. 25% HIV patients use marijuana for nausea, pain and wasting syndrome associated with HIV infection; however, the effects of these cannabinoids on immune system and immune function of immunocompromised HIV patients is not well understood. Cannabinoids are known to have immunomodulatory effects. Therefore, she is establishing mouse models to induce HIV viral antigen-specific immune responses and investigating the effects of cannabinoids on the responses. This award will help further her PhD research and provide financial support for her to attend scientific meetings to present her research and meet other colleagues in the field.

Jean Lu Student Scholarship Award Fund

Recipient: Tongde Wu
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona
Tongde Wu, of the University of Arizona, for his work entitled, “Xbp1 and Nrf2: At the Crossroads of Endoplastic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress.” His work aims to reveal the delicate molecular mechanism that underlies signaling pathways and use them as a model system to guide further medical practice and applications. Investigation of the mechanisms of coordinate regulation will not only shed light on principles of stress response, but may also lead to new approaches to the treatment of stress related diseases. He is hopeful that his understanding in molecular toxicology will eventually turn into a powerful tool, which can provide people a better way to diagnose, treat, and prevent disease.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Burnett
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Ms. Burnett was honored to receive the John Doull Endowment Award from the Risk Assessment Specialty Section (RASS). The award would have allowed her to travel to and present her research at the 2020 SOT Annual Meeting, but as it was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she was thankful for the opportunity to instead present this work at the RASS Virtual Awards Ceremony. She was excited to share this research with the scientific community and gain feedback to advance both the research and her career. She finds it exciting and rewarding to see other scientists interested in their work, and receiving this award encourages her to continue pursuing impactful research.

The primary focus of Ms. Burnett's research is assessing the adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, a known major safety liability of pharmaceutical compounds, and the potential for cardiotoxicity during drug development. Due to the lack of routine cardiotoxicity testing of non-pharmaceutical compounds, thousands of environmental chemicals (pesticides, flame retardants, plastics, etc.) remain untested for their potential cardiovascular adverse effects. Her research aims to assess the cardiotoxicity hazard of environmental chemicals in vitro by using a population of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. Their results showed that various environmental chemicals affect the beating parameters of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes with varied potencies and degrees of population variability. This research demonstrates the feasibility of using a population-based organotypic model for high-throughput cardiotoxicity screening. Ms. Burnett's long-term research interest is in advancing human health risk assessment by utilizing and developing alternative methods for safety evaluation.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Samantha Faber
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Dr. Faber was ecstatic to win such a prestigious award, which will help her to pursue her career goals as a toxicologist.

Her research is focused on development and characterization of a novel in vitro model of the airway for the purpose of investigating lung physiology and disease. Her future goals are to assess the influence of the stroma in manifestation of lung disease and dysfunction. Her research into utilizing this novel transepithelial exposure model to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of inflammation and oxidative stress within airway fibroblasts was commended by receiving the John Doull Award.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tanzir Mortuza
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia

Mr. Mortuza was really excited upon receiving this award. As a risk assessor, he always wanted to get his recognition in this field. This award provided the platform to highlight his research in risk assessment. His end goal is to construct a comprehensive PBPK model to evaluate human risk assessment that will eliminate the uncertainty factor associated with children’s exposure of pyrethroids. This award will facilitate to present research at SOT and meet with experts in risk assessment. Meeting with other experts in the field will enhance his understanding of risk assessment which will enhance his understanding of toxicology. Awards such as this will enable learning of toxicology and will help him to be an independent researcher. Pyrethroids are widely used insecticides. There are more than 200 different kinds of pyrethroid compounds present on the commercial market. Most of these compounds are neurotoxic and highly lipophilic. The toxicity profiles of pyrethroids are compound-specific. Permethrin is one of the major pyrethroids used in pharmaceutical and household products including, lice treatment for children, shampoo, and pet spray. More than one million pounds of permethrin are used in the domestic US market every year. Children between the ages of one and three are most likely ingest these compounds by hand to mouth contact. Despite such wide use, there are limited toxicokinetic (TK) data available for permethrin. Furthermore, there are no comprehensive studies defining the age-dependent TK of pyrethroids. Permethrin is present as a mixture of its cis and trans isomer (CIS and TRANS) in commercial products. Metabolism of these two isomers is significantly different. TRANS is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases and oxidized by cytochrome P450s (CYPs). CIS is minimally susceptible to hydrolysis and is therefore metabolized largely by CYPs. This difference impacts the overall TK of these isomers. However, there are no studies to characterize age-dependent differences in between CIS and TRANS target organ dosimetry. In many cases, animal models are used to predict human risks associated with a specific compound. Usually, a ten-fold uncertainty factor is used in risk assessment to account for inter-species and human sub-population differences. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are widely used in human risk assessment to reduce the uncertainties associated with interspecies and intraspecies differences. Tornero-Velez et al. (2012) constructed a PBPK model for permethrin for different exposure patterns. The investigators monitored CIS and TRANS concentrations in blood and tissues of adult rats dosed with a commercial mixture of the two isomers, in order to assess the accuracy of their simulations. Additional work is necessary to extend their model to immature subjects. Time-course plasma and tissue concentration data are needed for different immature age-groups, as well as for adults. Isomer-specific TK data are required from animals dosed with the individual isomers, in order to avoid the metabolic interactions inherent with mixtures. We addressed this research gap by determining age-dependent TK in rats for CIS and TRANS at several dose levels that will facilitate construction of a comprehensive PBPK model for each isomer of permethrin.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Julia Tobacyk
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS Biology
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

In this project, Ms. Tobacyk investigated whether gene by environment interactions could contribute to obesity in the context of tributyltin (TBT) exposure. In these studies, she and her team exposed four different strains of mice prenatally to low concentrations of TBT in drinking water, a common route of exposure in human populations. Previous research reported that prenatal TBT exposure increases adipocyte size/number and leads to liver steatosis (Chamorro-Garcia et al. 2011). Their studies showed that there are chemicals such as obesogens that may alter lipid metabolism. Her lab became interested and excited about the outcome of their study and therefore, they decided to investigate the effect of genetic background on prenatal TBT exposure. They observed no TBT-dependent changes in bone or fat formation, hepatic steatosis, or hepatic glutathione levels, suggesting that TBT-induced obesogenic outcomes may be context-dependent with modifiers unrelated to gene sequence (such as diet, epigenetics, or yet unknown environmental modifiers). These data may therefore enrich the dialogue regarding how and whether chemicals with obesogenic potential ought to be regulated to protect human populations. She has always been fascinated with the concept of individual responses to xenobiotics within the human population. As a second year pharmacology student, she would love to pursue a career in academia or in industry where to further expand and develop her research interests.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Yongquan Lai
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Youngquan Lai is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received the John Doull Award for his work entitled, "Formation of Endogenous and Exogenous DNA-Protein Crosslinks in Nonhuman Primates and Rats following Inhalation Exposure to [13CD2]-Formaldehyde." Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air, and everyone is exposed to formaldehyde at some concentration daily. Formaldehyde’s well-known toxicity and carcinogenicity, coupled with widespread human exposure, has raised long-standing public health concerns. However, formaldehyde is actually produced inside our bodies as both a product of normal cellular metabolism and as an essential metabolic intermediate generated in all living cells. The challenge is to be able to differentiate whether formaldehyde found inside a person’s body come from external (exogenous) or internal (endogenous) sources, as well as which exposures are most likely to cause DNA damage that can lead to cancer. The most mutagenic form of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage comes from DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). We developed an ultrasensitive, specific method that is able to measure formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslinks and can distinguish between those arising from exposure and those arising from inside our bodies. Our method and data provide critical evidence that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses to cause DNA damage, but did not reach tissues distant to the site of initial contact. On the other hand, relatively high level of endogenous formaldehyde-induced DPCs were naturally present in all examined tissues. These data provide quantitative information on the formation of DPCs by internal and external formaldehyde as factors contributing to disease. Such new data greatly enhance the role of science over default approaches that focus on linear low-dose risk assessment and help set science-based regulatory policies for formaldehyde. Understanding the sources of mutagenic DNA damage that ultimately lead to disease lays the ground work for better disease management and risk assessment. Such data enhance the role of science over default approaches that focus on linear low-dose risk assessment, and promote science-based regulatory policies for creating a safer and healthier world.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Melanie Adler
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Brigham and Women's Hospital, HIM, Renal Division

Melanie Adler is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital, HIM, Renal Division and won the John Doull Award for her work entitled, “Cell-Based Approach to Predict Kidney Toxicity.” Her research in the field of Predictive Toxicology focuses on developing new alternative methods for toxicity testing. Her project emphasizes the application of new cutting edge technologies based on high-throughput measurement methods using primary human cell culture, which enables a better translation into a clinical setting. She is interested in establishing a cell-based quantitative high-throughput screening platform to accelerate safety screening and risk assessment of potential kidney toxic compounds. She hopes to generate a predictive toxico-response signature to classify drugs and chemicals based on their mechanism of toxicity. Furthermore, the human origin of the kidney cells enables a direct exposure and dose-extrapolation to humans. This project has the potential to reduce and replace the use of animals in preclinical toxicity studies. Her future research will focus on using new approaches to get a better mechanistic understanding of the nature of toxicity in order to find new strategies for early detection of toxicity. This involves the implementation of new in vitro models such as organ-on-a-chip, co-culture, and 3D-models.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Church
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences
Rachael Church works for The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences and received the John Doull Award for her paper entitled, “Identification of Genomic Regions Linked to Epigallochatechin Gallate Induced Liver Toxicity using the Diversity Outbred Stock.” She and her lab partners hypothesized that Genome Wide Association (GWA) mapping in DO mice exposed to EGCG would allow them to identify candidate genomic regions influencing the hepatotoxicity of EGCG. Similar to humans, EGCG treatment in DO mice precipitates wide variation in hepatotoxic response, evident from both changes in ALT (terminal-dose to pre-dose) and terminal liver necrosis. In a planned follow-up study, they will genotype suspected risk alleles in DNA collected by the Drug Induced Livery Injury Network (DILIN) from patients with suspected EGCG-induced liver toxicity. They have demonstrated the first application of the DO mice to the detection of xenobiotic risk alleles of toxicity responses. While further validation is needed, and their data suggest that QTL mapping in DO mice may aid in identification of pharmacogenetic risk alleles for compounds causing liver injury. She is hopeful that receiving this award will raise awareness about the value of the DO mouse population as a novel tool for modeling idiosyncratic toxicities and performing high resolution mapping to identify translational genetic risk factors.

John Doull Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alice Crane
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University at Buffalo
Alice L. Crane, of the University of Buffalo, for her abstract entitled, “Effect of CYP2B6 Variants on Chlorpyrifos Metabolism: Implications for Human Risk.” Her work looks at human exposure and susceptibility to chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus pesticide. CPF is in widespread use worldwide and mounting evidence is suggestive of neurobehavioral deficits in the chronically exposed. She examined the kinetics of this bioactivation reaction of CPF by common genetic variants of key enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway of CPF. Knowledge of how the genetic variation of these enzymes affect the bioactivation reaction of CPF and provides an understanding of the variability between individuals. Her current interest is in the examination of human susceptibility to environmental toxicants. She believes that there are many gaps in our current understanding of interindividual susceptibility and that this knowledge is needed to allow us to protect the most sensitive populations. She would like to contribute to risk assessment efforts by understanding the genetic basis of differences between individuals and incorporating this knowledge into models of human exposure.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Durgesh Dwivedi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER)

Mr. Dwivedi was really excited and pleased when he received this prestigious award. He immediately shared the good news with his advisor and also thanked his advisor for his support and encouragement. This award will help Mr. Dwivedi to get recognition in the Society of Toxicology, which is very crucial for a research career. Further, this award will provide recognition of his work and compliment his research in the field of liver toxicology. This award has not only given a positive impact on Mr. Dwivedi but also highly recognized his research. Mr. Dwivedi highly appreciates and thanks the team for giving him this opportunity. He looks forward to serving the society whenever and whichever way it is possible in the future.

Mr. Dwivedi's research involves elucidating the mechanism of liver toxicity in mice and rats induced by liver toxicants, especially involving the role of anti-oxidant signaling in counteracting these toxicities. He has found that medicines used in the treatment of diabetes and neurological disorders also reduce the development of liver toxicities. So in a nutshell, drugs that either reduce the inflammatory condition or increase the anti-oxidant status, deserve further attention for the development of new drugs to treat liver disorders following the same mechanism.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Isha Mhatre
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Kent State University

Ms. Mhatre is honored to receive this award as it is an invaluable recognition of her research. Attending this conference will give her an opportunity to present her research to a large audience and provide her with excellent scientific feedback and knowledge. This award will significantly aid in her career development in the field of neurotoxicology. Ms. Mhatre is grateful to the ASIO for their support.

Ms. Mhatre's research primarily focuses on neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and investigating the mechanisms involved in the progression of the disease. While chronic neuroinflammation has been shown to play a critical role in the etiology of AD, aging and presence of the APOE4 allele have emerged as significant risk factors for the disease, with reports potentially identifying women as a susceptible group. The abstract that she will be presenting is aimed at studying how age, sex, and genotype modify the response to an inflammatory stimulus such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in humanized targeted replacement APOE3 and APOE4 mice. This award will aid her research in elucidating and advancing science's understanding of the mechanisms of how the non-modifiable risk factors modulate inflammatory responses in a complex and multifaceted neurodegenerative disorder such as Alzheimer’s.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Navatha Alugubelly
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Mississippi State University

Ms. Alugubelly is honored to be selected for such a prestigious award. This award allowed her to attend the 2019 SOT meeting. Being a final year graduate student, it was important for Ms. Alugubelly to attend this meeting to network with potential employers, to present her research to larger audience, and to meet with pioneers in her field. Winning this award significantly adds to her accomplishments and boost her resume.She is grateful to the ASIO SOT Endowment Fund for their support.

As a graduate student at the Mississippi State University, Ms. Alugubelly's research work focuses on identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for long-term effects of developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos on behavior. Previous work from her lab demonstrated that the developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos inhibits endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase and increases the endocannabinoid levels at dosages that do not cause any brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition, which is a canonical target of organophosphate pesticides. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in brain development specifically brain maturation and synaptogenesis and emotional behavior. Their previous work also demonstrated that developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos increases social play behavior in adolescent rats. In this study, she demonstrated that the FAAH inhibition during development leads to persistent changes in the glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling which could lead to excitatory-inhibitory imbalance. This imbalance could be responsible for observed altered emotional behavior. The data from this study also suggest that the activation of the opioid signaling could also be responsible for the increased social play behavior.Identifying the non-cholinergic mechanisms of organophosphates at low dosages can help understand the toxicoity of these pesticides better.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sumira Phatak
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Baccalaureate Degree
Institution/Affiliation: Utah State University

She is both honored and humbled to be selected for such a prestigious award that greatly facilitates her attendance at the upcoming SOT meeting. She looks forward to meeting other members of ASIO, allowing her to network with leaders in her field and enhance her skill set. She can see this opportunity open new doors that lead to the next chapter of her career.

As a graduate student in the Benninghoff Laboratory, her innovative work explores the connection between nutrition, colon cancer, and epigenetic modifications. Immediately after arriving at Utah State, she began a multi-generational rodent study; having completed the preclinical portion, she recently moved on to a molecular investigation of mechanisms. The findings from this project will answer her questions about how the standard American diet influences the health outcome of grand-offspring, despite never being directly exposed themselves. Ultimately, she sees herself running her own research program that answers essential questions about how dietherimpacts disease states while optimizing lifestyle intervention strategies.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Abhishek  Venkatratnam
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BTECH and MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina

He was very humbled to receive this news. He would like to thank the ASIO awards committee for selecting me as the recipient of the 2018 ASIO Graduate Student Best Abstract Award.

One of the many challenging issues in toxicology is addressing human variability in adverse effects with chemical exposures. Genetic differences are known to elicit inter-individual differences in xenobiotic metabolism and toxic effects. Traditional toxicity studies often rely on single genotype-based models which fail to capture diverse responses similar to those observed in human populations.The current study is characterizing the extent of genetic background-, dose-, and interaction (genotype & dose) - effects on transcriptional responses in a large panel of genetically-diverse mice exposed to TCE. Several novel outcomes from this study address the problem of human variability in risk assessment. Their results indicate that transcriptional regulation is strongly dependent on genetic background which suggests that single strain models that are currently used may be ineffective in identifying alternative mechanisms of toxicity that maybe observed in the human population. They also identified several pathways that were significantly influenced by genotype-dose interaction effects. Second, they also discovered that many molecular networks were perturbed at doses similar to apical end points of cancer and non-cancer toxicities suggesting the usefulness of gene expression data in estimating toxicity reference values. Next, they observed more than 10-fold variability in the degree of perturbation among several pathways suggesting that safety factors that are currently used in risk assessment maybe under-estimating risk associated with exposures. In summary, results from this study provide a comprehensive outlook on the utility of population-based rodent models in toxicity testing. His future goal is to become a work in regulatory toxicology.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Adhithiya Charli Manohar Charle
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

He is happy and honored to receive this award. He feels this will serve as an impetus for him to do better in the sciences and also further push me closer to my career goals. He, primarily, works on mechanisms by which environmental pesticides exposure induces parkinsons's disease. He focuses on certain epigenetic pathways and also pro-apoptotic kinase activity mediated dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Priti  Prasad
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS and PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prachi Borude
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MTech BPT
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center

The primary focus of Miss Borude's research is to study regulation of liver regeneration after Tylenol overdose, specifically to improve liver regeneration and save patient without liver transplant. In this awarded research work she found that DNA in our liver gets damaged after Tylenol overdose and if that damage is not repaired, the guardian of the genome/DNA (Cell cycle checkpoint) stops the liver regeneration and the recovery in mouse model. Improving the DNA repair and removing the checkpoint may have a therapeutic benefit.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kshama Doshi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Maryland Baltimore

Ms. Doshi's research is focused to design novel treatment regimens for improving long-term clinical outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients with FLT3-ITD mutation. While doing so, she is studying various means and mechanisms to sensitize FLT3-ITD expressing leukemic cells to conventional chemotherapy. This award from ASIO-SOT is for her project which illustrates the effect of modulating Pim kinase activity to enhances the anti-cancer effects of the most widely used chemotherapy drugs

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nikita Joshi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MSc, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Nikita Joshi is a graduate student at Michigan State University who received the Laxman S. Desai Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for her work entitled, "Fibrin(ogen) engagement of aMß2-integrin limits chronic liver fibrosis induced by a bile duct toxicant in mice." Her laboratory previously demonstrated that mice deficient in the blood clotting protein fibrinogen, developed markedly worse liver injury in a model of chronic liver fibrosis. This finding challenged the assumption that the presence of fibrin clots in the liver is uniformly pathologic. Since joining the lab, she has sought to define the mechanisms that underlie the hepatoprotective effects of fibrinogen in this model. Her work has demonstrated that platelets are one mechanism by which fibrinogen inhibits liver injury. The abstract she submitted for presentation at the SOT 2015 meeting and for consideration for this award, describes another element of her research project highlighting a completely different and new mechanism by which fibrinogen inhibits xenobiotic induced liver fibrosis. Her studies over the last year have focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby the key coagulation proteins and their interaction with integrin proteins inhibits liver fibrosis induced by a bile duct toxicant. Liver fibrosis can compromise liver function and cause various cancers. Continued investigation of the mechanisms whereby coagulation-mediated platelet activation inhibits liver fibrosis is warranted, particularly as elements of hemostasis gain traction as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in liver disease and health.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Pooja Naik
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Pooja Naik is a graduate student at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and received the Laxman S. Desai Graduate Student Best Abstract Award for her work entitled, "Differential Impact of Tobacco Smoke Exposure at the Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelium: A Special Focus on the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Mechanisms." Her work is based on toxicological assessment of cigarette products in context of brain and brain vasculature in order to understand the harmful effects of smoking on the brain. For that purpose she conducted mechanistic studies using both cell culture and animal model approaches. Her doctoral research is focused on tobacco smoke (TS) induced toxicity at the blood brain barrier (BBB) microvascular physiology. Despite the strong evidence for an association between TS and vascular impairment, the impact of TS exposure on the BBB has been only marginally addressed. What her research postulates is that whole soluble TS toxicants can compromise BBB endothelium structure as well as function, lead to loss of BBB integrity and tightness, and thus eventually lead to several neurovascular and neurological complications.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Neel Fofaria
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Neel Fofaria is a Graduate Student at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and received the Laxman S. Desai ASIO Student Award for his work entitled “Novel Role of STAT-3 in Anoikis Resistance and Tumor Cell Metastasis” His research showed that cancer becomes lethal when it spreads across the body also known as metastasis. Anoikis is one of the most important processes that plays a vital role in cancer metastasis, which is by far the deadliest form of cancer. His findings established a critical role of STAT-3 in inducing anoikis resistance and therefore enhancing metastasis potential of majority of cancer cells. He hopes to advance his training and research by trying to elucidate the possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis and use that information to design newer therapeutics against cancer. Furthermore, he wishes develop drug delivery systems for tumor targeting and also ensure that any chemicals, oils, polymers, lipids that are used to formulate drug delivery systems are safe and without any adverse toxicity. In all, he wants to play a part in making this world a safer place to live in.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kevin Kumar
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Kevin Kumar is a Graduate Student at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and received the Laxman S. Desai ASIO Student Award his work entitled “A High Throughput Screen for Modulators of Neuronal Manganese Status.” His research showed that Mn is a one of the strongest environmental risk factors for Parkinson’s Disease. He further identified pharmacologically targetable pathways that mitigate Mn as an environmental risk factor in human disease. He successfully conducted a high throughput screen of approximately 40,000 small molecules. He hopes to further focuses on the development and execution of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of small molecules to identify novel modulators of neuronal Mn accumulation. The ultimate goal of his studies is to characterize identified compounds’ clinical utility in the treatment and prevention of these progressive neurodegenerative disorders. He hopes to continue work in drug development and therapeutics for debilitating neurodegenerative diseases that have a toxicological etiology.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Hemantkumar Chavan
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Kansas Medical Center
Hemantkumar Chavan is a graduate student at the University of Kansas Medical Center, who received the Laxman S. Desai Award for his paper entitled, “Xenosensors Mediated Regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter B6 (ABCB6).” His research relates to drug metabolism and how Abcb6, an ATP binding transporter, is regulated by drug sensing receptors. In this study, he and his lab partners worked to show how Abcb6 is regulated by xenosensors like AhR and CAR. He also investigated the role of Abcb6 in regulation of cytochrome P450.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amy Sharma
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Toronto
Amy Sharma is a PhD student of Pharmacology of the University of Toronto, who received the Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award for her work entitled, “Nevirapine-induced Skin Rash is Caused by a Reactive Sulfate Metabolite Formed in the Skin.” Her doctoral thesis examines the role of drug induced adverse reactions. The primary focus of this work is the investigation of the idiosyncratic form, which is undetectable during preclinical or clinical trials. Circumstantial evidence suggests a role for drug metabolism leading to reactive metabolites, which can trigger a maladaptive immune response. The model she used is a skin rash model caused by nevirapine, an anti-HIV agent. Working with others, she elucidated the bioactivation and covalent binding of a nevirapine metabolite in the skin leading to the skin rash, and examined the role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in keratinocytes. Her ultimate goal is to further the field of Immunotoxicology in its entirety, and she wants to do this by becoming a leading expert in the area of drug-induced allergy and toxicity.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nivedita Banerjee
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University
Nivedita Banerjee, of Texas A&M University, for her work entitled, “Pomegranate Polyphenols Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Growth Targeting miRNA-27a and miRNA-155 in the Reduction of Inflammation and Cell Growth” was very excited and thrilled that my work was appreciated through this award. My research involves the safety and efficacy of natural compounds and their role in chemoprevention and chemotherapy. My research interest is to develop functional food for prevention and therapy for various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Laxman S. Desai Association of Scientists of Indian Origin Student Award Fund

Recipient: Vijay More
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island
Vijay More, of the University of Rhode Island, for his work entitled, “Too Much of a Good Thing: Enhanced Nrf2 Activity Leads to Obesity, Steatosis, and Glucose Intolerance.” His research involves Nrf2, which is one of the well-known transcription factors that protect various organs from oxidative stress. Recently, the new data is revealing that Nrf2 also plays role in obesity and diabetes etiology. He hopes to work as a toxicologist in a preclinical unit of a pharma industry. He would like to take part in the mentoring grad students once he gets settled in the industry and volunteer for various activities associated with the CE Program of SOT.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Elise Hickman
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ms. Hickman was excited and honored to receive this award. This award will assist in funding Ms. Hickman's travel to the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, where she will present her research, engage with other researchers, and participate in professional development activities.

At the time of the award, Ms. Hickman was a 3rd year PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She researches the effects of e-cigarettes on the respiratory immune system using both in vitro and human in vivo approaches. She won the Mary Amdur Student Award for her project assessing whether and how e-cigarette use alters the nasal microbiome in human subjects.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Syed Masood
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mr. Masood's initial reaction to receiving the Mary Amdur Student Award from the Inhalation and Respiratory Specialty Section was surprise. The Mary Amdur Student Award is a highly competitive and prestigious award, bestowing an incredible honor to the recipient of the award. The award is recognition of the progress he has made in the lab in his first couple years as a graduate student; it is highly motivating. Receiving the award shows Mr. Masood that the research he does is impactful and thus motivates him to focus and fine tune his research. Receiving the Mary Amdur Student Award is uplifting and motivates him to continue pursue his research in a new revitalized manner.

Isprene hydroxy hydroperoxide (ISOPOOH) is a naturally occurring molecule in the atmosphere produced as byproduct of EPA regulation to lower ozone levels. Very little is known about toxicology of the molecule other than it can produce secondary organic aerosols and cause respiratory inflammatory effects. Mr. Masood has shown ISOPOOH is a very potent in causing oxidative stress in the airway epithelium. He would like to understand how it causes oxidative stress; specifically, he wants to determine its molecular initiating event.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jacklyn Kelty
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Davis

Ms. Kelty was so honored to receive this award. She deeply admires Dr. Amdur and is thrilled to be included in her legacy through this fellowship. This award will help her invest into the Knights Landing community which has collaborated with her throughout her PhD research. They are building a community garden to honor their contribution to our team's training and research. She is excited to use this funding to invest in them as they have invested in her!

Ms. Kelty is a 5th year PhD candidate in Pharmacology and Toxicology at UC Davis. She earned her bachelors degree at Rice University as a double major in Biochemistry-Cell Biology and Environmental Science and currently studies “Personalized Toxicology”. Ms. Kelty measures community exposures to pollution and then models these exposures in the lab to figure out whether or not the pollution is toxic and who in the population is the most susceptible to toxicity. She plans to link community-partnered research with her laboratory toxicology research into her future and is graduating this year! For her PhD dissertation, she works with the small, agricultural community of Knights Landing in collaboration with community leaders, local public health agencies, and academic partners in the UCD Chicana/o Studies Department. In the lab, Ms. Kelty uses animal and in vitro models to test the lung toxicity caused by chemical mixtures, including the influence of liver metabolism. The model she developed for her PhD project maintains the xenobiotic metabolic enzyme activity of the cultured airway cells. She uses this model to compare the toxic response of airway and liver cells from model species and diverse human donors.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Elizabeth Corteselli
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MSPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Ms. Corteselli was thrilled to learn she received the Mary Amdur Student Award. This award will provide assistance for travel to SOT, where she will be able to share findings from her research as well as learn from other researchers in the field.

Her research involves investigating the mechanisms of airway inflammation following exposure to ozone. Specifically, at SOT this year she presented her work characterizing some of the effects of oxidized lipids in airway epithelial cells.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Katherine Duke
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: North Carolina State University
Ms. Duke is extremely honored to be selected to receive this award. Occupational exposure to a fiber-like nanomaterial, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), may pose similar human health risks as asbestos when inhaled. She and colleagues are still investigating how their physiochemical properties affect pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, allergic lung development, and potentially pre-neoplastic lesions in mice and what this means for humans. Katherine has determined the rigidity of two markedly different MWCNTs; she utilized a full body mouse knock-out for the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1, specifically because of its increased susceptibility to fibrogenesis in order to investigate the difference in fibrotic mechanism of each MWCNT. Her work has elucidated that the physicochemical properties of these materials result in greatly different pulmonary effects where the more rigid MWCNT cause prolonged inflammation, mucous cell metaplasia, and greater epithelial cell damage and airway fibrosis compared to the more tangled MWCNT. Furthermore, she has found that STAT1 suppresses the development of fibrosis by downregulating transforming growth factor (TGF) -ß1 production and canonical downstream TGF-ß1 signaling molecules. This work emphasizes the need for intelligent safe engineering of MWCNTs, considering both their applications in consumer products as well as how their physicochemical characteristics affect lung pathology and their implications in human health. Future aims of the project are to further investigate the mechanism of fibrosis resulting from these contrasting MWCNT rigidities in different cell types and to investigate the potential of these MWCNTs to cause pulmonary neoplastic lesions.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sheryse Taylor
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BSc
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Ms. Taylor was surprised and extremely excited to receive this award as it will help fund future studies. Using this award she will be able to purchase materials to further explore the mechanism behind the effects she has observed. Her research focuses on understanding the role of macrophages and nitric oxide metabolism in various models lung injury. In the future she hopes to continue studying the role of the immune system in the development and treatment of cancer. The research for which she was given this award explored the effect of a nitric oxide donor in response to ozone exposure. She found that exposure to increased nitric oxide reduced ozone-induced injury by altering the pro-inflammatory response of the macrophages.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Parker Duffney
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rochester
People who are exposed to cigarette smoke are at an increased risk for viral lung infections, however the mechanism of how cigarette smoke affects the lung immune response to viral pathogens is not fully understood. Mr. Duffney's work investigates how cigarette smoke affects epithelial cells in the lung in the context of a viral challenge. His work shows that cigarette smoke impairs a proper antiviral response to a viral mimetic by disrupting the production of key antiviral molecules. Also he found that proteolytic processing of a key pathogen recognition receptor, TLR3, is necessary for proper anti-viral signaling. Furthermore, exposure to cigarette smoke alters proper TLR3 signaling resulting in a dampened response to a viral mimetic. Future aims of this project look to develop novel therapeutic strategies to resolve smoke-induced immune defects that can be used to treat smokers to lessen the risk of viral lung infections.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew Marshall
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS in Nuclear Engineering
Institution/Affiliation: New York University
It has been well documented that World Trade Center (WTC) dust has contributed to health problems in First Responders (FR). However, the mechanisms for how WTC dust chronically affects FR are not well understood, because a majority of studies have only focused on the fine particle fraction (< 2.5 µm) of WTC dust when it consists primarily of coarse (2.5-10 µm) and supercoarse (> 10 µm) particles. The pH of coarse and supercoarse particles is 10–11 so they have more potential to induce damage by causing prolonged irritation due to their highly alkaline properties. Mr. Marshall's research explores an in vivo model that simulates a WTC dust exposure comparable to 9/11/01 for FR near or around Ground Zero to see the health effects that arise over time from the WTC dust. He used RNA Sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of lung and liver samples from Day 7 and Day 360 post-exposure rats to discover and identify differentially-expressed genes (DEGs). Following RNA Sequencing, he performed pathway analysis on his DEGs to find disparate differences between Day 7 and Day 360. The results illuminated that WTC dust exacerbates injury with time, and it revealed crucial genes that could be causing molecular dysfunctions and disease. When comparing rat Day 360 lung samples to Day 7 lung samples, he found a pathway activation for atherosclerosis, atherosclerotic lesions, and a dilation of the left ventricle. He has received this award specifically for his research on the rat lungs and demonstrating how WTC dust causes irritation to the pulmonary system. This irritation from the coarse fraction of WTC dust creates an inflammatory response, which could be responsible for the formation of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic lesions. Additionally, when comparing Day 360 liver samples to Day 7 liver samples, pathway analysis revealed an increased inflammatory response, increased proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and decreased apoptosis of HSCs. His future research goals for this project are to take the current research and see how it relates to human tissue samples from FR. To date, there have been few transcript studies done on FR so this could help in disease mitigation and better targeted treatment therapies. These findings could truly benefit FR and better their lives.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mary Francis
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Mary Francis is a graduate student at Rutgers University and received the Mary Amdur Student Award for her work entitled, "Tracking Inflammatory Macrophages Accumulation in the Lung after Ozone." Her research is related to infiltrating macrophage subpopulations that play a role in ozone-induced lung injury. A model was created to differentiate between resident and infiltrating macrophages. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages were observed to accumulate in the lung after ozone exposure. Further investigation revealed that these different populations are regulated through chemokine signaling. She believes her research gives insight about how macrophages can induce injury or repair after ozone exposure. It is important to identify mechanisms of macrophage accumulation. Ozone-induced pathogenesis can be selectively inhibited by interrupting one chemokine receptor, CCR2. This result can provide a novel therapeutic approach to lung inflammation and injury.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Pamella Tijerina
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: NYU School of Medicine
Pamella Tijerina is a graduate student at the New York University School of Medicine and received the Mary Amdur Student Award for her work entitled, "Prenatal and Postnatal Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Alters The Developing Immune System of Mice." This study combined prenatal and postnatal exposure to best evaluate the consequences cumulative environmental exposure can have on the developing immune system. The mouse model is ideal due to easy and cost-effective maintenance, as well as having a well-defined immune system. Exposing mice in utero and postnatally to concentrated fine-sized ambient particles (CAPs) encompasses the exposure many children endure. Current results demonstrate the maturation and phenotype of immune cells are altered in a sex-dependent manner due to early life CAPs exposure. Immune responses with skewed cellular profiles have been suggested as a mechanism behind inflammatory diseases such as asthma. This suggests developmental exposure to air pollution may predispose children differently dependent on sex to respiratory diseases. Overall, air pollution continues to be a worldwide epidemic that can be controlled with the enough advocacy and supporting scientific data.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mary A. Popovech
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MPH
Institution/Affiliation: New York University School of Medicine
Mary Popovech is a Graduate Student at New York University School of Medicine and won the Mary Amdur Student Award because of her work entitled, “Acute and Subchronic Exposure to Inhaled Silver Nanoparticles Results in Alterations in Gene Expression, Gene-Specific Promoter Methylation, and Mitochondrial Integrity.” The use of engineered nanomaterials is ubiquitous because of how rapidly they are advancing science and technology. As scientists we have an obligation to not only advance science and technology, but also ensure the safety of health and our environment. Currently, there is a gap in our understanding of the effects of nanomaterials. Her research focuses on expanding our understanding of how engineered nanomaterials interact with the intracellular environment. In vitro studies have suggested that exposure to relevant doses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) pose a threat to human health and the assumption that AgNPs are safe by default is now actively being challenged. In vivo studies are needed to fully delineate and either support or refute recent questions and hypotheses raised by in vitro work. Further, there are critical gaps in our understanding of environmental epigenetics, in particular, concerning the existence of epigenetic alterations occurring from exposure to environmental toxicants, as well as, the time points at which these changes occur. Legitimate concerns exist regarding the potential adverse health effects from NP exposure. Therefore, research that addresses specific critical questions concerning the toxicity and hazards of these technologies is vital to the advancement of the field and the protection of our health and environment. My work has the potential to set standards for consumer products and occupational exposure limits, to safeguard our health.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Desinia Johnson
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill
Desinia Johnson is a second year graduate student of the University of North Carolina Chapel and she received the Mary Amdur Student Award for her work entitled, “Ozone(03): A Potential Contributor to the Metabolic Syndrome.” She hypothesized that ozone exposure may increase systemic mediators that can subsequently target the liver, adipose, and muscle, resulting in glucose intolerance. She observed that Wistar Kyoto Rats exposed to .5 and 1 ppm of ozone had marked glucose intolerance following one and two days of exposure. She and her lab team also observed that there was an increase in specific inflammatory markers, not IL-6, and acute phase proteins in the serum of the ozone-exposed group. In addition, they detected changes in hormones that are involved in glucose homeostasis, such as insulin, leptin, and epinephrine. She is hopeful her work will continue to make an impact and a difference in the field of toxicology like Dr. Amdur did during her career.

Mary Amdur Student Award Fund

Recipient: Alex Carll
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MSPH, BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/US EPA
Alex P. Carll, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for his work entitled, “Treadmill Stress Test after Diesel Exhaust Particulate Exposure Reveals a Time-Dependent Shift from Parasympathetic to Sympathetic Dominance.” He incorporated a treadmill exercise stress test and the electrocardiogram to determine effects of diesel exhaust particle exposure on cardiovascular function in rats with preexisting cardiovascular disease. He hopes to advance the science of toxicology in the 21st century by incorporating physiologic measurements to yield new understandings of the mechanisms behind the adverse health effects of air pollution.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Damaris Albores-Garcia
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Florida International University

Dr. Albores-Garcia is very happy and proud that her work is being recognized by her peers. She is looking forward to presenting her work in the upcoming SOT meeting and hopefully receiving a lot of feedback on her research. Thank you!

Dr. Albores-Garcia's research focuses on finding if lead exposure contributes to schizophrenia and substance use disorder. Understanding this will help researchers to find the mechanisms behind the comorbidity and to explore treatments to ameliorate the deleterious effects of lead exposure.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Danqi Chen
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: New York University

It is Dr. Chen's great honor to receive this award. It is an acknowledgment of her research in the Metals field. It can promote her to go further in this field in the future.

Dr. Chen is working on the molecular mechanism of some environmental and occupational carcinogens, such as Hexavalent Chromium, Arsenic, and formaldehyde. She thinks the fundamental study of environmental carcinogens is an important part of occupational health study. Among these, she is mainly focused on the effects of arsenic (As) on histone mRNA polyadenylation, cell transformation, and chromatin assembly. Arsenic is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a group 1 human carcinogen. The mechanisms that underlie arsenic-mediated carcinogenesis, including epigenetic alterations, are not fully understood. Dr. Chen found for the first time a profound increase in polyadenylation of all the canonical histone mRNAs following As exposure. She further demonstrated that As induces the loss of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), preventing proper canonical histone pre-mRNA processing and, subsequently resulting in the aberrant polyadenylation of the mRNA. The addition of the poly (A) tail to the canonical histone mRNA increased the mRNA stability, allowing the polyadenylated histones to be present not only in S phase but in other phases of the cell cycle as well. This alteration disrupted nucleosome assembly, transcription, and genomic stability. In particular, the ChIP-seq results revealed that induction of polyadenylated H3.1 mRNA results in the displacement of the variant H3.3 from critical gene regulatory elements such as active promoters, insulators, and enhancers. H3.3 displacement appeared to be critical for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, since knockdown of H3.3 by siRNA induced cell transformation, whereas overexpression of H3.3 rescued cells from arsenic-induced cell transformation. Her study uncovered polyadenylation of H3.1 mRNA and displacement of H3.3 from regulatory elements as a potential new mechanism for As carcinogenesis. Dr. Chen's findings might add new insight not only into the oncogenic role for histone variant H3.3 but also into genomic instability induced by the imbalance in histone stoichiometry.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Liang Chi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill

Mr. Chi was really excited when he learned he received this award. It is a great honor for him, and it will encourage him to continuously study how the interactions of gut microbiota and environmental pollutants can affect host health.

His study mainly focused on functional interactions between gut microbiota and arsenic exposure. Mr. Chi's previous work demonstrates that gut microbiota plays a critical role in arsenic bioavailability and biotransformation in mice. Moreover, chronic arsenic exposure can dramatically change gut microbiota, including perturbing normal community structure, changing the richness of functional genes and metabolites. Here, he demonstrated that transplanting the gut microbiota from arsenic-exposed mice to healthy mice can induce glucose intolerance in the recipients. Correspondingly, gene expression associated with glucose metabolism in adipose tissues and livers are affected by arsenic-perturbed gut microbiota. The current study reveals that arsenic-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis could play a role in arsenic-associated toxic effects and thus modulation of the gut microbiota might be an intervention strategy to ameliorate the diabetic effects of arsenic exposure.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Cassandra Meakin
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ms. Meakin was very honored and humbled to receive this award. The award will help her to cover the cost of travel and expenses to the SOT Annual Meeting.

Ms. Meakin examined the effects of arsenic as an endocrine disruptor during pregnancy. She is interested in how exposures during development lead to later life health outcomes. She would like to remain in academia and pursue a K grant to start her own lab. This award was given to Ms. Meakin for her work investigating arsenic altering the glucocorticoid receptor pathway in the placenta.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Jamie Young
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BA, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisville

As a former Metals Specialty Section student representative, Ms. Young knows the impressive pool of research that is submitted for consideration for this award every year. Thus, upon receiving notification of winning the Graduate Student Research Award she was ecstatic and humbled. Receiving such a prestigious award from the very group where she started her SOT career is amazing. In addition, her current research, focused on metal-enhanced, diet induced disease, has been greatly influenced by a number of past and current Metals Specialty Section members and their research. Hence, receiving this award will allow Ms. Young's work and ideas to be highlighted among a group of esteemed scientists in a similar field who can provide feedback, ideas and suggestion for future directions and possible collaborations. She is truly grateful!

Currently Ms. Young's research is focused on the interactions between cadmium, a non-essential metal, and high fat diet in the development of liver disease and the use of dietary zinc to stop disease initiation and progression. This project takes into consideration that environmental exposures are typically multigenerational and life-long, and that factors, such as diet, are involved in the development of disease. She proposes whole life, low dose cadmium exposure will enhance metabolic syndrome associated with consumption of a high fat diet, resulting in liver disease and that zinc plays a key role in determining this outcome. Additionally, liver diseases, like many metabolic diseases, is sexually dimorphic with men more likely to develop the diseases then women. However, women tend to accumulate more cadmium in their bodies then men. Therefore, Ms. Young is also investigating gender as a risk factor for cadmium-enhanced, diet-induced liver disease. Her future goal is to develop into a successful, independent scientist with knowledge and expertise in a broad range of research areas that will allow her to pursue her own research in metal-induced diseases, therapeutic targets, and environmental health. More specifically Ms. Young's long term research interest is in studying the mechanisms and sex specific differences in metal-induced diseases with focus on lung cancer.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Ranran Zhang
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Dr. Zhang felt honored and excited to receive the Metals Specialty Section Research Award. SOT’s recognition of her efforts through this award has increased her confidence to keep pursing her dream of becoming an independent researcher in the field of toxicology in the future.

Dr. Zhang's interest and research focus on illustrating the interaction of human placental transporters with the toxic heavy metal cadmium. During pregnancy, the mother is exposed to both drugs and environmental compounds. While the placenta generally forms a good barrier against fetal exposure, some drugs as well as toxic compounds can accumulate in the placenta and potentially reach the fetus. For instance, cadmium (Cd) which is a non-essential toxic metal widespread in environment, is detectable in 97% of pregnant women. Studies have found adverse associations of Cd levels with birth weight and perinatal growth. As a result of developmental delays in growth and development, this impairment may persist through childhood. As a result, it is critical to identify mechanisms that regulate Cd accumulation and responses in trophoblasts. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify critical protective pathways within the placenta to reduce the risk of long-term developmental toxicity. One potential mechanism to prevent Cd accumulation is the efflux transporter BCRP, which is abundantly expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts in human placenta. To assess the ability of BCRP to protect the fetus from Cd exposure, Dr. Zhang is conducting two research projects including:1) relationships between Cd level in human placentas (N=28) with birth outcomes (i.e., baby weight) and transporter levels; and 2) in vitro studies directly assessing the ability of BCRP to efflux cadmium and protect against placenta toxicity using genetically-modified trophoblasts. In addition to these projects, she is scaling up her methods and will apply them to a large birth cohort of 290 babies as well as ex vivo studies using fresh human placenta tissue exposed to cadmium and transporter inhibitors.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Jiqun Wang
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisville

Dr. Wang was so excited when he received this award. Definitely, it was a big surprise for him and it was also a recognition of his work. This will give him the motivation to continue his research in this field.

As is known to everyone, diabetes can induce cardiac damage, which is often fatal. Previous studies have shown that using sulforaphane or zinc alone has cardioprotective effects, and Dr. Wang's study aims to investigate whether the combination of the two provides better protection. In future research, he will strive to discover more potential mechanisms and how to translate into the clinic.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Xian Wu
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: NIEHS/NTP

Dr. Wu was surprised and then very excited upon receiving the award. The award encouraged him to continue his work in the area of stem cell modeling methodology for metal toxicology research. Although the technology is still underestimated however he does believe in the very near future he can see more awards being given to stem cell work.

Dr. Wu's research focus on developing 2D and 3D stem cell model for toxicology research. The future goal is to set standard for adverse outcome pathway using stem cell model for risk assessment. He first developed a cell model to characterize cardiomyocyte differentiation based on the florescence tag incorporated which reduced the cost for screening. The model was demonstrated helpful in identifying the heavy metal cadmium and arsenic toxicity and at molecular level the two metals acted through different stages during cardiomyocyte differentiation. The mechanism study was awarded Metals Specialty Section Research Award.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Damaris Albores Garcia
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Florida International University

Dr. Arbores Garcia was so honored to receive this award and the recognition for her work by such an outstanding scientific group. She believes it is very helpful to be involved in the Metals Specialty Section because she receive a lot of feedback from researchers in the field, and this gives her the opportunity to improve her work.

Her work is focused on elucidating whether early-life lead exposure prompts sensitization to the psychostimulant effects of cocaine during early adolescence, given that adolescence is a high-risk period for new drug use. Her results suggest that early-life lead exposure could predispose drug use in early adolescence. Also, the results emphasize the importance of continuing efforts aimed to diminish lead exposure.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Madelyn Huang
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dr. Huang was grateful and excited that others in the metals field acknowledge the importance of the work she and her colleagues are doing. This award was essential in supporting her travel to SOT this year in order to present not only this work but also another poster. The discussion at SOT was useful and was a great opportunity for her and her team to share their knowledge with other arsenic researchers.

The Styblo lab studies the relationship between arsenic exposure and metabolic disease, such as diabetes. They are interested in understanding the underlying mechanisms and how genetic and nutritional factors can influence susceptibility to this disease. Their goal is to be able to identify mechanisms or factors that could be leveraged to better inform risk assessment and improve intervention strategies to protect against arsenic-associated disease. B vitamins are often cited as a potential intervention to protect against arsenic-associated disease. However, this strategy has not been thoroughly tested in humans or animals. This award was given for her research investigating if folate supplementation in mice could stimulate arsenic metabolism and protect against arsenic-associated diabetes, with and without a high-fat diet.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Elizabeth Martin
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BSPH, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Dr. Martin was very excited and honored to have received this award. She is excited to be working towards a manuscript for the presented research. She was hesitant about it because she wasn't sure about the level of interest or how well received it would be. Seeing people were interested in this type of data integration was very gratifying. 

Arsenic has been associated with increased prevalence in diabetes in human populations and specific mutations in the gene Arsenic-3-methyltransferase (AS3MT) can predispose individuals to developing diabetes. AS3MT genotype is also important for determining the rate at which arsenic is metabolized. Additionally,  in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that differences in arsenic metabolic are important for diabetes risk. However, what is not known is whether AS3MT genotype is associated with key metabolic changes, beyond arsenic metabolism, that may play a role diabetes development in humans. To address whether AS3MT genotype is able to influence other metabolic processes beyond arsenic metabolism, they integrated metabolite profile data, 221 plasma metabolites and 297 urinary metabolites, with single nucleotide polymorphic (SNPs) variant data for 7 key SNPs in AS3MT across 123 indivdiuals. They found four SNPs were associated with 12 urinary metabolites and 1 plasma metabolite. Interestingly these metabolites play key roles in amino acid metabolism, which is an indicator of risk of diabetes development. These results suggest that AS3MT genotype may play a role diabetes risk for individuals exposed to arsenic. Moving forward they hope to continue this research to understand how arsenic is able to influence amino acid metabolism and what roles amino acids may play in diabetes risk. 

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Dharmin  Rokad
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MS in Pharmacology and Biotechnology
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Mr. Rokad felt it was unbelievable and at the same time very encouraging experience. He won this award at this time of his career in graduate research studies. He plans to pursue a career in Academia where he would like to continue investigating the role of metal exposure in increasing risk of chronic neurological diseases at molecular levels, including various crucial mechanisms. This award sponsored by the Metals Speciality Section in recognition of his ongoing work was important step in realizing his career goal.

His PhD research focuses on divalent manganese (Mn) interactions with α-Synuclein protein and neurodegeneration. His current project focuses on investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in manganese-induced misfolded α-Synuclein release through exosomes and its relevance to synucleopathies. While it is known that Mn is an essential component of many enzymes, it helps in proper bone formation but occupational exposure to elevated doses of Mn can lead to Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson’s disease. Despite evidences of Mn induced neurodegeneration, the key cellular-molecular signaling mechanisms driving manganese-induced exosomes release remain unknown. He is currently evaluating the role of manganese in modulating endosomal protein trafficking mechanisms to promote α-synuclein exosomal release. Identifying the key molecular regulators of the endosomal protein trafficking mechanisms will help him and his team target those key proteins to develop medical agents and help them to discover biomarkers to develop early stage diagnostic techniques, which will be crucial in the field of neurodegenerative diseases.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Kristal Rychlik
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Dr. Rychlik was happily surprised to receive this award. She has recently entered the field of metals toxicology (last July) so she was excited to have her new work recognized in this way. This award aided in her travel to the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting where she was able to present her work, receive feedback from colleagues, and network with scientists in her new area of metals toxicology.

Her main research goal includes investigating prenatal and early life exposures and the effects on disease later in life. In her current position, she studies the effects of prenatal exposure to arsenic on immune outcomes and reaction to infectious disease in a mouse model. The research she presented at SOT indicates that arsenic has effects on the immune system in a sex-specific manner even prior to infection with H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in their mouse model. Her next steps include investigating the mechanisms of these alterations and their effect on immune reactions.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Souvarish Sarkar
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Dr. Sarkar was pleasantly surprised to be awarded the Metals research award at SOT 2017 and it further validated the importance of his work.

His current focus of work is to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind inflammation in metal induced neurotoxicity. Specifically, he is working on the mechanism involving NLRP3 inflammasome activation and propagation of inflammasome induced by manganese in microglia. The translational potential of this study is significant given that microglial activation has been linked to multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Jenna Currier
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: ORISE at US EPA

As a current postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. EPA, Dr. Currier is studying the underlying mechanisms that differentiate cellular responses to oxidative exposures in human lung cells for the purpose of biomarker discovery and predictive model development using a systems biology approach. The work for which she won this award involved characterizing adverse effects in human lung cells and determining gene expression changes that can distinguish exposures at the tipping point of cell death.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Anna Kopec
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver injury in the U.S. and other developed countries, because APAP is present in >600 over-the-counter and prescription medications, making accidental (as well as intentional) overdose a serious public concern. Current therapies for management of APAP overdose patients are very limited and are usually only effective when administered very early. Understanding the mechanisms of liver repair after APAP overdose is necessary to develop effective therapies to stimulate liver regeneration and re-establish liver function in patients after APAP overdose. Dr. Kopec's work focuses on understanding the role of fibrinogen in APAP-hepatotoxicity. Utilizing mice with a specific mutation in fibrinogen molecule that lacks a binding motif for an integrin expressed on leukocytes she identified key molecular events and a novel pathway of liver regeneration after APAP overdose in mice. Her studies are aimed at identifying existing knowledge gaps and are likely to reveal novel strategies to prevent liver failure after APAP overdose, even in patients presenting with extensive hepatotoxicity.

Metals Specialty Section Student Research Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka  Trivedi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Dr. Trivedi's research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. Kidney fibrosis, the hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is an irreversible process leading to the life-threatening end-stage renal failure. Unfortunately, no effective therapeutic strategies are available to cure this condition. This is due to lack of our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis. Using RNA sequencing, she and her colleagues identified phospholipase D4 (PLD4) as one of the targets for the treatment of kidney fibrosis. Our research work deciphers a mechanistic role of PLD4 in the regulation of fibrosis. They observed that PLD4 was significantly increased in mechanistically different mouse models of kidney fibrosis as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Furthermore, they found that PLD4 knockout mice (PLD4-/-) showed less fibrosis compared to the wild type (PLD4+/+) mice after folic acid injection- as well as unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney fibrosis. This was attributed to mainly two reasons, (i) PLD4-/- mice had increased level of anti-fibrotic cytokines compared to the PLD4+/+ mice and, (ii) sustained activation of the proteases, due to decreased level of serpina1 (a protease inhibitor) in PLD4-/- mice, led to an efficient degradation of collagen rescuing these mice from scar tissue formation in the kidney. Thus they identified that PLD4 is a central target that can be intervened in preventing fibrosis-associated organ dysfunction. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the mechanistic toxicological sciences, which can be translated clinically.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mathia Colwell
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Minnesota

Ms. Colwell was overjoyed and incredibly honored for the recognition of her research. Receiving this award will give her the opportunity to share her research with a large audience and continue to advance her knowledge in the area of modifying the epigenome.

Ms. Colwell was granted this award based upon her research using decitabine as a hypomethylating agent in a whole mouse model. Her findings indicate decitabine, a popular DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, does not preferentially demethylate the epigenome or dysregulate gene expression uniformly in somatic tissues. Her current research focus is on the effects of intergenerational arsenic exposure on the mouse epigenome, and how it influences adult health in the unexposed offspring. Her future goal is to advance her understanding of epigenetic reprogramming and how in utero exposures can affect the onset of disease in adult offspring.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Subham Dasgupta
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Dr. Dasgupta was absolutely delighted and honored to receive this award and recognition from his peers and stalwarts within the field. In addition to supporting his travel to SOT, this will encourage him to explore more research areas and techniques within the fields of molecular and systems toxicology and work harder to contribute more to the field. The recognition will also give him an opportunity to network with faculty and fellow postdocs and gain new insights into career development and research areas that will definitely elevate his career directions. Dr. Dasgupta thanks Dr. Volz for being a great mentor and members of the Volz and Liu labs, specifically Ms. Aalekhya Reddam for their support in this study.

Dr. Dasgupta's research interests lie in investigation and discover of mechanisms of early developmental toxicity induced by common environmental contaminants. Using zebrafish as a model, he is specifically interested in toxicant-induced transcriptomic disruptions in processes that regulate cell division, migration, germ layer formation and their effects on the downstream developmental trajectory of the embryo. He is also interested in the role of epigenetic mechanisms, miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs in development and transgenerational toxicity. Mr. Dasgupta's submitted SOT abstract identifies perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA) as a developmental toxicant from a screen of PFASs. Subsequently, using mRNA sequencing and additional morphometric assessments, he shows that PFOSA can also lead to a disruption and inhibition of hepatic development.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jennifer Schaefer
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University

Ms. Schaefer was ecstatic and over-filled with joy upon receiving an email notification that she had won the 3rd place MSBSS Graduate Student Research Award. For she and her colleagues who had worked together on the project, to be recognized and acknowledged for their hard work truly means a lot to her. Her thesis work heavily investigates critical physiological and biological mechanisms that regulate fertility status and early pregnancy events by focusing on key molecules (aquaporins), systems (reproductive axis specifically the uterus and placenta), and Gαq/11-coupled receptors. Winning an award within her research field gives her more motivation in elucidating these complex mechanisms in the hope of developing new therapies and discovering biomarkers for infertility and pregnancy complications/conditions. Receiving this award will help Ms. Schaefer further pursue her research by aiding in the funds to attend the SOT meeting where she plans to network with fellow peers, colleagues, and experts in multiple disciplines along with expanding her knowledge in different backgrounds that would enrich her intellectual growth, research skills, career development as a toxicologist, and scientific knowledge. Being able to present her research, encouraging and enhancing her scientific communication skills to a wide variety of people with diverse backgrounds will allow her to break scientific communication barriers and gain new insight and ideas into her research project whether it be a different parameter to look at or new method/technique that will advance her future investigations. Attending and presenting at SOT will also allow Ms. Schaefer to share her area of expertise, research, and perspective in hopes of also furthering another’s research. At SOT, she will attend multiple platform and poster presentations where she will be able to learn about other molecules, mechanisms, experimental designs, and modeling to name a few, that she can utilize in future development of techniques to investigate her hypotheses.

Much of Ms. Schaefer's research comprises on better understanding the importance of key molecules such as aquaporins and Gαq/11-coupled receptor signaling, in regulating fertility status along with the establishment and maintenance of a successful pregnancy. This is a major goal of her lab since over 7 million American women of reproductive age are infertile. A uterus that is unreceptive to embryo implantation is a major cause of infertility. Regulation of uterine luminal fluid levels during early pregnancy is essential for successful reproduction and a determinant of fertility in both rodents and humans. In both rodents and humans, excessive luminal fluid can have a negative impact on pregnancy such as implantation failure as too much fluid reduces contact between the embryo and luminal epithelium. Aquaporins are bidirectional transporters that move water along a concentration gradient, regulating water homeostasis. To date, 13 mammalian AQPs (AQP0–12) have been identified, but in the mouse, Aqp10 is a pseudogene, and thus only 12 Aqp genes encode functional proteins. Being the recipient of the MSBSS award was based off the specific research investigating the hypothesis that mouse uterine AQPs regulate luminal fluid levels in the preimplantation period and are impacted by estradiol and progesterone. To better understand their roles in regulating luminal fluid levels in the preimplantation period, Ms. Schaefer conducted a multi-pronged analysis of uterine Aqp/AQP expression on the morning of D1 and D4 of pregnancy in ovarian superovulated and non-superovulated WT C57 Bl/6 mice. Expression was also determined in ovariectomized mice that received E2, P4 or E2 + P4 and in D4 pregnant RU486-treated mice. Major conclusions from her study revealed that uterine AQPs are dynamically regulated by E2 and P4 in the pregnant mouse uterus during the preimplantation period and this could have a major impact on uterine fluid homeostasis not just in the mouse but also in pregnant women. Furthermore, she demonstrated clearly that for many of the AQPs, their expression is significantly altered following supraphysiological levels of E2 and P4 via ovarian superovulation (such as those encountered during IVF therapy and upon exposure to various endocrine disrupting chemicals or environmental toxins) which have an impact on female reproductive functions during early pregnancy. Ms. Schaefer's future thesis work will continue to explore the role of aquaporins in crucial signaling pathways involved in early pregnancy events and how compounds that alter levels of estradiol or progesterone (environmental toxins or endocrine disrupting chemicals) affect aquaporin expression and other critical genes and proteins involved in early pregnancy. The use of aquaporins will serve as a valuable tool in testing to see if specific pathways relating to water homeostasis, fertility, female reproduction function, and early pregnancy events (uterine receptivity, preimplantation, and embryo implantation) become altered. Measuring aquaporin expression can be a new marker of normal function as altered expression is also predicted to occur in any pathological state that changes the normal E2:P4 ratio and this could impact negatively on fertility. This will be utilized in her other work studying novel Gαq/11-coupled receptors that are major regulators of fertility such as the kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) and GPR83. Overall, elucidation of critical receptors and molecules involved in fertility status and early pregnancy events will aid in the development of new targeted therapies and discovery of biomarkers for infertility and pregnancy complications/conditions.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Emily Severance
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Ms. Severance is very grateful to receive this award and to have her research recognized. This award helps her present her research and meet professionals in the toxicology field at SOT.

Ms. Severance's research is on Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). PFOS is a persistent environmental toxicant historically found in firefighting foams and consumer products. Her research investigates how PFOS interacts with the Nrf2 antioxidant response pathway and the underlying mechanism behind PFOS induced oxidative stress in human kidney cells. So far she has found that PFOS activates Nrf2 and indirectly causes oxidative stress. Future research will include investigating the affects of PFOS on pancreatic beta cells.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tara Catron
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: BASF Corporation

Dr. Catron was very excited to learn that she received this award, as it highlights the importance of the research her postdoc lab is conducting trying to link changes in host-associated microbiota to potential adverse health outcomes, and is a strong motivator for continuing to do investigate this critical question.

During her postdoc, Dr. Catron studied how host-associated microbial communities interact with environmental chemicals during early development to influence toxicity outcomes, using zebrafish as a model. Specifically, she focused on examining the interaction between microbiota and the brain using zebrafish behavioral assays as a functional readout of brain development and function. The project for which she won the MSBSS Postdoc Award relied on zebrafish with and without microbes to explore how colonization status might impact behavioral toxicity triggered by estradiol, a potent estrogen receptor agonist that plays an important role in early brain development. The results demonstrated that phase-specific behavioral effects (decrease in movement) were observed in zebrafish larvae exposed to estradiol in colonized zebrafish only. Concentrations of estradiol and direct estradiol metabolites were also higher in microbe-free zebrafish, suggesting that microbes influence chemical metabolism. This experience made Dr. Catron want to pursue a career where she could focus on the “big picture” rather than whether a chemical is simply “hazardous.” She recently transitioned into a career at BASF Corporation where she performs ecological risk assessments, designs and monitors studies, and provides support for agricultural product registration on a global scale.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Matthew Wyatt Cole
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: Kenyon College

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Ryan Mote
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MBA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia

This award will help further Mr. Mote's research career by addition of the prestigious award to his CV, while also allowing him the confidence to move forward knowing that his mentors and peers in the scientific community believe in the importance of this work.

Essentially, the goal of Mr. Mote's research (and the research for which this award was won) is to increase cattle production efficiency under hot and humid environmental conditions through big data approaches. The overarching goal of this research is to increase profitability and lessen the environmental impact of agricultural production systems by improving production efficiency in pasture-based systems as the public interest in grass-based, natural production of livestock grows. In the future, he plans apply for the presidential management fellowship to work with the USDA in sustainable agriculture, as climate change will negatively impact the agricultural sector, the need for sustainable production of food sources will continue to grow throughout the world, and he believes that the training and encouragement he has received in his doctoral training program have placed him in a position to contribute to this noble cause.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kari Neier
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Michigan

Ms. Neier was thrilled to receive this award! This award will help her in advancing her research through presenting her work to multiple audiences which will allow her to gain new perspectives and insights.

Ms. Neier is researching how exposures to chemicals in plastics during development influence the long-term risk of metabolic disorders, such as obesity. The research for which she won this award seeks to identify molecular pathways that may be re-programmed in liver and adipose tissue by developmental exposures to phthalates and phthalate mixtures.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Samantha Faber
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill / USEPA

Dr. Faber was excited upon receiving the Molecular Biology Specialty Section Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award as validation of her research. This will help her to pursue larger grants in the future.

Dr. Faber's research encompasses the study of the effect of environmental air pollutants on human health, molecular and systems biology.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Kazzaz
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Kenyon College

Ms. Kazzaz was very excited to win this award and eager to share the news with her research advisor. This award demonstrates her dedication and tenacity in her research project and in the laboratory in general. This is then demonstrated to medical schools and graduate schools, to illustrate her passion for research, which subsequently allows her to further her education and research.

She works in a molecular biology laboratory that focuses the systematic effects of environmental toxins in frogs, as mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. The laboratory has also studied the evolution of the receptor among amphibians. Her research focuses on the receptor in caecilians, the most ancestral order of amphibians. This study will further illuminate the evolutionary differences between this receptor in amphibians and all other vertebrates. To characterize this receptor in caecilians, she has analyzed the sequence, structure, specific-binding characteristics and transactivation response of the receptor in the caecilian Gymnopis multiplicata. This study has found that, similar to other amphibians, this species exhibits low responsiveness to one of its most potent agonists (TCDD).

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prarthana Shankar
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS Biology
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Shankar was very excited especially because she had not yet won an award in Graduate School! She immediately let her postdoc mentor and PI know, as they were critical in not only encouraging her to apply for this award, but also in training her in various techniques during her time in Graduate School. This award has not only given her more confidence in her research, but she would also like to use it to travel to a couple of interesting conferences in the near future. Conferences are critical in putting her outside her comfort zone - to network with people and learn as much as possible, and for this she would like to thank the organizing committee for the award.

She is working with a class of chemicals called Polycyclic Aromatic Hyrdocarbons or PAHs, which we are exposed to every day via sources like cigarette smoke and vehicle exhaust. The details of their mechanism of action are unclear, and she is investigating how they cause toxicity using the zebrafish model organism. Identifying specific downstream gene targets as a result of PAH exposure can help make better regulatory decisions. She and her team previously identified one of these targets that they call "slincR" (a long RNA that does not code for protein) that seems to be involved in PAH (and more specifically, dioxin or TCDD) toxicity endpoints like blood hemorrhaging. She and  her team also identified potential mouse and human orthologs of slincR, which supports the human health relevance of the zebrafish model. Her future goals are to confirm the role of slincR and identify other genes/RNAs that could be involved in the PAH toxicity pathway.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Julia Tobacyk
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Upon her receipt of this award she experienced a combination of excitement, disbelieve, and joy.  Ms. Tobacyk was pleasantly surprised and enthusiastic to be selected as the recipient of the MSBSS Graduate Student Research Award. She is very grateful to her supervisor, Dr. Alison Harrill, and her lab members, Haixia Lin, Shaoke Luo, and Lascelles Lyn Cook for helping her with her studies. She would like to sincerely thank them for their research supervision and support which was instrumental in her receiving this award. She plans to use the  award stipend for future professional travel and conference expenses.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and devastating problem in the clinical. Diagnosing and monitoring AKI is difficult by a lack of sensitive biomarkers for renal injury detection. Clinically, AKI is diagnosed using the “gold standard” biomarkers such as serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen; however, these biomarkers do not become elevated until severe kidney injury has occurred. Thus, there is a need for better kidney injury biomarkers which would benefit both preclinical drug development and clinical care. Most research done in biomarkers uses genetically limited animal models. Since there are clear population differences among us, their research utilizes a genetically diverse mouse population, the Diversity Outbred (DO), as a platform for identifying and evaluating novel biomarkers associated with AKI. In their studies, they look at protein and microRNA biomarkers and compare their performance with the currently used in the clinic biomarkers and they show that many tested biomarkers are more sensitive and specific in detecting kidney injury than the “gold standard” biomarkers. This approach has promise not only for drugs that induce AKI but also other conditions, diseases and pathologies. Further implications of this study are that these biomarkers can be used in the clinic, where interindividual heterogeneity is present within patient populations. She has always been fascinated with the concept of individual responses to xenobiotics within the human population. As a doctoral pharmacology student, she would love to pursue a career in academia or in industry where she could further expand and develop her research interests.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Abhishek  Venkatratnam
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BTECH, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Mr. Venkatratnam was very humbled to hear the news and is grateful to the Molecular and Systems Biology Selection Committee for selecting him as a recipient of this award. His long-term goal is to pursue a career in regulatory toxicology and this award has vastly helped to bring recognition to his doctoral dissertation which addresses several critical gaps in safety assessments.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Gloria Garcia
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS in Biology
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Garcia was pleased to win the award. She is not sure how winning this award will help me pursue my research. Preparing the submission did help me with my science communication skills. The foundation of her research is based on the pursuit of understanding the relationship between the genotype-environment-phenotype. Her dream is to stay in academia and eventually run her own lab. Using the zebrafish model and a combination of techniques including anti-sense knockdown, qPCR, in situ hybridization, larval behavioral assays, and RNA-seq we are interested in testing the hypothesize that a conserved non-coding RNA (slincR) is a direct Ahr target gene that represses Sox9b upon induction by strong Ahr ligands to produce target organ toxicity.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Lacher
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Minnesota

Dr. Lacher was delighted and extremely honored to find out that she was the first place award winner for the MSBSS 2017 Postdoctoral Fellow Award. She chose to switch fields when starting my current Postdoctoral position, thus she is new to the field of Molecular and Systems Biology. She is honored be selected for this award as this suggests that her current research focus is meaningful to the MSBSS members. She presented a 5-minute research synopsis at the MSBSS reception which provided her with the much-needed opportunity to network with experts in the field of Molecular and Systems Biology. This extension of her network will undoubtedly lead to to future collaborations and success in her future research.Her current research is focused upon environmental stress at the cellular level. Specifically, she is interested in how the cell responds to stress in terms of global changes in gene transcription. She and colleagues are taking a genome-wide approach to this question by characterizing the regulatory network of one of the most well known stress-responsive transcription factors, Nrf2. Historically Nrf2 activation was considered protective, however, recently evidence has been presented that in certain contexts, Nrf2 activation can be harmful. Thus it is imperative to develop more comprehensive models of Nrf2-mediated gene transcription. She predicted that full characterization of the global NRF2 gene network would provide the mechanistic information needed to understand how NRF2 binding specificity influences gene transcription. She then used this information to characterize how individual genetic variation identified in genome wide association studies (GWAS) can influence Nrf2 binding, gene transcription, and disease risk. She shifted fields when she took her current postdoctoral position, and the gained expertise in molecular genetics and biochemistry has allowed her to diversify her skill set as a toxicologist and has poised her to reach the goal of becoming an independent investigator.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Elizabeth Mutter-Rottmayer
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Ms. Mutter-Rottmayer is very excited to be the first place recipient of the Molecular and Systems Biology Specialty Section Graduate Student Award! Receiving this award is not only a great motivator, and has encouraged her to pursue future directions in understanding mechanisms of chemoresistance, but will also provide important exposure to this work that may ultimately lead to improved patient outcome. She is currently conducting research to uncover how mechanisms of DNA repair may alter both environmental susceptibility as well as the efficacy of chemotherapeutic genotoxins, thus contributing to carcinogenesis. She was specifically acknowledged for her research investigating a cancer cell-specific regulator of the Fanconi Anemia DNA repair pathway and its contribution to resistance of type I topoisomerase poisons, a class of commonly used chemotherapeutics. Ultimately she wants to utilize the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of chemoresistance to develop more effective treatment options for patients.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Amin Sobh
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley

Mr. Sobh was very delighted and grateful when he received this award. He felt proud of his accomplishments as a graduate student. Realizing that experts in the field recognize the importance of his work motivates him to work harder and be even more enthusiastic to pursue his research. His research involves identifying cellular components and pathways that affect toxic responses to chemical exposures. The ultimate goal of his work is to better understand the toxicity mechanisms of certain chemicals and reveal the determinants of human susceptibility to such chemicals in order to advance risk assessments of corresponding exposures. In the current study, he investigated the toxicity of acetaldehyde and arsenic trioxide in human erythroleukemic cells. He used a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose disruption alters sensitivity to each of the studied chemicals. His approach identified multiple candidate genes that are potentially involved in the mechanism(s) of toxicity of each chemical. Consistent with the reported role of aldehydes in DNA damage, his work demonstrated that disruption of genes encoding DNA repair enzymes increases the toxic effect of acetaldehyde. His results also suggest a role for mitochondrial fragmentation as one of the mechanisms underlying acetaldehyde toxicity. His study on arsenic trioxide suggested a predominant role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mechanism of toxicity and revealed a novel link between arsenic toxicity and selenocysteine metabolism.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Vivekkumar Dadhania
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS (Pharm)
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM)

It is widely known that low to moderate doses of hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen (APAP), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and thioacetamide (TA) cause minimal liver necrosis in mice and rats. At such low doses, the initiated injury does not expand to cause the organ failure and animal death due to the stimulated compensatory liver regeneration (CLR). At lethal doses however, the initiated injury expands uncontrollably causing liver failure and death of the animals. This expansion occurs even after the offending toxicant is completely eliminated from the body by 8 to 10 half-lives (10h for APAP in mice). This indicates that the continued progression of liver injury at lethal doses of toxicants is not dependent on the presence of toxicants in the body. So how does that injury expand? To the best of our knowledge, entire biomedical literature is silent on what causes the unabated expansion of toxicant-initiated liver injury in the absence of offending toxicant in the body. Therefore, it is worthwhile to identify such mechanisms of liver injury expansion. Moreover, finding out the mechanisms of liver regeneration that can potentially restore the damaged liver to its normal structure and function is equally important to rescue the toxicant-poisoned patients. Mr. Dadhania's thesis work addresses this area of toxicology. He and his colleagues found that Ca2+-dependant hydrolytic enzyme such as secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) get spilt out of the dying cells after lethal dose exposure. The spilt sPLA2 is highly activated by the extracellular high Ca2+ (1.3mM), now termed as death protein, and causes the expansion of APAP-initiated liver injury in mice. This mechanism of injury expansion is independent of the presence of toxicant in the body. Our data indicate that hepatic expression of annexin A1 (ANX1) and annexin A2 (ANX2), the endogenous inhibitors of sPLA2, in the proliferating hepatocytes during the pre­placed CLR in response to liver injury induced by a small dose of TA affords protection against a lethal dose of APAP (TA+APAP treated mice). ANX1 and ANX2 expression on the plasma membrane of the hepatocytes strongly supports our hypothesis of the inhibition of spilt sPLA2-mediated unrestrained destruction of the hepatocytes. We also found that it is timely activation and appropriate termination of the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling that drives well-balanced liver regeneration in the TA+APAP treated mice. Their studies demonstrate that a novel life-saving strategy can be developed by targeting death protein sPLA2 and Wnt/ß-catenin pathway to rescue the APAP-overdosed patients. Mr. Dadhania feels that his graduate studies at the ULM have provided a solid toxicology background with exceptional research training. In particular, he found the hepatotoxicity and liver regeneration research of Dr. Mehendale and Dr. Apte highly intriguing and exhilarating. Soon after his PhD, he looks forward to have an outstanding opportunity to make a successful career as a toxicology scientist and continue his relationship with SOT in whatever manner he can.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Gloria Garcia
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Garcia's research uses the zebrafish model to understand unexplored mechanisms of gene expression. Specifically, she is trying to determine the relationship between a nuclear receptor (AHR), a transcription factor required for proper vertebrate development (Sox9b), and a regulatory RNA molecule (Sox9b-lncRNA) in the context of normal development and under chemical perturbation. Thus far, she and her colleagues have determined that Sox9b-lncRNA is expressed in distinct tissue-specific patterns adjacent to Sox9b, the expression levels and patterns of Sox9b-lncRNA are altered by strong AHR ligands in an AHR dependent manner, and normal Sox9b mRNA expression levels and in situ patterns require the presence of Sox9b-lncRNA. Our data has led to the following hypothesis: The conserved Sox9b-lncRNA is a direct AHR target gene that transcriptionally represses Sox9b upon induction by strong AHR ligands to produce target organ specific toxicity. Her long term career goal is to become an independent investigator running her own laboratory using the zebrafish model and systems biological approaches to identify mechanistic links between chemical exposures, lncRNA regulation, and pathology of disease.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rance Nault
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Mr. Nault's research examines the role of environmental contaminants of the development of fatty liver disease. In order to explore these questions a combination of ‘omic’ techniques is used to examine changes in gene expression regulation, gene expression, and metabolites, and integrate these using a variety of computational tools. Consequently, by using these data together he and his colleagues can look at changes within the context of the whole system. In the future Mr. Nault will delve deeper into key features that were highlighted by these high-throughput evaluations, more specifically on the role of PKM2 in fatty liver caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) which is the research for which this award was given. They found that following TCDD exposure, a change in the PKM isoform is observed which reprograms metabolism similar to that of a cancer cell. Further evidence in metabolite and protein levels demonstrated that the livers of TCDD treated mice exhibit many features of cancer cells despite the absence of cancer. He concludes that this isoform switching likely plays a role in antioxidant defenses. Future work will examine this hypothesis in further depth using genetic models.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jeffrey Willy
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, BM, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Indiana University School of Medicine

Currently a Ph.D. candidate at Indiana University School of Medicine, Mr. Willy studies the role of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) in the progression of NASH. Specifically, he has shown that the UPR regulates both secretion and autophagy through a novel adapter protein IBTKa during the progression of NASH at both the cellular level and in human patient samples. It is his hope to apply his molecular and translational training to better understand preclinical and clinical risk assessment.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kelly Fader
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: Honours Bachelor of Science
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Kelly Fader is a graduate student at Michigan State University and received the Molecular Biology Student Award for her work entitled, "The role of the intestine in TCDD-mediated steatohepatitis in C57BL/6 Mice." Her research investigates dioxin-induced changes along the intestinal tract that contribute to the accumulation of fat and inflammation in the liver. In addition to providing further insight into dioxin-mediated toxicity, and aims to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of complex metabolic diseases. The worldwide prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is continuously increasing, and approaching pandemic levels in the United States. In addition to providing insight into TCDD-mediated hepatotoxicity, these studies may also identify novel targets for the treatment of MetS and its associated metabolic diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dilshan Harischandra
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Iowa State University

Dilshan Harischandra is a graduate student at Iowa State University and received the Molecular Biology Student Award for his work entitled, "Lysosomal Dysfunction Regulates the Release of z-Synuclein Protein Aggregates from Exoomes during Manganese-induced Neurotoxic Insult." This project studied the effect of environmental neurotoxicants in developing and progression of Parkinson ’s disease (PD). His team looked into the interaction of manganese and prominent protein (alpha-synuclein) implicated in PD and studied how manganese exposure will cause protein to aggregate and accumulate in the brain as a result of dysfution in autophagy regulation. Most importantly, they found a possible mechanism via which these mis-folded proteins leave the “sick” cells and enter healthy cells, making them sick too. This mechanism uses very small vesicles to transport these proteins in a cargo-like manner. This could potentially help develop pharmacological strategies to block protein transfer and develop therapies against neurodegenerative diseases.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Aditya Joshi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas Medical Branch

Aditya Joshi is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas Medical Branch and received the Molecular Biology Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for his work entitled, "Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthase 1 mediated homocitrullination of histone H1.2 constitutes a novel epigenetic mark associated with Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor driven gene expression." Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a member of Per/Arnt/Sim family of transcription factor. In canonical AhR signaling upon ligand binding AhR binds to DNA on a site named Xenobiotic Response Element (XRE). We discovered a novel AhR binding site and termed it NC-XRE (Non-Consensus Xenobiotic Response Element). We also identified Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthase 1 (CPS1) as a novel binding partner of AhR at this site upon ligand activation. AhR and CPS1 binding at NC-XRE lead to homocitrullination (a novel posttranslational modification) of linked histone H1. This is responsible for increased Histone H1 mobility as well as transcription activation of various genes. Therefore this study presents homocitrullination as a novel epigenetic mark. He feels that exploring the mechanism, toxicological and physiological role of AhR is important from human health perspective.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Anna Kopec
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Anna Kopec is a postdoctoral scholar at Michigan State University and received the Molecular Biology Postdoctoral Research Award for her work entitled, "Role of Fibrin(ogen) in Hepatocyte Proliferation after Acetaminophen Overdose." Her research is focused on investigating the mechanisms that can help understand how liver repairs itself after acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose. Overdose with Tylenol is one of the most common drug-induced liver injuries in the United States, either via intentional or accidental overdose, since acetaminophen is present in hundreds of over-the-counter and prescription medications. During severe overdose, liver is irreversibly damaged leading to patients’ death. My research focuses on finding out ways to increase liver regeneration that could help save the lives of patients who have overdosed on acetaminophen. Utilization of sophisticated genetic mouse models to exactly pinpoint the role of fibrinogen in APAP overdose will be beneficial in elucidating the mechanism behind liver repair and will potentially highlight novel therapies to stimulate liver regeneration.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Prajakta Shimpi
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: M.Pharm
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island

Prajakta Shimpi is a graduate student at the University of Rhode Island and received the Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award for her work entitled, "Early Epigenetic Modulation of Nrf2 and Lipogenic Genes by PNPP Exposure of Bisphenol A is Associated with Hepatic Steatosis in Female Mice." Her work focuses on plastic bottle component Bisphenol A. She treats pregnant mice with this compound and study the effect on the pups. These pups develop fatty liver, which could be a risk factor severe liver condition. Her work is to detect how exactly bisphenol A affects liver pathways. Interestingly, the effects observed in pups also remain persistent in adult animals, indicating the potential danger these environmental chemicals pose to human health. This work will be published soon and available in public domain for information. Overall, her research focuses on an important area of toxicology- the environmental chemicals, and also on the obesity- fatty liver disease, which is prevalent in population. This certainly contributes to SOT’s mission to creating safer and healthier environment for people.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Natalia VanDuyn
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: ORISE - US EPA

Natalia VanDuyn is a postdoctoral fellow at US Environmental Protection Agency and received the Molecular Biology Specialty Section Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for her work entitled, "Building Predictive Gene Signatures Through Simultaneous Assessment of Transcription Factor Activation and Gene Expression." Her work seeks to develop gene expression biomarkers (lists of genes that are indicative of a cellular process) that predict key events in these adverse outcome pathways. She is currently using genome-wide gene expression data and existing data from the EPA’s Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCast) program to develop biomarkers of key events that are relevant to many human health effects, including cancer. The predictive ability of the biomarker is tested against a large database of other gene expression studies. The methods developed here will allow for novel uses of existing data and can be applied to other key events and adverse outcome pathways. Overall, her research plays a part in developing an approach to predicting the toxicity outcomes of chemical exposure that will allow for faster, cheaper assessment of more chemicals and a better overall view of how they may impact the safety and health of the world.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jill Franzosa
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: U.S. EPA/National Center for Computational Toxicology

Jill Franzosa is a postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. EPA/National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) and received the Molecular Biology Specialty section Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for her work entitled, “RNA-Sequencing Analysis of the Functional Link between Vascular Disruption and Adverse Developmental Consequences.” This research uses whole transcriptome profiling (RNA-Sequencing) to uncover the functional link between embryonic vascular disruption and developmental toxicity. It aims to better understand how environmental compounds can perturb blood vessel formation and vascular remodeling which are fundamental processes for fetal growth and development. These data facilitate the identification of molecular targets of putative vascular disrupting compounds (pVDCs) that can be incorporated into computational models along with high-throughput screening data to predict adverse biological consequences. This research demonstrates the use of robust toxicogenomics methods and bioinformatics techniques to identify molecular events influenced by pVDC exposure. This project incorporates these results into an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework which strengthens the pathway-level information used to relate embryonic vascular disruption to relevant regulatory toxicological endpoints such as reproductive and developmental outcomes. Such information can be used to understand and model the relationship between environmental exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes. This will help to further predict the impact of chemicals on development to evaluate early life stage-specific risks and eventually support regulatory decisions.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tejas Lahoti
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Pennsylvania State University

Tejas Lahoti is a PhD Candidate at the Pennsylvania State University and received the Molecular Biology Student Award for his work entitled, “Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) synergistically induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokine (c-c motif) ligand 20 (Ccl20).” This work is highly innovative as it helps us understand how aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can alter immune regulation. The AHR has been shown to be involved in regulation of immune cells. However, the exact mechanism behind such a regulation is not well understood. He hopes his research will help in understanding how chemokine (c-c motif) ligand 20 (Ccl20)can help in maturation of dendritic cells and Th17 cells.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Xi Li
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BSc
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Xi Li is a graduate student at Texas A&M University and received the Molecular and Systems Biology Student Research Award for his work entitled, “Diindolylmethane (DIM) Analogs as a New Class of NR4A1 Antagonists.” His research was focused on identifying novel chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, he and his team investigated the anticancer effects of small molecules, specifically, the anticancer effects of diindolylmethane (DIM) analogs in colon cancer cells. They found that treatment of these small molecules decreased colon cancer cell survival, proliferation and invasion. In addition they found that these compounds modulated the transcriptional activity of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 and knockdown of NR4A1 by RNA interference resulted in anticancer effects similar to that after compound treatment. It was determined that DIM analogs were inactivators of NR4A1 and their anticancer effects were mediated through inactivation of NR4A1. We concluded that the DIM analogs represented a new class of NR4A1 antagonists. He beleives that better understanding of the molecular mechanisms could not only facilitate development of potent drugs but also avoid the toxicity issues associated with conventional chemotherapy.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Shaun McCullough
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: M.S., Ph.D.
Institution/Affiliation: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Shaun McCullough is a postdoctoral fellow with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and received the Molecular Biology Specialty Section Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for his work entitled, “Ozone Induces Lung Epithelial Cell Inflammation through MAP Kinase Activation without NF-κB Activation.” As an interface between the body and the environment, the airways play an important role as modulators of the body’s response to pollutant exposure. Despite our understanding of the general response of the airway to pollutant exposure, relatively little is known regarding the underlying sub-cellular mechanisms. A small number of studies have previously described ozone responsive mechanisms in cells that do not accurately reflect the function of normal cells of the airway. We examined the sub-cellular events that occurred in primary cells, which are a more accurate reflection of airway cells, following exposure to the pollutant ozone. Through these studies we identified the cellular signaling pathways that are responsible for the pro-inflammatory response of ozone-exposed airway cells. Ozone is a model pollutant and thus we can use data, such as these, to extrapolate the effects and mechanisms of other oxidant pollutants using computational models. Once developed, the application of these models will allow for the prediction of both susceptible populations and strategies for intervention, thus promoting public health.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mary A. Popovech
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: MPH
Institution/Affiliation: New York University School of Medicine

Mary Popovech is a Graduate Student at New York University School of Medicine and the recipient of the Molecular Biology Student Award for her work entitled, “Acute and Subchronic Exposure to Inhaled Silver Nanoparticles Results in Alterations in Gene Expression, Gene-Specific Promoter Methylation, and Mitochondrial Integrity.” The use of engineered nanomaterials is ubiquitous because of how rapidly they are advancing science and technology. Currently, there is a major gap in our understanding of the effects of nanomaterials. Dr. Popovech’s research focuses on elucidating and expanding our understanding of how engineered nanomaterials interact with the intracellular environment. In vitro studies have suggested that exposure to relevant doses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) pose a threat to human health and the assumption that AgNPs are safe by default is now actively being challenged. In vivo studies are needed to fully delineate and either support or refute recent questions and hypotheses raised by in vitro work. Further, there are critical gaps in our understanding of environmental epigenetics, in particular, concerning the existence of epigenetic alterations occurring from exposure to environmental toxicants, as well as, the time points at which these changes occur. Legitimate concerns exist, regarding the potential adverse health effects from NP exposure. Therefore, research that addresses specific critical questions concerning the toxicity and hazards of these technologies is vital to the advancement of the field and the protection of our health and environment. Dr. Popvech’s work has the potential to set standards for consumer products and occupational exposure limits, to safeguard our health.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tongde Wu
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona

Tongde Wu is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Arizona and received the Molecular Biology Specialty Section Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for her work entitled, “p97 Modulates Nrf2-KEAP1-Mediated Antioxidant Response.” Her current research involves a new mechanism of how protein quality control systems coordinate signals with antioxidant response in order to fence against environmental toxicants, such as sodium arsenite. P97 is one of the master regulators of protein folding and quality control within cells. Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is primarily responsible for regulating intracellular redox balancing, the signal can be activated by broccoli extract -- sulforaphane . Studying these two pathways will not only broaden our knowledge in cell defense system, but will also shed light on therapies that eventually improve human heath. As a researcher focusing on mechanism study, she wishes to do more work to explore the principles underlying cellular event. The more we know about the cellular process and how the machinery work, the better it will guide us to design molecules or treatments to battle against the deleterious environmental toxicants that put human health in jeopardy. It is therefore the duty of our generation of toxicologist to apply our skill and knowledge to real life scenario and come up with a cure.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Aditya Joshi
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Texas Medical Branch
Aditya Joshi is a postdoctoral fellow of the University of Texas Medical Branch and the recipient of the Molecular Biology Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for his work entitled, “Transcription Regulation by Novel Interaction of Kruppel-Like Factor 6 with Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor at the NC-XRE.” In this study, he was able to show for the first time the novel interaction between KLF6 and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR). AhR-KLF6 complex may contribute to dioxin-mediated carcinogenesis, particularly given the documented role for both proteins in cell cycle control. Alternatively, the AhR-KLF6 complex may serve regulatory functions unrelated to dioxin toxicity but be critically important in normal physiological events. Hence, genome-wide assessments of the transcriptional targets controlled by this new complex offer a means to address this issue and represent promising research opportunities. He is pursuing a career in molecular toxicology and eventually hopes to become a successful academic investigator.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tejas Lahoti
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Pennsylvania State University
Tejas Lahoti is a postdoctoral student of the University of Pennsylvania and the recipient of the Molecular Biology Student Award for his work etitled, “Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) Regulates Growth Factor Expression, Proliferation, Protease-dependent Invasion and Migration in Primary Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.” His research involved using numerous molecular biology techniques to understand role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Lahoti hopes to mentor undergraduate students to take up toxicology as a field of interest.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Xiao Pan
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University
Xiaao Panis a graduate student of the Michigan State University and received the Molecular Biology Student Award for her work titled, “Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of the Dynamic Signaling Network Mediating Proinflammatory Response in the Spleen of Mice under Deoxynivalenol-induced Ribotoxic Stress.” Her work involves finding out how a common food contaminating natural toxin causes toxicity in the immune system. She employed a large-scale approach called proteomics to profile protein modification changes that are indicative of cellular signaling. Research results provide information regarding the molecular mechanisms of this toxin, how such protein modification leads to the toxicity in the immune system of experimental animals, and eventually how to design mechanism-based strategies to counter and prevent the adverse consequences of this toxin in humans. Such systems biology methods could be used to understand the toxicity pathways of chemicals in human cell cultures, and in combination of pharmacokinetic models, employed for new paradigm of risk assessment. She is interested in pursuing a challenging position in the industry where she could apply toxicology knowledge and training to issues of product safety and public health.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

 

Recipient: Vincent Ramirez
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Connecticut
Vincent Ramirez is a graduate student of the University of Connecticut and the recipient of the Molecular Biology Student Award for his work entitled, “TNIP1 Regulates the Cell Stress Response through Repression of Heat Shock Proteins A6 and A1A.” His research examined the potential roles TNIP1 plays in regulating the cell stress response in keratinocytes. TNIP1 was found to play key roles in repressing TNFalpha signaling and the activity of nuclear receptors PPAR and RAR. Increased protein expression of TNIP1 resulted in reduced levels of several heat shock proteins mRNA and protein, including HSPA6 and HSPA1A. His work showed that the TNIP1-mediated inhibition of HSP expression decreased cell survival in response to heat stress. He hopes that his work now, and in the future, can contribute to reducing or refining the use of in vivo models and to generating a more predictive in vitro model. While he does not think that there will be a suitable replacement for in vivo models, he believes better in vitro models could be a first line of testing many toxicants.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Ley Cody Smith
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Florida

Ley Cody Smith is a second year graduate student at the University of Florida and has received the first place award for his work entitled, “Effects of GPER Activation on (xeno) Estrogen-Induced Cellular Responses.” The focus of his work involved understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for mediating the cellular responses to xenoestrogren exposure in order to identify potential therapeutic targets to xenoestrogren mediated diseases. He used a combination of functional genomic and global phosphoproteomic approaches to determine the potential for nuclear and membrane-bound estrogen receptors to engage in receptor crosstalk once activated by xenoestrogen binding with the overall goal of deciphering the cellular consequences of these interactions. Mr. Smith considers the field of phosphoproteomics as it relates to toxicology to be the next frontier in systems biology for understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for adverse effects caused by exposure to environmental contaminants. His goal is to pursue a career in the academic or government field so that he can help to better protect human health and the environment, bridge the gap between the policy makers and the researchers, and streamline the process from discovery to public policy.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Durga Tripathi
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Biosciences & Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center
Durga Nand Tripathi is a postdoctoral fellow of the Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A & M Health Science Center. He received the Molecular Biology Postdoctoral Fellow Research Award for his work entitled, “Reactive Nitrogen Species Regulate Autophagy through ATM-AMPK-TSC2-mediated Suppression of mTORC1.” His research involves nitric oxide (NO), which is an important signaling molecule involved in many physiological processes. NO in excess, however, causes nitrosative damage with pathological consequences. He identified a new pathway by which nitrosative damage induces autophagy, a self-digestion process for degradation and recycling of cellular molecules that participates in both cell survival and death pathways. These data identify nitrosative stress as an attractive therapeutic strategy to repress oncogenic mTORC1 signaling and induce autophagic cell death. He hopes to join the Molecular Biology Specialty Section in SOT, which he believes is a very good platform to interact, collaborate, and solve this puzzle.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Britton Goodale
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University
Britton Goodale, of Oregon State University, for his work entitled, “Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Distinct mRNA Expression Profiles in Developing Zebrafish.” His research is focused on characterizing diverse molecular mechanisms by which PAHs cause toxicity, using the embryonic zebrafish, which is an ideal model for investigating mechanisms of developmental toxicity. Using AHR-null zebrafish, he is investigating the role of the AHR in toxicity-induced by a diverse group of PAHs. He is also utilizing mRNA microarrays to identify novel differential pathways of toxicity and biomarkers of PAH exposure. He hopes to continue conducting research that furthers our understanding of mechanisms of developmental toxicity, as well as provide mentorship and encouragement to young scientists interested in this important field.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Indira Jutooru
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BVSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University
Indira Jutooru, of Texas A & M University, for his work entitled, “STAT3 Regulation by Sp Transcription Factors in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.” His work is focused on STAT3 and Sp protein transcription factors and their role in pancreatic cancer. As a scientist working in the cancer field, he feels there is lot to explore in regards to identifying the mechanisms and/or in development of better drugs with low toxicity. His primary goal is to study cancer development, various pathways involved in carcinogenesis, and contribute his part in the development of chemotherapeutics with lowered toxicity that can help patients with various cancers.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kristy Kutanzi
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: National Center for Toxicological Research, Oak Ridge Research Institution for Science and Education
Kristy Kutanzi, of the US Food and Drug Administration, for her work entitled, “Epigenetic and miRNA Dysregulation in Liver Nongenotoxic and Genotoxic Tumorigenesis.” Her research aims to identify those events that are important for cellular transformation. This is crucially important for understanding the mechanisms of cancer progression and prevention. It is her hope that this award will draw further attention to the need for research in this field, and will bring researchers together to share their expertise to improve our understanding of the early events which drive cellular transformation. Ultimately, these collaborations will expand our research potential and enable us to identify early biomarkers that can be used to guide cancer detection and prevention strategies.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Laura MacPherson
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MSc, BMSc
Institution/Affiliation: University of Toronto
Laura MacPherson, of the University of Toronto, for her research entitled, “2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin-Inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase is a Negative Regulator of Dioxin-Induced Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Transactivation and a Mono-ADP-Ribosyltransferase.” Her research examines an enzyme called TiPARP, which is currently an uncharacterized protein that belongs to a family of enzymes that only now is being better understood. The primary goal of the research was to describe the role of TiPARP in aryl. She hopes that her contributions towards the science of toxicology will provide a better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in environmental chemical exposure and methods and interventions by which these pathways can be inhibited.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Hong Loan Nguyen
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
Hong Loan Nguyen, of Pennsylvania State University, for his work entitled, “Peptide-Mediated Translational Regulation of Human Microsomal Epoxide Hydrolase (EPHX1).” The major scope of his research project deals with the regulation of microsomal epoxide hydrolase, at the translational level by upstream open reading frame (uORF) peptides. This enzyme is important in that it helps detoxifies many harmful foreign compounds as well as toxic metabolites produced by the body. However, this enzyme is also noted for its bioactivation ability such as converting cigarette smoke components into reactive cancer-causing metabolites. He hopes to continue partaking in advancing science in general and the science of toxicology specifically through his research work. By discovering the unknown, he wants to ensure his research will help toxicologists be more aware of the complex processes involved in regulating detoxification enzymes.

Molecular and Systems Biology Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Tanos
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
Rachel Tanos, of Penn State University, for her research entitled, “The Ah Receptor Exerts a Regulatory Role in Hiomeostatic Control of Cholesterol Synthesis.” We have established the role of the Ah receptor in the repression of the cholesterol synthesis pathway through a cognitive response element independent manner both in mice and humans. This award represents appreciation of a full year of hard work and demonstrates to her that she is already contributing to the advancement of science in her field and that she is on the right track. She will pursue interesting science with high impact and it would be her turn to help other young scientist in their pursuit of their goals.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Tarana Arman
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Washington State University

Ms. Arman felt that receiving this award from PANWAT was a very humbling and special moment. She feels very fortunate for being able to present her research to the erudite audience. Platform presentations can be very unnerving. At PANWAT this year, she had the opportunity to listen to some really great presentations. This award will help Ms. Arman by boosting her confidence to participate in more events. PANWAT also helps her to widen her network of researchers to improve communication and knowledge around her toxicological research. This monetary award will help Ms. Arman to take part in the next conference.

Ms. Arman's research primarily focuses on studying an at-risk population-people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and an environmental toxin, microcystin. NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States (affects 30% of adults) and has a significant global prevalence (up to 25%). NAFLD is also significantly associated with chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Current trends of global warming and anthropogenic activities have led to an increase in blue-green algal blooms in freshwater; these blooms produce toxins like the microcystins. Microcystins are established hepatotoxins and can also cause renal toxicity. The primary route of exposure to these toxins is through oral consumption of contaminated water and fish. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and CKD have overlapping mechanisms with microcystin toxicity. With the increasing frequency and size of algal blooms and the increasing prevalence of NAFLD, the intersection of these two factors is an important area of study in toxicology. Ms. Arman's research focuses on the mechanistic understanding of how a diet-induced NAFLD condition interacts with microcystin toxicity to produce liver and kidney pathologies. She is positive that her research will contribute towards understanding the differential exposure and toxicity of harmful environmental components for at-risk populations. Ms. Arman's current project is looking into the hepatic recovery mechanisms after MCLR toxicity, but with a continued exposure to a poor diet. Immunohistochemistry and plasma biochemistry results suggests that continued stress from a poor diet following MCLR exposure impairs the hepatic recovery mechanisms, and presents an advanced NASH stage.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Kelley Bastin
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Mrs. Bastin was quite shocked and extremely excited that she was going to be receiving this award since this was her first time attending a regional SOT conference. This award will help her pursue her research goals further and dive deeper into understanding polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Mrs. Bastin’s research evaluates the role of metabolism in the susceptibility of chemically-mediated toxicity and respiratory disease in human bronchial cells caused by a type of air pollutant known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). PAHs are contaminants released into our environment from incomplete combustion processes such as wood-burning and cigarette smoke. When PAHs are inhaled, cells metabolize them into reactive metabolites that can cause mutations and alterations of gene signaling leading to tumor growth. This study looks specifically at the metabolites produced from exposure to PAHs and analyzed the metabolic capacity of human bronchial cells (HBEC) cultured in 3D as a model to study the toxicity of PAHs. Her future goals are to measure the metabolic enzyme activity that produces these reactive metabolites by activity-based protein proteomics to correlate with our gene expression data and metabolism studies. This will help to determine the relevance of in vitro 3D culture models for studying chemical toxicity in the lung.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Yvonne Chang
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Chang was so excited for her work to be recognized by the PANWAT regional chapter. She was also very thankful of the PANWAT chapter for its encouragement to graduate students and trainees. The funds from this award will support her travel to the SOT Annual Meeting.

Ms. Chang's dissertation research uses in vitro and bioinformatics approaches to link 3D human bronchial epithelial gene expression to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cancer risk values in an effort to identify potential regulators of toxicity. Using a coexpression network analysis approach, she identified gene sets significantly correlated to relative potency factors (RPF) that include cell adhesion and cell cycle genes. Through benchmark dose modeling at the gene and pathway level for cells treated with benzo[a]pyrene, she has also identified cell cycle regulation and DNA damage as among the most sensitive gene sets to exposure. After she finishes her dissertation research, she is interested in careers in predictive and investigative toxicology where she can further work with organotypic in vitro models and develop her skills in interrogating complex data.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Anna Chlebowski
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Western University of Health Sciences

Dr. Chlebowski was surprised to learn that she had won the award, and very proud. This is a project she has been involved in for a couple of years, and one that her PI has been working on for decades. Making a contribution to such a substantial project, and having that contribution be recognized, is always a good feeling.

This research project is working to understand how exposure to chemicals early-in-life, while the brain is still developing, can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, Dr. Chlebowski was looking at a neurodegenerative disorder called Guam Parkinson-Dementia Complex (PDC), found in the South Pacific. First she needed to develop a model system, which involved generating stem cells from samples taken from PDC patients and healthy controls, and then using the stem cells to generate neural stem cells and neurons. Once Dr. Chlebowski generated the stem cells, she was able to start exposing them to toxins and see how that impacted the development of neurons, or other types of cells found in the brain.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Subham Dasgupta
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Dr. Dasgupta was absolutely pleased to have received this award for his platform presentation. He expressed that it was a really great feeling to be recognized by peers within his field. This award will provide him with encouragement and financial support to attend the SOT conference.

Dr. Dasgupta's research interests lie in unraveling mechanisms of early developmental toxicity of common environmental contaminants. Eventually, he wants to set up a research program and establish himself in developmental toxicology. Within the research presented here, he investigated the mechanisms of developmental toxicity of the flame retardant TDCIPP and showed that TDCIPP exposures within zebrafish embryos result in transcriptomic and epigenetic disruptions during an early developmental window that lead to defects in germ layer structure and organogenesis.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Joseph Dempsey
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Mr. Dempsey's research is focused on understanding how the gut microbiome interacts with the host liver during development and how exposure to toxic environmental chemicals may negatively impact this interaction to increase the risk of diseases in adults. Currently, he is working on integrating multiple high-throughput datasets to explain the persistent effects of chemicals on the gut microbiome and liver. During postnatal development, coinciding with the maturation of host signaling pathways, there are profound changes in the composition and functions of gut microbiome. Gut microbiome produces distinct microbial metabolites including short-chain fatty acids, which are known histone deacetylase inhibitors. At adult age, mice exposed early in life to the former flame retardant BDE-99 showed persistent changes in gut microbiome composition, short-chain fatty acids, as well as transcriptomic changes in the liver. These persistent changes initiated by neonatal exposure to BDE-99 could ultimately alter the metabolic and detoxification capacity of the adult liver.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Matthew Gomez
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Mr. Gomez was filled with gratitude and joy upon receiving this award, knowing that his investment in this project was recognized and rewarded. It feels nice to know that his research is going in the right direction and getting this reward is additional assurance for him to continue and finish this project. The money will be used mainly as part to pay his rent, as he is working a part time job right now to fulfill all his housing needs. This award will allow Mr. Gomez, even if a little bit, to spend more time in the lab and finish this project.

Mr. Gomez's work focuses on the gut microbiome which is an emerging field where it's increasingly recognized as a key player in toxicological responses and a plethora of diseases such as inflammation, metabolic syndromes, and cancer. He conducted a lot of wet lab work with the assistance of his P.I. and colleagues while learning statistic models and programs in order to analyze his data. More specifically, the project Mr. Gomez undertook serves to bridge the gap between proven responses in acute models by conducting an experiment meant to highlight the persistent effects of the three chemicals mentioned above in the gut microbiome. Knowing this, we may be able to identify how composition variation may influence different pathways and diseases outcomes in animal models. Mr. Gomez believes that working in this lab has provided him the tools he will require in order to become a great scientist. He plans to apply for a PhD program in immunology/bacteriology in order to hopefully start his own lab dedicated to cancer research and immunotherapy.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Natalie Johnson
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University / University of Kansas Medical Center

Upon receiving this award, Ms. Johnson was shocked. She could not believe that research she did over the summer in her home town was impressive to other researchers. This was her first poster presentation and she can see now that everyone was a lot more impressed by her presentation than she had assumed. The money will help Ms. Johnson continue to present at various conferences and pursue more research opportunities while continuing to support herself. At her undergraduate institution, she is not paid for her research and awards such as this one allow her to continue to use her time to do this research while not having to worry about finances.

Ms. Johnson did research over the summer of 2019 at The University of Kansas Medical Center in the department of Toxicology and Pharmacology in order to prepare for a future in research or medicine. This summer research is what she had presented at PANWAT and the research for which she has won this award. Her research involved the Aryl Hydrocarbon receptor and liver fibrosis. This project was an extension of a project at Boise State University with Dr. Kristen Mitchell. At Boise State, researchers are studying the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and its role in the mediation of TCDD-induced hepatotoxicity. TCDD is a persistent environmental toxicant in which toxicity is mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (Ahr) which functions as a ligand activated transcription factor. When bound to TCDD, its ligand, it can dysregulate extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis and cause fibrosis, or scarring. The Mitchell Lab created knockout mice and Ms. Johnson's project looked at the comparison of the cotreatment of TCDD and CCl4 in the wildtype and knockout mice. It was observed that the initial injury, inflammation and hepatic stellate cell activation were decreased in the knockout co-treatment as compared to the wild-type co-treatment. All of these alterations should lead to decreased fibrosis, however unexpectedly fibrosis was the same and thus she looked at Hyaluronan in these mice. Hyaluronan is used in maintaining tissue homeostasis however is persistent in chronically wounded tissue and thus contributes to scarring. It was determined that hyaluronan was decreased in the co-treatment knockouts compared to the co-treatment wild-type mice. This matched the inflammation, initial injury, as well as the HSC activation done by the Mitchell lab and thus Hyaluronan was not deemed the cause of HSC activation. It was determined through gelatinase activity that gelatinases (and possibly other remodeling enzymes) must be responsible for the similar degree of fibrosis seen between both co-treated genotypes.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Sarah Kobernat
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: Boise State University

Ms. Kobernat is proud to be an active member of SOT and PANWAT.

Ms. Kobernat's previous work focused on the role of the AhR in the progression of liver disease. Her research recently pivoted to RNA aptamers and DNA origami.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Yvonne Rericha
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Rericha was extremely happy and grateful to receive this award. It was an incredibly beneficial experience presenting her poster at PANWAT. Everything she learned while presenting her poster and discussing her project with viewers will help her to continue to develop as a researcher and communicator of science.

Ms. Rericha is testing the toxicity of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, persistent compounds that are often found in materials that one wants to repel both water and oils. She is currently using zebrafish to investigate how toxic these chemicals are and what biological pathways they affect. Additionally, she wants to determine whether there are trends in chemical toxicity based on the structure of the chemicals. Ms. Rericha won this award for the poster that she presented on the set-up and methods for this research. She is looking forward to continuing this research and further developing as a toxicologist.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: David Scoville
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Dr. Scoville was surprised and excited to receive this award. It will help him pursue his research in that the opportunity to have his work recognized provides excellent motivation.

Dr. Scoville is using integrative bioinformatic approaches to study the toxicity of the formerly used flame retardants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The project he won this award presenting was focused on early life exposures and persistent transcriptional changes in xenobiotic, intermediary metabolism, and epigenetic modifier genes that may help explain how PBDEs could impact risks for diseases/adverse health effects in adulthood.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Prarthana Shankar
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State Univetsity

Ms. Shankar was excited and incredibly happy upon receiving notice of this award. She is a very nervous public speaker, but has been working on improving her presentation skills with the help of her PI and lab. She was glad that their hard work paid off.

Ms. Shankar is investigating the toxicity of a class of chemicals called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs that society is exposed to via vehicle exhaust, for example. Upon exposure, several molecular events take place which then lead up to toxicity. The goal of her research is to understand which of these events are important for toxicity and if she can identify certain molecular signatures that could indicated PAH exposure. In the future, Ms. Shankar would like to work in chemical regulation or safety, to provide the data for safety of a specific chemical.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Lindsay Wilson
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Wilson was excited and grateful to receive the award and it gave her confidence to continue sharing her work and improving her presentation skills. She was given helpful feedback from conference attendees that has helped her formulate ideas and improve her research since returning to her university.

The work that resulted in this award is on the importance of experimental conditions in high-throughput chemical screening, particularly when using the zebrafish early life-stage screening platform. In the future, Ms. Wilson would like to use the zebrafish model to better understand epigenetic changes resulting from exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in PAH toxicity, including epigenetics.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Tarana Arman
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Washington State University

Ms. Arman believes that a very integral quality of a successful scientist is to be able to speak about their research with confidence. More importantly, it should be conveyed in a way that the general mass can understand. These were the two primary attributes she aimed to inculcate in her presentation when she was notified that she would be discussing her work in a platform style. This was her second year attending the PANWAT conference. Platform presentations can be such an unnerving experience, but everyone present was very encouraging to her. Receiving the award was a very humbling and special moment. She absolutely enjoyed presenting her work in front of the erudite audience. The conference also presented her with an opportunity to listen to and learn about other interesting researches on-going in the field of toxicology. This award helped her by boosting her confidence to participate in more events. Every time she is involved in an event like this, her understanding of her own research grows deeper. This monetary award will help her to take part in the next conference.

Ms. Arman has always enjoyed sharing her knowledge with her coworkers for better ideas, which ultimately strengthens her knowledge bank. Her ultimate career goal is to become an expert in the fields of liver and kidney molecular toxicology to better predict and mitigate these toxicities. The overall premise of her research work is to elucidate the mechanisms of microcystin-LR (MCLR) toxicity in populations with preexisting liver and kidney diseases. The preexisting disease condition that she is looking into is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the United States, with almost 40% of the population suffering from it. NAFLD is defined as the accumulation of excessive fat in the liver of patients, without a history of excessive alcohol intake. If unchecked, a fatty liver progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). An estimated 17% of the US adult population have NASH. Evidence suggests that exposure to environmental toxicants can cause fatty liver and/or drive NAFLD progression to NASH (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE)). In addition to NAFLD, chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a significant health burden and shares some of the similar risk factors associated with NAFLD. A meta-analysis report reported a two-fold increase in CKD in association with NASH. Similar to what is known regarding the role of toxicants in NAFLD progression, some environmental factors have been implicated in kidney toxicity (e.g. bisphenol A). For both NAFLD and CKD, there is more research needed into the role of other environmental toxins play in the severity and progression of these diseases. Microcystin-LR (MCLR), is an extremely stable and persistent toxin produced by the cyanobacteria blooms (blue-green algae). These blooms are ubiquitous in surface water and thrive under favorable conditions. Liver and kidney are the primary and secondary target organs affected by MCLR. Her research focuses on investigating the role of MCLR in the progression of NAFLD and CKD. For her presentation at PANWAT 2018, she discussed about the mechanistic link(s) between MCLR kidney toxicity and the development and progression of CKD in the context of NASH.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Brynne Coulam
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Boise State University

Ms. Coulam did not expect to receive an award, and she felt very honored. She is investigating how estrogen-modulating activity of intestinal bacteria may influence melanoma development.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Josi Herron
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Ms. Herron was very encouraged to receive this award. She was happy to be recognized for her research efforts and ability to communicate her results to a large audience. This award will allow her the opportunity to attend future meetings, such as SOT, where she can continue to share her research and receive feedback from peers in the field.

Ms. Herron's work involves investigating the effect of commonly used disinfectants against brain development. She has shown that these disinfectants are capable of altering the production of cholesterol, which is an essential molecule for proper brain development. The research she was given the award for was focused on looking at global gene expression changes in brains of mice that were exposed to the disinfectants during gestation. This work demonstrated for the first time that these disinfectants can enter the fetal brain and alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, indicating that these disinfectants might have detrimental effects on brain development.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Celine Huynh
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Huynh was surprised to receive the "Best Undergraduate Research Poster Presentation" because she had never presented her research to professionals before. She had just completed a majority of her research the summer of 2018 and had presented for the first time at a research symposium a month prior. She is very grateful to have had the opportunity to attend PANWAT for the first time and to be able to work under Dr. Susan Tilton. She is excited to continue working in the Tilton lab and completing her undergraduate thesis.

Ms. Huynh's summer research focused on the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemicals on barrier function in 3-dimensional human primary bronchial epithelial cells collected from normal and diseased donors. Both diseased and normal donor cells were treated with chemicals and evaluated for barrier function, cytotoxicity and gene amplification. Cells were then imaged using a confocal microscope. In the future, her research will focus on oxidative stress in 2-dimensional cells. She will potentially assess the role of sulforaphane to modulate NRF2 targets NQO1 and GSTP1 in normal and diseased human bronchial epithelial cells. In the future she would like to complete her undergraduate thesis by spring 2020 and earn her minor in toxicology. She plans on becoming a certified nursing assistant and attending graduate school in the future.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Sarah Kobernat
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: Boise State University

Ms. Kobernat was so glad she had the opportunity to share her research and that people understood it. She is a third year grad student who does research on the role of Ah receptor activation in the progression of liver disease. She hopes to continue in the field of toxicology upon graduating.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Michael-Andres Mans
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Mr. Mans was very excited because he had not yet had the opportunity to attend an SOT conference. He conducted this research as a part of his undergraduate thesis and he looks forward to being able to present his research and advertise himself to potential future employers.

Mr. Man's research analyzes how a class of ubiquitous contaminant, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, affects gene expression by indirectly interacting with DNA. PAHs result from the combustion of any organic matter are are comprised of over 1500 compounds. Many PAHs are carcinogenics or may become carcinogenic by metabolism in the body. This study looks specifically at the dysregulation of a class of RNA transcripts called miRNA in 3D human lung cell cultures in response to PAH exposure. miRNA can inhibit or delay the translation of genes into proteins, altering gene expression which may contribute to the progression of carcinogenic PAH toxicity.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Rebekah Petroff
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Dr. Petroff was excited and grateful for the wonderful organizers and volunteers of her regional chapters. This award is helping to fund her trip to SOT this year, allowing her to attend a conference across the country. As she is getting towards the tail end of her tenure as a graduate student, she is looking forward to the opportunity to catch up with other toxicologists that she has met over the years as an SOT member, and participate in special events, such as the infamous "Chat with an Expert," and socials for groups like Women in Toxicology and the Neurotoxicology Specialty Section.

Dr. Petroff's research is focused on understanding how low levels of toxins may cause subtle neurological damage with chronic exposure. For this award, she presented research on how domoic acid, a specific marine algal toxin, can cause damage in the white matter tracts of adult brains that can be measured with MRI technology. This research is incredibly important because it touches on how the environment around us can affect the organ that makes you, you. In the future, she is looking forward to incorporating more data science into the field of neurotoxicology. She wants to use technology, big data, and machine learning to better understand exposures, disease, and ultimately protect the neurological health of people around the world.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Shivakumar Rayavara Veerabhadraiah
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Boise State

The inspiration and confidence Mr. Veerabhadraiah got after wining the award was priceless.

The long-term goal of Dr. Mitchell’s lab is to find a selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) modulator to reverse, prevent, or limit the development of liver fibrosis. Mr. Veerabhadraiah's PhD thesis work focused on investigating the cellular role of AhR during liver fibrosis using Cre-Lox based cell-specific knockout mice (in vivo) and human hepatic stellate cell lines (LX-2) (in vitro). The goal of this project was to knock down AhR expression in either hepatocytes or HSCs to determine how these cells contribute to the development of fibrosis in TCDD-treated mice.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Courtney Roper
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State University

Ms. Roper was very honored to receive this award as there was some very exciting and well designed studies at the regional SOT meeting. Her research looks to better understand air pollution and improve regulations to protect human health.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: David Scoville
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington

Dr. Scoville was surprised and delighted to receive this award. It will help to support him during his training.

Dr. Scoville is working to understand the effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on host metabolism and the role of the gut microbiome using genomic and metabolomic approaches. PBDEs are former flame retardants that persist in the environment and bioaccumulate such that humans are exposed routinely through dietary sources including meat and dairy products. He hopes to continue researching the toxicological effects of environmental contaminants in the future using these powerful techniques as they continue to advance and provide additional mechanistic insights.

Pacific Northwest Toxicology Development Fund

Recipient: Prarthana Shankar
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: Oregon State Univetsity

Ms. Shankar was pleasantly surprised and excited on hearing that she received this poster award! She would like to thank her advisor Dr. Robert Tanguay, and all her lab mates and collaborators who not only helped with this project, but also helped put the poster together. She will use the funds from this award for future conference expenses.

Ms. Shankar is interested in understanding the mechanisms of action of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of organic pollutants that humans are exposed to via burning reactions (like, vehicle exhaust, cigarette smoke, grilling food, etc). She use the zebrafish model to investigate the downstream molecular processes that take place on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation by these PAHs during development. She is currently working on understanding the role of long non-coding RNAs (RNA molecules that do not code for protein) in PAH developmental toxicity. Her poster for which she won this award explained a large PAH toxicity screen that they conducted, and how they selected "representative PAHs" and are working with transcriptomic data to define, evaluate, and classify PAH toxicity.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Zhenzhen Shi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Emory University

Dr. Shi was truly excited to receive this award. She has many years of research experience in the fields of applied dynamical systems and computational modeling of disease progression. Since she joined Dr. Zhang's group at Emory, under his supervision she has started to use mathematical and engineering approaches, acquired from her past experience, to work on identifying the mechanisms and effects of environmental chemicals. Dr. Shi's confidence in working on this area is enhanced by this award.

Dr. Shi's current research focuses on using mathematical, statistical, and computational methods to explore the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. For her future research, she is interested in unraveling the complexities of human health under environmental exposures, with a particular emphasis on modeling cellular/molecular mechanisms of biological responses to environmental exposures/infections. In this work, she constructed a mathematical model to describe essential thyroid hormone regulation in the human. By incorporating the thyroid profile data set in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey into the model, Dr. Shi used statistical methods to generate parameter distributions. Each combination of parameter values drawn from the parameter distributions can represent an individual in a virtual human population. The model can take both parameter values from the distributions and thyroid testing data from experiments to predict altered hormone profiles for a human population.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Honesty Tohon
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MSc, MPH
Institution/Affiliation: University of Montreal

Mr. Tohon reacted with joy and gratitude. The emotion is linked, on the one hand, to the fact that he comes from very far away (Benin) and on the other hand, to the fact that the awards of SOT are very competitive. He dreamed of this since the beginning of his doctoral training at the University of Montreal without being sure to get it one day. However, Mr. Tohon kept his faith in a job well done. After his Master in Environmental Health at the School of Public Health of the Free University of Brussels (Belgium) where he had obtained very good results, he had the opportunity to pursue a thesis in this field. But Mr. Tohon started to take a great interest in toxicology and risk assessment at this time. He had given up this thesis possibility in Brussels to enroll in Montreal. Biological modeling, the specialty in which his doctoral research is integrated, was totally new to him at the start. This SOT award is a kind of confirmation that Mr. Tohon has managed to distinguish himself in this area. He would like to express his gratitude to his research directors (Professor Sami Haddad and Dr. Mathieu Valcke) and to Dr. Andy Nong for the confidence placed in him and the resources made available to him to carry out his doctoral research works. During Mr. Tohon's stays in their respective laboratories, they transmitted to him the love for computational toxicology. He is grateful also to the members of the BMSS of SOT who recognized in his work a great merit. This award encourages him to strengthen his skills and to continue research in toxicology, as much as possible, with methods of computational toxicology, with a view to contribute to reduce or avoid the use of laboratory animals.

Mr. Tohon's doctoral research focuses on the study of the impact of multi-route chemical co-exposures (case of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) on the interindividual variability of the fate of individual substances in the human body. Additionally, his research is also focussed on the interpretation of biomonitoring data for these chemical compounds in the human body. To do this, biological modeling approaches are used to assess exposure to mixtures of volatile organic chemicals in the context of human biomonitoring of environmental chemicals in Canada (CHMS). The techniques for reconstructing external exposure from biomonitoring data in adult subpopulations have been refined and proposed to interpret these data on VOCs reported by Health Canada in various subpopulations of different ages. Mr. Tohon's future short-term goals will be based on improving the interpretation of biomonitoring data for other mixtures of volatile organic chemicals using biological modeling. The research for which he obtained this award consisted in developing a biological modeling approach to reconstruct individual exposure in air to toluene from data relating to one of its urinary markers (BMA) reported by Health Canada in Canadian individuals, and to propose a method that could help to quantify the uncertainty associated with the interpretation, according to the developed approach, of biological spot measurements collected during the national health surveys.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Axelle Marchand
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Université de Montréal

Ms. Marchand was really happy to receive this award. She put a lot of time and effort into this project and winning such a prize was the best reward for that work. It will help her to hold on through the thesis writing process.

Ms. Marchand's work aims to evaluate the potential effect of worker's exposure to heat on the absorption of chemicals through breathing and the resulting levels in the body. This data can provide a better understanding of how to correlate biomonitoring values and chemical concentrations in the workplace in order to better protect people. According to her results, a temperature of 30 degree celcius (WBGT) would cause increases in blood concentrations of volatile organic solvents. Body weight and composition seem to have an impact on these observations, suggesting toxicokinetics in obese subject would be more affected.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Yi-Hsien Cheng
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine (ICCM), Kansas State University

Dr. Cheng was excited and grateful upon being informed as a recipient of the "Biological Modeling Specialty Section Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Endowment Award." She feels it is a great honor, and pleasure to get to know and be recognized by scientists sharing similar research interests and by scientists from various research fields as well. Her career goal is to become an independent investigator in academia, research institute, or industry. The recognition provided by this award will greatly help her to pursue excellence in future research and to achieve her career goals.

Her research is related to construct physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict external-to-internal dosimetry of nanomaterials in target tissue/organ and to conduct probabilistic risk assessments with anticipation to gain further insights into the in vivo pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and risk of nanomaterials. Detail of the awarded study: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used in various biomedical fields, therefore, there is great concern regarding their potential for toxicity. Systemically understanding the pharmacokinetics of AuNPs is critical in their design, application, and risk assessment. A membrane-limited physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating multiple administration routes including intravenous, oral gavage, intratracheal instillation, and endotracheal inhalation of various sizes of monodisperse AuNP ranging from 1.4–200 nm was developed to predict uptake, disposition, and elimination of AuNPs in adult rats. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to identify key determinants governing tissue distribution for individual administration route. In addition, multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to gain deeper insights into relationships between the characteristics of AuNPs and biodistribution parameters. This integrated and comparative analysis of published comprehensive pharmacokinetic data of AuNPs in rats provides a basis for species extrapolation and realistic risk assessment involving in multiple exposure pathways.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Marie-Emilie Willemin
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD, PharmD
Institution/Affiliation: US FDA/NCTR

Dr. Willemin was very excited and honored to receive this award, especially because her work was rewarded by the Biological Modeling Specialty section in relation to my field of expertise (computational modeling). As a young researcher, receiving such a prestigious award by her peers is very rewarding in light of all her efforts and commitment towards the research project as a postdoctoral fellow. For the team, the award recognizes the interest among members in the field in the methodology and the outcomes of our research topic. The award will definitely highlight the ongoing and future research of the lab. And it has already helped her to pursue her career goals in research as she takes her next career step from a postdoctoral researcher to a research scientist. The objective of the project is the evaluation of the effects of a mixture of environmental chemicals (e.g., perchlorate, thiocyanate), on the thyroid system of pregnant women and her fetuses. Pregnant women are sensitive to thyroid perturbations which could lead to thyroid hormone insufficiency. This is a health concern due to the key role thyroid hormones play in the neurodevelopment of the fetus. She and her team chose to model mechanistically the various modes of action of the global mixture of these thyroid-active chemicals, found in food, drinking water, or cigarette smoke, as the scenario of co-exposure is a more realistic one. Specifically, in this work, we modelled the different mechanisms of action of thiocyanate on the thyroid system in rats, in addition to the development of a PBPK model for thiocyanate in rats and its extrapolation to humans. In the future, the thiocyanate mode of action model will be extrapolated to pregnant women and integrated with perchlorate dose-response model in pregnant women developed earlier in our lab.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Worley
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS, MA
Institution/Affiliation: CDC/ATSDR, University of Georgia
Ms. Worley's research applies in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation to develop a a PBPK model for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the rat that includes physiological descriptions of transporter kinetics in the kidney. PFOA exhibits sex-specific clearance in the rat. This is thought to be primarily driven by hormonally regulated expression of organic anion transporters (OATs) on the apical and basolateral membranes of the proximal tubule cells. Her model includes in vitro-derived descriptions of these transporters and successfully simulates time-course serum, liver, and urine data for intravenous (IV) and oral exposures in both male and female rats. Thus, this work supports the hypothesis that sex-specific serum half-lives for PFOA are largely driven by expression of transporters in the kidney and contributes to the development of PBPK modeling as a tool for evaluating the role of transporters in renal clearance. Future work will apply this method to develop a PBPK model for PFOA exposure in humans that includes physiologically-based descriptions of kidney transporters.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jeremy Leonard
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD, MS, BS
Institution/Affiliation: US EPA
Jeremy Leonard is a postdoctoral scholar at the US Environmental Protection Agency and received the Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award for his work entitled, "Development of a Conceptual Module to Investigate Pharmacokinetic Influences when Evaluating Chemicals in Adverse Outcome Pathways." This work involves examining the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of chemicals to which an organism may be exposed and relating this to high-throughput results derived from analyses of thousands of chemicals simultaneously. This, in turn, provides a framework that aids in prioritization of chemicals whose mode of action at a molecular target is generally considered to be the initiating step of a series of events that lead to adverse apical endpoints. He wishes to demonstrate the need for caution in interpretation of such high-throughput results as well as to apply other means of high-throughput testing, such as computational predictive models.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Axelle Marchand
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Université de Montréal
Axelle Marchand is a postdoctoral scholar at Université de Montréal and received the Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Award for her work entitled, "Evaluation and Modeling of the Impact of Co-Exposures to Voc Mixtures on Urinary Biomarkers." The objective of the project was to evaluate if chloroform could interact with others volatil organic compounds (i.e. toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene) following inhalation exposure and how it would affect biomonitoring data. Therefore they exposed human volunteers to different combinations of solvents to adapt existing models for urinary excretion of metabolites and to validate those models. They proved to be very accurate in predicting parent compound levels in blood and exhaled air and metabolites in urine. Those models could be useful in interpreting biological data in large scale biomonitoring studies. She thinks chemical mixtures will always be of interest because it will always exist. PBPK models are great tools to evaluate many toxicological issues. Possibilities seem to be unlimited. She would like to be a pioneer in modeling, to explore those unlimited possibilities and to share them.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Huali Wu
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences
Huali Wu is a PhD candidate at The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences and received the Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award for her work entitled, “Can the Association between Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Delayed Menarche Be Explained on the Basis of Physiology and Pharmacokinetics?” Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluorocarbon (PFC) compound that has been widely used as surfactants in industrial and consumer products. A recent epidemiological study reported that higher serum concentrations of PFOA were associated with delayed menarche in girls living in Mid-Ohio Valley. Since the concentrations of PFOA in this study are considerably lower than those associated with toxicological effects in animals, this association may not be causal. PFOA has a half-life of about 3 years, it is expected that growth dilution and the development of a new route of excretion through menstrual cycling can affect PFOA kinetics. Therefore, the role of physiological changes during puberty in the reported association need to be investigated prior to causal inference. Dr. Wu and her colleagues applied a Monte Carlo Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic (MC-PBPK) model of PFOA to assess whether and how much of the observed association between PFOA and delayed menarche was caused by the changing pharmacokinetics during puberty. They found that variations in PFOA kinetics due to growth dilution and an additional excretion route associated with menstruation may underlie the reported relationship between serum PFOA levels and age at menarche. In addition, their study demonstrated the feasibility of a MC-PBPK modeling approach to assess whether and how much of the apparent epidemiological association can be explained on the basis of pharmacokinetic variability rather than an effect of the chemical itself.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Zhoumeng Lin
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MB
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia
Zhoumeng Lin is currently a PhD student of the University of Georgia and received the Perry Gehring Student Award for his work entitled, “Gestational and Lactational Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for the Herbicide Atrazine in Rats: Development and Optimization.” According to Mr. Lin, the focus of his research is on the neurotoxicity of the herbicide atrazine and the development of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for atrazine in rodents across different age spectra, from fetal to adult stages. In the work that he presented, he and his lab group developed PBPK models of atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. Model predictions provide insights into designing and interpreting early life toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies with this herbicide and the development of these models is very necessary because the developing nervous system is much more sensitive to atrazine than adult nervous system and none of the existing developmental toxicity studies of atrazine correlates internal fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry with the points of departure. Mr. Lin is working to revise his manuscript and expects to publish it in a prestigious journal in the field of toxicology shortly. In addition, this award is a significant asset to his curriculum vitae and he hopes this award will help him obtain a postdoctoral position in the field of toxicology.

Perry J. Gehring Biological Modeling Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kathleen Holm
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD, MS, BS
Institution/Affiliation: US Environmental Protection Agency
Kathleen Holm, of the US Environmental Protection Agency, for her research entitled, “Identifying the Sources of Uncertainty in the Process of Reconstructing Exposures to Carbaryl Using Exposure-to-Dose Modeling.” In this study, the sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a rapidly eliminated chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using an exposure model, Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), and a human physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl in food and drinking water for 365 days. Using these time-concentrations profiles as inputs to the PBPK model, biomarker (1-naphthol in urine) time course simulations were produced. These simulated biomarker data were then used to reconstruct an average daily carbaryl intake under various conditions. We found that additional exposure information is needed to successfully reconstruct exposure to carbaryl. She wants to continue to use computer modeling to simulate scenarios, allowing one to test hypothesis and design experiments up front. Though, not all questions can be answered using in vitro data and simulation alone, these tools will impact fewer animal studies over all. Her research uses computational modeling to characterize the sources of uncertainty in exposure reconstruction. Determining the parameters that drive the uncertainty informs the type of data we need to collect in order to more efficiently conduct risk assessment.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Juliana Agudelo Areiza
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Rhode Island, College of Pharmacy

Ms. Agudelo Areiza was honored to receive the Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award. This award will enable her to attend the Society of Toxicology meeting for the first time as a graduate student. As a result, she will have the opportunity to showcase her work, network with and learn from incredible toxicologists from all over the world. Furthermore, it will serve as a platform for her to mentor and inspire undergraduate students to be involved in the field of toxicology.

Ms. Agudelo Areiza is currently getting her PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences with a concentration in Pharmacology and Toxicology. Her research focuses on investigating the impact of perinatal exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These are a group of synthetic environmental toxicants known to cause adverse health effects. This award was granted to her based on her research of how low dose perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) exposure alters various gene pathways as a result of placental transferase in PFOS-diet exposure C57BL/6 mice. Ms. Agudelo Areiza intends to continue investigating how PFASs play a role in developmental- and neurotoxicity.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Jessica Jimenez
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ms. Jimenez was honored to receive the Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award. It made it possible for her to attend the 2019 Society of Toxicology Meeting for the first time as a graduate student. This was a truly valuable experience where she was able to expand her research network, learn from incredible scientists in the field of toxicology.

Ms. Jimenez is getting her PhD in Toxicology, focusing on how environmental contaminants can affect brain health. She was given this award based on her research exploring the activation and function of macrophages, immune cells in the body, upon stimulation with bacteria and chemical exposures. Ms. Jimenez hopes to continue investigating the neurotoxic potential of environmental contaminants and their effect on neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Kimberly Rivera Caraballo
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: Undergraduate Student
Institution/Affiliation: University of Puerto Rico at Humacao

Kimberly Rivera Caraballo, currently an undergraduate student at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) at Humacao, received the Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her abstract titled, “The Expression of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter mRNA During Methylmercury.” Her study investigates neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more specifically on transporters that are responsible for taking up extra glutamate—an amino acid neurotransmitter— from the nervous system. It focuses on understanding how methylmercury, an environmental neurotoxicant, causes the inhibition or inactivation of these transporters, leading to cell death. Ms. Caraballo is expected to graduate from UPR at Humacao in 2018 and is in the process of applying to graduate toxicology programs. Ms. Caraballo was happy to receive the award because of the opportunity to return to the SOT Annual Meeting as a peer mentor, after attending for the first time in 2017 as an Undergraduate Diversity Program participant.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Kaylin White
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Spelman College

Kaylin White is a graduating senior at Spelman college and plans to attend graduate school in 2017. Ms. White received the 2017 Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her abstract titled, “Investigating the Effects of Berry Flavored Electronic Cigarette Liquids on Airway Epithelial Cells.” Her study focuses on the potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of six berry flavored electronic cigarette liquids (e-liquids). She also investigated a flavored chemical constituent called Furaneol (4-Hydroxy-2,5-dimetyl-3-furanone) because of its extensive use in the food industry, but lack of investigation in the context of e-cigarette exposures. Ms. White was an Undergraduate Diversity Program participant at the 2015 SOT Annual Meeting and said she had never been exposed to a field that had such an abundance of diverse career options. She was immediately inspired to pursue toxicology as a career since. She also gave a platform presentation at SOT 2016 on “ILCs in the Mediation of Type II Immunity in the Lungs of Mice Repeatedly Exposed to Ozone.”

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Lizbeth Perez-Castro
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: Undergraduate Student
Institution/Affiliation: University of Puerto Rico at Cayey

Lizbeth Perez-Castro, an undergraduate student at University of Puerto Rico (UPR) at Cayey, received the 2016 Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her abstract titled, “Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Changes in Response to Methylmercury-Induced Toxicity in Motor Neuron-Like Cells, NSC34 Cells: The Role of Dimethyl Fumarate in Neuronal Protection.” Ms. Cayey’s research, conducted at Michigan State University, focuses on how Methylmercury (MeHg) causes mitochondrial dysfunction affecting motor neuron (MN). Furthermore, a hybrid cell line was used as a MN cell model to compare the concentration-dependence of cytotoxicity and to determine if the impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential is involved in MeHg-induced MN toxicity. Ms. Perez-Castro was also an Undergraduate Diversity Program participant at the 2015 SOT Annual Meeting. After graduating in 2016, she would like to pursue a doctorate degree in neurotoxicology.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Latisha Pryor
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: Undergraduate Student
Institution/Affiliation: Fort Valley State University

Latisha T. Pryor, a graduating senior at Fort Valley State University, was awarded the 2015 Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her abstract titled, “An Analysis of Varskin 5.0 Radiation Dosimetry Software.” Her research assessed the accuracy of beta dosimetry software, Varskin 5.0, which was distributed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to help hospitals keep radiation exposure rates as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Varskin 5.0 estimates ionizing radiation dose to layers of the skin resulting from hot-particle exposure. Ms. Pryor, who is an aspiring radiation oncologist, said attending the 2014 SOT meeting as an Undergraduate Diversity Program participant allowed her to network with professionals experienced in computational toxicology. Furthermore, learning about radiation safety at the meeting inspired her to become a student engineer with the NRC’s Radiation Protection Branch and subsequently introduced her to this research.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Pamella Tijerina
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: New York University School of Medicine

Pamella B. Tijerina, a PhD student at the New York School of Medicine, received the 2014 Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her abstract titled, “Gene Expression Alterations in the Brain Elicited by Inhalation of Silver Nanoparticles.” Her research evaluates the effects of inhaled AgNPs on gene expression within distinct sub regions of the brain under diverse exposure terms. The results of her study demonstrate that inhalation of AgNPs can result in oxidative stress and gene expression alterations which could contribute to neurotoxicity and potentially neurodegeneration. Ms. Tijerina was an Undergraduate Diversity Program (UDP) participant at the 2011 SOT Annual Meeting, where she discovered how interdisciplinary and toxicology could be and decided to pursue it as a career. This is where she also met Judy Zelikoff, her current advisor, and speaker at the 2011 UDP.

Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award Fund

Recipient: Alexandra  Colón-Rodriguez
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Michigan State University

Alexandra Colón-Rodriguez, a PhD student at Michigan State University, received the 2013 Perry J. Gehring Diversity Student Travel Award for her paper titled, “Low Dose Postnatal MeHg Exposure Alters mRNA Levels of Rat Brainstem Glutamate Receptors and Voltage Gated Calcium Channels.” Her research is focused on identifying the effects of MeHg on gene expression of calcium permeable ion channels to know if it can be contributing to the physiological alterations observed after MeHg exposure. Understanding if changes in gene expression are contributing to cell death can contribute to the understanding of MeHg mechanism of toxicity. Ms. Colón-Rodriguez was a 2009 Undergraduate Diversity Program participant and credits the experience as a motivation for pursuing toxicology as a career.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Durgesh K. Dwivedi
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER) S.A.S. Nagar

Mr. Dwivedi was really excited and pleased when he received this prestigious award. He immediately shared the good news with his PhD advisor and also thanked him for his support and encouragement. The award will help Mr. Dwivedi to get recognition in the Society of Toxicology, which is very crucial for a research career. This award has not only given a positive impact on him, but also highly recognized his research.

Mr. Dwivedi's research involves elucidating the molecular mechanism of liver toxicity in rats induced by liver toxicants. Especially involving the role of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant signaling in counteracting these toxicities. In conclusion, drugs that either reduce the inflammatory condition, or increase the anti-oxidant status, deserve further attention for the development of new drugs to treat liver disorders following the same mechanism.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Colette Miller
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: US Environmental Protection Agency

Research awards are crucial to the professional development of trainees. Endowment awards such as the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Award provides the opportunity for young scientists to craft their scientific message and provide networking opportunities for early career researchers. Dr. Miller recognizes that being a recipient of a SOT endowment award not only establishes name recognition with leaders in the toxicology field but also documents evidence that their work is of high scientific quality and value. Both of these are invaluable, particularly during the transition from postdoc to an independent scientist. Dr. Miller was truly honored to have been named the 2020 recipient of the Perry J. Gehring Best Postdoctoral Fellow Endowment Award from the Risk Assessment Specialty Section. While she believes that her research has important implications for risk assessment, it is incredibly validating to know that senior leaders in this field believe so as well and further, that we are asking the right questions.

What we are exposed to during gestation, even acutely, may have long-lasting health effects on ourselves and our children. The purpose of D. Miller's postdoctoral program at the US EPA has been to investigate how air pollutants may contribute to this. In just a few short years, they have provided some of the first studies demonstrating biological plausibility behind the relationship between maternal ozone exposure and fetal growth restriction reported in observational studies. They have now begun to extend this work into the characterization of metabolic disease risk in the offspring when they are adolescents. In the work that was recognized by the Risk Assessment Specialty Section, they report that offspring from rats who were exposed to ozone during their pregnancy show susceptibility to the effects of an unhealthy diet, high in saturated fat. Further, we detail how these risks differ between male and female offspring, with males showing a vulnerability to high blood cholesterol and fat storage and females being more prone to liver dysfunction. Together, this data suggests that prenatal exposure to ozone predicates postnatal metabolic sensitivity to environmental stressors such as diet. Dr. Miller's career goals are to continue in this important research area by characterizing the long-term health impacts of air pollutants on future generations. Her interests lie in investigating the mechanisms that link the exposure of inhaled pollutants on adverse pregnancy outcomes. And further, study how such exposures program the developing offspring for increased susceptibility to cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. She is extremely grateful for the support of her mentors, both near and far, who have shown considerable trust in her abilities as a junior investigator. And she looks forward to being able to continue in their paths, providing similar guidance and encouragement for the next generation of scientists.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Tara Catron
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: ORISE at US EPA

Dr. Catron is honored to have been selected as the recipient of the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Best Postdoctoral Fellow Abstract Award. This award will inspire her to continue trying to identify how the microbiome influences chemical toxicity and how it can be considered in risk assessment practice.

Host-associated microbiota are all of the bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi that colonize a host organism. Microbiota are a dynamic system that play important roles in early development and physiology. It is hypothesized that they can 1) bioactivate or detoxify chemicals or 2) be targeted by chemicals. Current risk assessment practice does not have the potential to fully evaluate the role of microbiota in mediating adverse effects of chemical exposure, highlighting the potential for mischaracterization of hazard or misestimation of exposure risk. The lack of understanding of how chemical-microbiota interactions might influence toxicity is one of the many knowledge gaps that still exist when assessing health risk of chemical exposure. Dr. Catron’s research uses colonized and microbe-free zebrafish in a unique experimental system to explore whether chemical exposure alters microbial community structure and function leading to secondary adverse effects on the host. Related to this award, her research describes a novel observation showing an inverse relationship between host developmental toxicity and microbiota disruption in larval zebrafish following developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and multiple replacement compounds. She showed that BPA alternatives that produced significant zebrafish developmental toxicity did not disrupt host-associated microbiota, while BPA or BPA alternatives that disrupted microbiota either failed to produce toxicity or were far less potent developmental toxicants. Overall, this research supports the concept that the microbiome is an important factor and potential biomarker for characterizing the health effects of environmental chemicals. After completing her postdoctoral training, Dr. Catron is interested in pursuing a career in industry or government where she can analyze and evaluate potential risks due to chemical exposure.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Laura Ewing
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Ms. Ewing was pleasantly surprised to hear that she had received the award. It made her want to include more in the poster, and to work harder to finish her degree in four years.

Her thesis research is focused on elucidating the mechanisms behind the interaction of dietary methionine and the gut microbiome on intestinal health after radiation, especially in terms on normal tissue toxicity during cancer treatments. It is becoming more and more accepted and studied that the human's microbial profile plays an important role in overall health. In her poster presented at the SOT Annual Meeting, she described her and her team's findings so far in a mouse model of dietary methionine plus radiation, as well as the physiological-based pharmacokinetic model that she is developing for methionine exposure that will be used to estimate risk of gastrointestinal toxicity after radiotherapy. After school, she would like to continue working in the modeling field, perhaps with creating models of risk assessment for environmental toxicity.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Fabian Grimm
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Dr. Grimm felt honored having been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Best Postdoctoral Abstract Award. Selection for this award by the Risk Assessment Specialty Section is strongly motivating, as it is not only reflective of the quality of his research, but it is an affirmation that he can make a meaningful impact in the field. His research focuses on advancing chemical safety evaluations through biological read-across and inter-individual variability assessments using high-content screening of organotypic in vitro models. Currently, the implementation of such models is impeded by the lack of testing strategies that are amenable for (1) inter-individual susceptibility assessments and (2) extrapolation of in vitro data to physiologically-relevant exposure levels. His SOT abstract summarizes one of his team's projects that addresses these two key challenges using a population-based cardiotoxicity model. After completing his postdoctoral training, he is interested in pursuing a career either in industry or academia.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Abhishek Venkatratnam
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BTech, MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina
Mr. Venkatratnam is deeply honored to be the recipient of this award. His doctoral research focuses on evaluating and characterizing population-variability in responses to trichloroethylene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and a known human carcinogen. In addition, provide mechanistic underpinnings on the molecular events driving differences in TCE toxicity. The award recognizes the current findings of this study and its relevance to risk assessment for which he is very grateful. One of the many challenges in toxicology is addressing human variability in adverse effects with exposure to agents. Traditional toxicity testing of chemicals is routinely performed in a single strain of rodent for dose-response assessment and to derive toxicity values, a key aspect in the risk assessment framework that aids in the regulatory decision making processes. The goal of this study is to provide experimental data by evaluating the quantitative extent of variability in toxic responses in a genetically-diverse mouse population and also characterize the mechanistic underpinnings driving such responses by incorporating genetic data. The findings from this study provide mechanistic evidence on variability in TCE toxicokinetics and also demonstrates a novel feedback loop between PPAR signaling, an adverse outcome pathway in rodents, and oxidative metabolism of TCE. My long-term goal is to become a toxicologist and conduct research relevant to risk assessment either in academia or industry.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Marjory Moreau
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Health Canada

The use of computational modeling can help interpret and integrate in vitro screening data and biomonitoring results to improve the prioritization of chemicals in risk assessment. There is still work needed to improve at making these toxicity screening results more relevant to human exposure and risk assessment. The work of Dr. Moreau and colleagues will be used to assist in developing predictive tools and informing the utility of non-traditional toxicity data for Health Canada assessment of chemicals. The general population is exposed to many chemicals that can have various possible health effects. Levels of exposure of a population to these chemical or their metabolites can be surveyed using biomonitoring data. Despite the usefulness of this data, it is sometimes difficult to interpret the levels of exposure in a risk assessment context. The past few years, advances in toxicity testing methods such as systems biology and high-throughput screening have brought new ways to assess the potential harm from chemicals. Margin of exposures between endpoints and exposure levels can be used to bridge the data generated from these new toxicity methods and effectively screen biological activities into a common measure. The purpose of my research is (1) to estimate exposure from biomonitoring levels in the population using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for flame retardants (hexabromocyclododecane, HBCD) and (2) to compare human equivalent dose metrics based on in vitro and in vivo endpoints from high throughput screening assays (HTS) results.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Brittany Weldon
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington School of Public Health
Ms. Weldon's research focuses on assessing the risk of adverse health effects from exposure to silver nanoparticles by various exposure routes. Additionally, her research investigates the potential for silver nanoparticles to interact with sensitive organ systems such as the developing central nervous system and reproductive system. This award will help her continue in these endeavors and with the broader goals of applying toxicological sciences to improve human and environmental health.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Marjory Moreau
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Health Canada

Marjory Moreau is a postdoctoral scholar at Health Canada and received the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Award for her work entitled, "Comparison of phthalate biomonitoring and high throughput screening data using pharmacokinetic modeling." Her research focused on the development of approaches by which high throughput screening data and toxicogenomics can be used for chemical evaluations, in addition to identifying useful tools that can be used to address data-poor chemicals.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mylene Ratelle
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Montreal
Mylene Ratelle is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Montreal and received the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Award for her work entitled, "Time Courses and Variability of Biomarkers of Exposure to Pyrethroids in a Group of Agricultural Workers." The aim of this study was to characterize typical urinary time courses of biomarkers of cypermethrin exposure in 34 agricultural workers in Quebec to better assess within- and between-subject variability, according to different professional tasks. Documenting time courses also aimed to assess appropriate sampling strategies for routine monitoring. Within-subject variability in biomonitoring data and between-subject variability in concentrations or rates were assessed for the 3-day work shifts were also estimated. Founding were that 12% of workers showed profile descriptive of an high occupational exposure. Between-subject factors associated with higher metabolite levels were the main professional task and farm size. According to the work, a good strategy for routine biomonitoring was suggested to evaluate the range of occupational exposure. She would like to focus herwork on the study of the effects of chronic exposure to environmental contaminants in humans, as well as the applicability of this knowledge and the implementation of hygiene measures and supervision of use in a perspective of decreasing risk for population. She feels link between science discovery and applicability is often thin and would like to help to strengthen it.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rachel Church
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institute for Drug Safety Sciences

Rachel Church is a PhD candidate at The Hamner Institute for Drug Safety Sciences and she received the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Best Postdoctoral Fellow Abstract Award for her work entitled, “Doxorubicin-Induced Glomerular Injury is Associated with MicroRNA Alterations in the Rat.” The project focused on identifying microRNA (miRNA) based biomarkers that are released into the urine in response to glomerular renal injury. Her goal is to participate in collaborative research projects that will reduce the liability of a xenobiotic to precipitate organ injury in the human population. Currently her major research focus centers around identifying microRNA biomarkers that show increased sensitivity and specificty for early detection of drug-induced organ injury. Identification of these markers may allow for the early termination of unsafe compounds, hastening the development of safer alternatives. Additionally, because microRNAs are highly conserved between species, these biomarkers may be translatable to use in the clinic. This line of work may lead to the development of a biomarker that is sensitive and specific for glomerular injury that can be utilized during nonclinical testing. Validation of a miRNA biomarker may not only aid in the drug development process but will additionally be useful in assessing the potential of any xenobiotic exposure to precipitate damage to the glomeruli.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Mia Johansson
Award Year: 2014
Current Degrees: Master of Science in Biotechnology Engineering
Institution/Affiliation: Work Environment Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet
Mia Johansson is a graduate student at the Institute of Environmental Medicine at Karolinska Institutet and received the Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award for her work entitled, “Does Industry Take the Sensitive Subpopulation of Asthmatics into Account when Setting Derived No-Effect Levels under REACH?” According to the European Union´s chemical legislation, Registration Evaluation Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), all registered substances that are manufactured, imported and used in quantities of 10 tons or more per year should have a health benchmark defined as the Derived-No-Effect Level (DNEL). The DNEL represents an exposure level below which no adverse health effects in humans are expected. The DNEL values are aimed to protect both the working and the general population, including some sensitive subpopulations (e.g. people with pre-existing diseases) toward chemical exposure. There are about 300 million people worldwide suffering from asthma and they may constitute a sensitive population in relation to exposure to airborne chemicals. In this study, she and her team evaluated the inclusion of asthmatics in the DNEL setting process and if asthmatics are protected by the DNEL values. Their results suggest that few documents on chemicals include data on asthmatics and that this group may not be protected by the DNEL values. This suggests that availability of data on asthmatics should be carefully examined in the development of DNELs, and that the lack of such data should be explicitly noted for respiratory irritants. Further guidance from ECHA on how to address sensitive subgroups in DNEL setting may improve the consistency of DNEL values. She believes the relatively large subpopulation of asthmatics (~5-10% of the world population) deserves to be protected against chemical release in both emergency and occupational settings and that these studies will contribute to a safer and healthier world.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Virunya Bhat
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California
Virunya Bhat works for NSF International and received the Perry J. Gehring Best Graduate Student Award for her work entitled, “Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conzaole-induced Liver Effects in Mice.” Current approaches to assessing potential human health risks resulting from exposure to environmental chemicals are time and resource-intensive. Incorporating newer data types, such as toxicogenomic data, can make the risk assessment process more efficient, feasible, and less reliant on animal testing. Grouping related chemicals and conducting chemical class-based risk assessment is also more efficient than a chemical-by-chemical risk assessment. Her project examined five members of the same chemical class using a combined approach that integrates newer, toxicogenomic data with traditional toxicity data. She and her group reached similar conclusions after a 30-day chemical exposure compared with risk assessments conducted using a traditional approach based on the results of two-year animal studies. She wants to continue her efforts to identify more efficient and feasible methods to assess potential human or environmental health risks of industrial chemicals.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Merrie Mosedale
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes
Merrie Mosedale, who works at The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, received the Perry J. Gehring Best Postdoctoral Fellow Abstract Award for her work entitled, “Safety Assessment of a Novel Antibiotic Using a Mouse Population-Based Approach Predicts Risk of DILI in Humans Where Classical Models Fail.” The work for which she won this award is the outcome of a unique partnership between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. She and her team described the use of an inbred, laboratory mouse diversity panel to effectively predict the liver injury liability of a new drug candidate in clinical trials where classical rodent models had failed. She and her colleagues also tapped into the broad genetic diversity and extensive genetic characterization of this mouse population to perform genome wide association mapping to identify those genes that underlie DILI susceptibility. The work they conducted highlights the potential for population-based approaches to improve human risk assessment in drug-safety testing as well as to provide mechanistic insights into drug toxicity. She believes that her award is instrumental in allowing her to share her research with other scientists in the field. She hopes to gain valuable feedback and insight to help move the project forward.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Michelle DeSimone
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: North Carolina State University

Michelle DeSimone, of North Carolina State University, for her abstract entitled, “A Systems Genetics Approach to Investigating Cancer Susceptibility Due to Low-Dose Co-Exposures to Environmental Carcinogens.” Human exposure to environmental carcinogens often occurs as complex mixtures at low doses, and such interactions between individual compounds may contribute significantly towards human cancer risk. As a result of the award presentation, she initiated new collaborations with individuals involved in risk assessment, and importantly gained additional mentors for her future research career. She envisions that her role in advancing the science will come in three parts: First, the continuation of strong, innovative research that contributes to filling significant knowledge gaps in risk assessment. Second, the development of risk-based decisions that drive the regulatory changes needed to overcome such challenges. Third, the role of a mentor who trains young toxicologists urging them to take on the challenges of tomorrow.

Perry J. Gehring Risk Assessment Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nicholas Heger
Award Year: 2012
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Brown University

Nicholas Heger, of Brown University, for his abstract entitled, “Interspecies Approach to the Assessment of Human Susceptibility to Phthalate-Induced Endocrine Disruption.” His lab is interested in understanding how human exposures to toxicants can disrupt fetal development of the testis, and possibly result in subsequent disease in later childhood or early adulthood. Previous work with phthalate esters by many researchers has shown that rats exposed in utero to these chemicals exhibit substantial decreases in testosterone during development, while mice exhibit no overall suppression. The species specific differences in response highlighted the importance in understanding how the human might respond. Accordingly, Heger developed a rodent-based xenograft bioassay, where we surgically implant fragments of human fetal testis collected from spontaneously aborted fetuses, and then expose the rodent host to phthalates to examine cellular and molecular changes which occur in the human testis xenograft. He wants his next steps to be to transition to clinical toxicology. His plan is to take a two-year internship with the American Association for Clinical Chemistry at Children's Hospital Boston.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Burnett
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Ms. Burnett was thrilled to be a recipient of the RSESS Graduate Student Excellence Award. This award allowed to travel to and present her research at the 2019 SOT Annual Meeting. She was excited to share this research with the scientific community, and in turn, to gain feedback to advance both this research and her career in the future. Additionally, this award allowed her an invaluable opportunity to network with scientists and potential employers within her research specialty and beyond. By meeting and talking with other scientists about her research, she received diverse ideas for improvement and future direction, crucial for ensuring that each detail of the research project is fully considered and impactful. Again, she was thrilled and thankful to be a recipient of the RSESS Graduate Student Excellence Award and the invaluable opportunities it granted her to advance her research and career.

Current risk assessment approaches are hindered by poor understanding of population variability in response to xenobiotic exposure. Understanding the extent of inter-individual variability is critical in avoiding unexpected pharmaceutical toxicities and in ensuring that regulatory limits of environmental chemicals are protective of sensitive subpopulations. Ms. Burnett's research focuses on a population-based in vitro model using human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to assess cardiotoxicity hazard and estimate toxicodynamic population variability. This type of model is critically important in improving safety evaluation of both pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical compounds. Her long-term research interest is to advance risk assessment by utilizing and developing alternative methods for safety evaluation. Her career goal is to become a toxicologist in industry and practice human health risk assessment.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Yi-Hsien Cheng
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Kansas State University/Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine (ICCM)

Dr. Cheng was surprisied but grateful to receive this award. This award is prestigious and affirms her work in the fields of computational toxicology, regulatory, and safety evaluation as well as helps get recognized by senior researchers, which will greatly help her pursue her research in relevant fields.

Currently Dr. Cheng is establishing and implementing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to estimate internal dosimetry as well as biodistribution of nanoparticle in rodents and humans following various systemic administrations. By using this computational technique together with safety evaluation and risk assessment approaches, optimum dosing regimen of nanomedicine can be proposed. Her career goal is to become an independent investigator in either academia, research institute, or industries. The above-mentioned PBPK modeling frameworks capable of predicting distribution in normal target tissues, delivery efficiency to tumor cells in tumor tissue, as well as potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo following systemic administration will form the basis of her future research. The present work represents the beginning of her long-term research plan.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Wei-Chun Chou
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine (ICCM), Kansas State University

Dr. Chou was honored to receive this award. The current work is the beginning of his long-term research plan. This award will help him a lot to realize his research plan and career goal.

Dr. Chou's project has great scientific significance and will lead to great impact in the field of regulatory toxicology and safety evaluation. Firstly, the effort in the development of the PBPK model in mice, rats, monkeys and humans based on comprehensive toxicokinetic experiment from animal and human studies can reduce the uncertainty of dosimetry extrapolating from animals to human, and potential to improve the quantitative risk assessment for PFOS. Secondly, by integrating the Bayesian analysis and MCMC algorithm, the uncertainty of interspecies differences in model parameters were well characterized to create more reliable model for interspecies extrapolation to humans. Finally, the modeling results in terms of adequate convergence, valid posterior parameter distribution and well agreement with experiment data, providing the support to reduce the uncertainty of derivation of health-based toxicity values (e.g., RfDs) extrapolated from animal studies. The future goal of this project is to provide a foundation for establishing this risk assessment framework for PFOS and extend to other perfluoroalkyl compounds if sufficient toxicokinetic data are available.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Sarah Faure
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Health Canada

Ms. Faure was very honored to have been chosen to receive the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section Graduate Student Excellence Award as this prize was a great recognition of her work. It allowed her to participate to the SOT annual meeting to present her work in a poster session. Presenting her research results allows her to gain unique experience in knowledge transfer and communication, while demonstrating scientific rigor. She was pleased to have the opportunity to discuss and interact with internationally renowned scientists working in the field of toxicology and benefited from valuable feedback and advice on her work to be published. It also provided her with a major networking and contact opportunity with future potential partnerships on this project, or projects to come. It also contributed to her training by allowing her to familiarize herself with the various research at the forefront of toxicology carried out around the world.

Ms. Faure is working with the Nationnal Biomonitoring Section of Health Canada (Government of Canada) which is a recognized departmental, national, and international pioneer and leader in human biomonitoring. Her work consists of interpreting human biomonitoring data in a health risk based context, as well as participating in writing the fifth biomonitoring report of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Her future goals are to stay in the biomonitoring field to work on and discover new aspects of the interpretation of data from this approach, participate in improvement of tools to analyze monitoring of chemicals in the environment, and to communicate around this subject to make it more accessible to public health workers and researchers in toxicology. The specific project for which she was selected aims to interpret CHMS biomonitoring data in order to assess population exposures in a health risk based context using biomonitoring screening values, such as biomonitoring equivalents or human biomonitoring values (HBM). These values are derived in order to identify chemicals for which the population exposure is likely to be near or above existing guidance values. In this study, an inventory of available biomonitoring screening values was developed and some of them were updated and then compared with the most recent national biomonitoring data from the CHMS to identify priority chemicals. This list of identified chemicals can be used as a starting point for further analyses such as the assessment of exposure sources or the identification of subpopulations that may be at increased risk of exposure and health effects. This screening exercise can also help to target risk management actions and focus efforts to find solutions to reduce or eliminate exposure and associated health risks.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Samantha Faber
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Dr. Faber was thrilled to win this award based on her translational research to both the regulatory and non-regulatory sector. This award will help her to pursue her career goals as a molecular toxicologist.

Her research is focused on development and characterization of a novel in vitro model of the airway for the purpose of investigating lung physiology and disease. Her future goals are to assess the influence of the stroma in manifestation of lung disease and dysfunction. Her research into utilizing this novel transepithelial exposure model to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of inflammation and oxidative stress within airway fibroblasts was commended by receiving the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation SS Postdoctoral Excellence Award.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Miao  Li
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD, Master of Medicine
Institution/Affiliation: Institute of Computational Comparative Medicine/ Kansas State University

Dr. Li was happy and excited to receive the award. It is a recognition for his research from the Specialty Section and SOT. He feels it will enhance his motivation and encourage him in his future research. It will also help him to achieve his future career goal to become an independent researcher for transferring data from mechanistic research into policy.

Currently, his research is using the physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to avoid drug residues in animal-derived food. The computational modeling tool could help to predict the drug concentration in edible tissues after drug administrations, and to determine the slaughter time to ensure food safety. His career goal is to become an independent researcher to apply data from in vitro and mechanistic research into risk assessment and policy making. He and his colleagues established a PBPK model with physiologically based mammary gland in dairy cows. This model has the potential to predict drug depletions in milk to ensure milk safety and avoid extra economic loss for dairy farmers.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Yu-Syuan  Luo
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M

Mr. Luo was thrilled to be recognized by the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section for his work related to metabolism and toxicity of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Receiving this award has increased his confidence in doing research, and gives him extra momentum to embrace the next challenge. This award makes him understand that mechanistic research in toxicology is critical in regulatory and safety evaluation of chemicals. In the future, he would like to learn more in vitro and in silico skills. Combined with his experience in mechanistic animal studies, he foresees himself as an expert in regulatory toxicology. Again, he would like to show his gratitude to his mentors, Drs. Ivan Rusyn and Weihsueh Chiu, and his labmates who helped in this study. This would not happen without their help!

His research focuses on investigating the inter-individual variability in metabolism and toxicity of trichloroethylene(TCE) and tetrachloroethylene(PCE). The inter-individual variability in metabolism and toxicity may result from the differential expressions of metabolic enzymes, different disease states, age, and sex. In this study, she and her team studied a critical enzyme that is involved in oxidative metabolism of TCE and PCE, Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). They wonder if people with different enzyme activities of CYP2E1 can lead to differences in metabolism of TCE and PCE, and further cause differences in toxicity of TCE and PCE. Their results show that CYP2E1 plays an important role in the oxidative metabolism of TCE and PCE, and could also affect glutathione conjugative metabolism of TCE. The alteration of metabolite levels in target organs further show different toxicities across tested strains---wild-type, Cyp2e1 knockout, and humanized CYP2E1 mice. Her future goals are to (1) directly compare the toxicokinetics of metabolites between the structurally similar chemicals, TCE and PCE; (2) investigate the influence of disease states on metabolism and toxicity of PCE; (3) study the inter-individual variability in metabolism and toxicity of PCE by using collaborative mouse populations; (4) implement modeling skills to simulate the internal dosimetry of critical metabolites from oxidative and GSH conjugative metabolism, and provide the extrapolation estimates from animals to humans; and (5) probe the metabolomics of TCE and PCE treated mice by using non-targeted analytical technique, such as ion mobility mass spectrometry, two dimensional GC-MS, and/or NMR based analysis. Ultimately, she would like to refine the in vitro to in vivo extrapolation that is critical to the health risk assessments of environmental chemicals.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jalissa Nguyen
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Wisconsin-Madison/ILSI North America

Dr. Nguyen's reaction upon receiving this award was astonishment! She is honored that to be selected as one of the recipients for this award by researchers in the field of regulatory toxicology and safety evaluation. This travel award will help her to pursue her research by covering the costs associated with travel to the SOT Annual Meeting and allowing her to share her findings with leaders in the field of regulatory toxicology and safety evaluation. By sharing her research at this meeting, she hopes to start a conversation about the utility/applicability of alternative testing methods in the scope of food safety and the field of toxicology.

This work is a summation of an intense 12-week fellowship with the International Life Sciences (ILSI) North America. The objective of thsi summer fellowship project was to compare the results from traditional toxicity studies with predictions from these alternative testing methods for food relevant chemicals in ToxCast. Her findings from this work will help scientists understand the utility of alternative toxicity testing methods when evaluating the safety of food-related chemicals. Upon successful completion of her doctoral degree, she plans to pursue a career as a Toxicologist. In this role, she plans to be the “voice” for individuals who come from small neighborhoods like mine by conducting toxicological and public health risk assessments to study the potential adverse effects that might result from human exposure to toxic substances.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Eva Vitucci
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees:
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Ms. Vitucci was very excited to receive this award. Exposure to air pollution is highly associated with increased cardiovascular mortalities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how an exposure in the lung can affect the unexposed, cardiovascular system need to be further studied. Her research focuses on elucidating how the effect of an exposure to air pollution in the lungs can be passed on to other cell types. Her ultimate goal is to understand non-autonomous signaling between cells, and tissues, and extend this knowledge to the development of molecular intervention strategies that can help mitigate the development of air pollution-induced cardiovascular disease. She was presented with this award for her preliminary studies where she shows that after an exposure to diesel exhaust particles, cell types beyond the airway epithelium are epigenetically altered and sensitized to further insults.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rui Xiong
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: US FDA/NCTR

Dr. Xiong felt honored to be selected as a recipient for the postdoctoral excellence award by the committee of the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section. Her training at FDA/NCTR focuses on development of human in vitro airway tissue model and its application in inhalation toxicity assessment. This award recognizes her research and greatly encourages her to pursue further on studies that will be informative and useful for regulatory agencies.

Her postdoctoral research focuses on toxicity assessment of tobacco smoke constituents such as acrolein using an in vitro human airway tissue model. Acrolein is a highly reactive respiratory irritant and present in high abundance in tobacco smoke. It has been extensively studied and implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, investigation of acrolein toxicity in in vitro systems could be very challenging because of its highly unstable and reactive chemical properties. The current study was designed to evaluate the mode of action (MOA) of acrolein toxicity in the ALI airway tissue model. She developed a novel in vitro strategy to mimic the inhalation bronchial epithelial exposure to acrolein experienced by smokers. A panel of respiratory diseases relevant toxicological endpoints was evaluated in ALI cultures and toxicity dose-response data was generated that could be used for conducting the in-vitro-in-vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). Her and her labmate's results demonstrate that ALI cultures can recapitulate the functional and structural alterations observed in acrolein-exposed animals, suggesting their potential application for studying tissue responses related to human respiratory diseases induced by cigarette smoke or its constituents (i.e. acrolein). Her long-term research interests involve the application of advanced in vitro human tissue models for toxicity assessment of xenobiotics including small-molecule drug candidates, tobacco smoke constituents as well as environmental toxins. The future goal of his research is to combine such advanced in vitro tissue models with computational modeling extrapolation strategies to make quantitative human risk assessments.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Rosa Chan
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California San Francisco

Ms. Chan is extremely honored to receive the RSESS award. The award will aid her to further continue her path as a successful researcher by offering her with opportunities to meet and network with other researchers during the SOT Annual Meeting and expand her scientific understanding to new areas.

Her thesis work at UCSF is focused on investigating the potential of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) as a methodology for evaluating toxicologic outcome of therapeutic agents. She believes that her work is innovative, will have important differentiating potential of drug induced liver injury (DILI) toxicology with respect to drugs. Moreover, the result of her work can be directly applied in the drug discovery process in order to aid the decision making of drug candidates and lowering the risk for drug hypersensitivity reactions such as DILI and Steven Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis. As a future scientist, she wants to continue extending her research background by investigating events that lead to drug toxicity reactions in either an industrial or academic setting. In particular, she wants to use her interdisciplinary approach and act as a bridge to ensure medication efficacy and safety, and mentor the next generation of scientists.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Esther Omaiye
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: MS, BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of California Riverside

Dr. Omaiye was very honored and pleased to receive the Specialty Section Student Travel Award which provided the financial support she needed to attend the 2017 SOT Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Getting recognition for her work is very rewarding and sharing the great news with her mentor brought more excitement. She looks forward to presenting her research at the meeting and network with a large audience of toxicology experts. As a young toxicologist, the opportunity to attend and participate in interesting events at the meetings contributes to achieving a successful research career in the long term.

As a graduate student researcher and trainee, her research is focused on investigating and evaluating the physical components of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the chemical compositions of the refill fluids using both analytical and in vitro approaches. E-cigarette products often contain inaccurately labeled nicotine concentrations and flavoring chemicals that are neither listed on the package nor intended for inhalation. She uses several cell types that model developmental stages and adult tissues to evaluate the toxicities of the refill fluids and flavor chemicals, and their potential lifelong effects on human health. She was the recipient of the award for a study that introduced a new issue in the emerging e-cigarette industry, the inclusion of nicotine in counterfeit products labeled 0 mg/mL and manufactured under a brandjacked label. While nicotine can alter brain function in adults and cause prenatal abnormalities, the chronic effects of inhaling aerosolized nicotine and uncharacterized flavoring chemicals on human health are not well understood. In their study, e-cigarettes refill fluids from four countries were investigated and analyzed to specifically; (1) determine the actual nicotine concentration in products labeled 0 mg/ml using high performance liquid chromatography, (2) identify counterfeit products using information and barcodes on the packaging, and (3) quantify flavor chemicals in replicate samples across countries using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Therir result showed that, although all products were labeled 0 mg/mL of nicotine, 17/125 contained nicotine (range = 0.4 – 20.4 mg/mL), and of the 17, 15 were purchased in one country and identified as counterfeit. The flavor chemicals present in both counterfeit and authentic refill fluids were often similar; however, the counterfeit products had additional chemicals that were absent in authentic products. With respect to the concentration of flavor chemicals, counterfeit products usually contained higher amounts (e.g. menthol was 5 times higher in one counterfeit product than its authentic counterpart). Chemicals in the range of 1.7 – 30 mg/mL included ethyl maltol, triacetin, corylone, benzyl alcohol, ethyl vanillin, furanol, and hexyl acetate. This e-cigarette related public health concern centers around the presence of mislabeled and substandard tobacco related products, and the unwitting exposure of users to potentially toxic products and chemicals. The project aimed at creating awareness and investigating an issue that could be addressed by agencies involved in the regulation of tobacco products. Their results argue for improvement in the accurate certification and regulation of products that contain nicotine and flavor chemicals. In the future, she will continue to work with e-cigarette products, looking at metal content, toxicity, and potential adverse health effects that may result from e-cigarette use.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Nikaeta Sadekar
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Research Institute for Fragrance Materials

Dr. Sadekar experienced a series of emotions when she first received news of being an award recipient. She was surprised, elated, and thankful for the support. This award helped her take full advantage of the annual meeting as she could stay for the duration of the conference. She was able to register for the CE course to learn about safety assessments, attend the round table sessions and engage in brainstorming discussions with the experts in the field. All of which has helped her improve her research project.

Her doctoral project focuses on the safety assessment of mercury based Ayurvedic medicine. Ayurveda is an ancient Indian medical system, which employs the use of herbal and mineral-based products for various medicinal uses. Ras Sindoor is an inorganic form of mercury, which is manufactured by utilizing a range of physicochemical processes. This formulation is used as an alleged therapeutic agent for urinary disorders, loss of strength, immune deficiency, inflammation and weakness of the heart. Such medicines are easily available for purchase over the Internet. Since Ayurvedic medicines are considered under the umbrella of ‘Dietary Supplements’, they are not under direct regulation by US FDA. This particular abstract (for which she received the award), investigates the effects of low-level long-term exposure of Ras Sindoor on kidney using biochemical and histopathological techniques. With the support provided by the SOT, she looks forward to establishing herself as a certified Toxicologist and continue being a part of this society with the aim to constantly learn of the advancements in the field and provide support to the budding Toxicologists.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Brett Winters
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mr. Winters was pleasantly surprised to hear he was awarded the RSESS travel award. The award enabled me to attend the SOT Annual Meeting for the first time, which was an amazing opportunity to learn about cutting edge research as well as to meet experts in the field.

His research focuses on the development of a novel method to screen volatile and insoluble chemicals for toxicity in vitro; something currently only conducted using animal models. We believe incorporating rapid metabolomic approaches to in vitro toxicity testing will enable for higher throughput toxicity testing of volatile and insoluble chemicals.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Jasmine Brown
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: US Environmental Protection Agency

Thousands of environmental compounds have not been characterized for their potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Due to the need for DNT hazard identification, efforts to develop alternative screening assays is a high priority. In an effort to address this issue, Ms. Brown's research focuses on developing a high-throughput in vitro method for screening compounds for DNT potential. This research evaluates the use of primary cortical neural cultures on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to screen compounds for DNT hazard. The MEA platform utilizes an electrophysiological approach to identifying compounds as having the potential to cause DNT by measuring the changes in neural function of treated primary cortical cultures. Specifically, she discusses further evaluation of a set of known DNT compounds as well as compounds that show no evidence of DNT in vivo using the MEA platform discussed earlier. Near future goals include analyzing this content rich data to provide us with more information on how “hits” would be determined in this assay. Eventually, she and her colleagues hope to implement this method as an initial screen allowing for prioritization of these compounds for further testing, and providing support for regulatory decision making.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Brittany Weldon
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: BS
Institution/Affiliation: University of Washington School of Public Health

Ms. Weldon's research focuses on assessing the risk of adverse health effects from exposure to silver nanoparticles by various exposure routes. Additionally, her research investigates the potential for silver nanoparticles to interact with sensitive organ systems such as the developing central nervous system and reproductive system. This award will help her continue in these endeavors and with the broader goals of applying toxicological sciences to improve human and environmental health.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Dana Lauterstein
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BA, MS
Institution/Affiliation: New York University

Dana Lauterstein is a graduate student at New York University and received the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section Student Award for her work entitled, "E-cigarettes— A Global Challenge: Imprinting the Central Nervous System of the Next Generation." Her research will impact SOT's vision of creating a safer and healthier world by advancing the science of toxicology through investigation of a controversial product whose safety is not yet known. The emergence of e-cigarettes into the global market, and their rising popularity among the public, especially in adolescents, is a growing public health concern. Presently, there is a limited amount of toxicity data concerning e-cigarettes and they are unregulated by the FDA in the U.S., unless specifically marked for therapeutic purposes. E-cigarettes could have the potential to be used as a cessation or alternative product for traditional cigarette smokers, blurring whether they should be classified as medicinal or tobacco products, and how they should be regulated. The use of e-cigarettes during early life stages may pose a significant risk to the developing central nervous system, and this project sought examine potential adverse outcomes associated with exposure to these products throughout gestation and lactation. Furthermore, this project addresses the emerging need for studies examining early life exposure to environmental toxicants and later adult disease. Maternal and adolescent use of conventional cigarettes has been correlated with adverse neurological outcomes, and studies have demonstrated that tobacco smoke can alter both the genome and the epigenome. However, prior to this study there was virtually no data on gene expression concerning e-cigarette products. Looking at genomic effects resulting from toxicant exposures can help to delineate pathways that are altered or damaged, and be an important stepping-stone in determining the safety of a toxicant, such as e-cigarettes. The data obtained in this project helps to start filling a large gap in the toxicological assessment of the safety of e-cigarettes regarding vulnerable the population discussed here.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Kpobari Nkpaa
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BSc, MSc
Institution/Affiliation: University of Port Harcourt

Kpobari Nkpaa is a Graduate Student at University of Port Harcourt and received the Regulatory and Safety Evlauation Specialty Section Student Award for his work entitled, “Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals for Population via Consumption of Seafood from Ogoniland, Rivers State, Nigeria; a case study of kaa, B-Dere and Bodo City.” He found that people that consume seafood contaminated by crude oil on a regular basis have a higher probability of developing adverse health effect over a period of time. While still a young scientist in the field of environmental toxicology, he would like to help develop new scientific concept that will eliminate uncertainties and other confounding issues that may invalidate scientific findings in the field of Toxicology.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Linda Schenk
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: MSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Karolinska Institutet

Linda Schenk is a postdoctoral scholar at Karolinska Institutet and received the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section Award for her work entitled, "REACH registrants fail to use available dermal uptake data in their derivation of dermal DNELs." In the present work her team investigated whether registrants under REACH have derived dermal DNELs or DMELs for substances that may be taken up via the skin in significant amounts. Further they studied if registrants made use of the available scientifically published dermal uptake data, and whether there is a selection bias towards choosing data that would increase the level of the dermal DNEL or DMEL. the findings were that the absence of dermal DNELs or DMELs many times were not consistent with the described uses of the substance. Furthermore, registrants frequently failed to use scientifically published data on dermal uptake. As the reported dermal uptake rates differ by orders of magnitude between studies choice of key study has a huge impact on the dermal DNEL. However, there was no clear trend in direction or magnitude of differences in cited absorption between registrants’ data (published or unpublished) and the data compiled by her team. This study highlights both the need for better use of available scientific studies in DNEL-derivation and the difficulty of determining an external exposure limit for the dermal route as uptake.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Joey Stevens
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: BS, BA
Institution/Affiliation: US Environmental Protection Agency

Joey Stevens is a graduate student with the US Environmental Protection Agency and received the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Specialty Section Student Award for her work entitled, "A Simplified and Rapid Screening Assay Using Zebrafish to Assess Cardiac Effects of Air Pollution-derived Particulate Matter." Particles in the air as a result of air pollution exact a substantial health burden. These particles have been linked specifically to adverse cardiovascular effects in humans after inhalation. As no two air sheds are alike, there are an enormous number of air pollution mixtures that need to be assessed, and current methods are unable to keep up. Her work is aimed at creating a quick and widely available screen to determine components of air pollution mixtures that cause cardiovascular effects in zebrafish as a predictive model of human response. This will help us to prioritize highly potent components for more targeted testing.

Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award Fund

Recipient: Merrie Mosedale
Award Year: 2013
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: The Hamner Institutes
Merrie Mosedale is a postdoctoral fellow of the Hamner Institutes and she received the Regulatory and Safety Evaluation Student Award for her work entitled, “Safety Assessment of a Novel Antibiotic Using a Mouse Population-Based Approach Predicts Risks of DILI in Humans where Classical Models Fail.” Her work involved a unique partnership between academia and the pharmaceutical industry in which she and her colleagues describe the use of an inbred, laboratory mouse diversity panel to effectively predict the livery injury liability of a new drug candidate in clinical trials where classical rodent models have failed. The work she conducted highlights the potential for population-based approaches to improve human risk assessment in drug-safety testing. The award allowed her to share her research with other scientists in the field. She hopes to advance toxicology in the 21st century by exploring the potential for novel animal and in vitro models to predict and understand adverse drug reactions in human populations.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Lillie Marie Barnett
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: BS, BA
Institution/Affiliation: University of Georgia

Ms. Barnett was delighted to receive the Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award. This will enable her to attend NIH FAES training workshops, as well as the Gordon Conference on Molecular Toxicology, which will both strengthen the skills that she applies to her dissertation project as well as her future research.

Ms. Barnett's research focuses on the in vitro mechanisms by which brominated flame retardants (BFRs) cause toxicity to the kidney. Specifically, she is exploring this from two angles: First studying the epigenetic mechanisms by which BFRs cause cell death in tubular epithelial cells and second by exploring how these BFR-exposed tubular cells impact neighboring kidney fibroblasts to potentially contribute to toxicant-induced kidney fibrosis. Upon completing her PhD, Ms. Barnett hopes to become a project manager for the EPA, CDC, or other government organization that conducts toxicology research. Ultimately, she hopes to effectively design research projects that answer the latest mechanistic toxicology questions that are relevant to preserving the health of our public.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Joseph Jilek
Award Year: 2020
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Dr. Jilek is honored to receive this award from the Mechanisms Specialty Section - this specialty section is home to a very impressive list of scientists and he finds it very exciting to be honored within this group. Specifically, receiving the Renal Toxicology award is a fantastic boost of momentum for his research project.

Dr. Jilek's research aims to understand how nonalcoholic steatohepatitis affects kidney function. Specifically, he is interested in how these changes affect clearance of drugs/toxicants via the kidney. This specific project evaluated how clearance of cisplatin, a drug known to be toxic to the kidney, is reduced in a rat model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Subsequently, he found that this coincides with reduced kidney toxicity.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Tarana Arman
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: ME
Institution/Affiliation: Washington State University, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Receiving this award from SOT was a very humbling and special moment for Ms. Arman. She felt very fortunate that her abstract and research summary could highlight the importance of her research work. This was her second year at the SOT annual meeting and she feels it always gives her the opportunity to listen to and learn about other interesting research on-going in the field of toxicology. This award helped her by boosting her confidence to participate in more events. Every time she is involved in an event like this, her understanding of her research grows deeper. This monetary award will help her take part in the next conference.

Ms. Arman has always enjoyed sharing her knowledge with her coworkers for better ideas, which ultimately strengthens her knowledge bank. Her ultimate career goal is to become an expert in the fields of liver and kidney molecular toxicology to better predict and mitigate these toxicities. The overall premise of her research work is to elucidate the mechanisms of microcystin-LR (MCLR) toxicity in populations with preexisting liver and kidney diseases. The preexisting disease condition that she is looking into is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the United States, with almost 40% of the population suffering from it. NAFLD is defined as the accumulation of excessive fat in the liver of patients, without a history of excessive alcohol intake. If unchecked, a fatty liver progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). An estimated 17% of the US adult population have NASH. Evidence suggests that exposure to environmental toxicants can cause fatty liver and/or drive NAFLD progression to NASH (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE)). In addition to NAFLD, chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a significant health burden and shares some of the similar risk factors associated with NAFLD. A meta-analysis report reported a two-fold increase in CKD in association with NASH. Similar to what is known regarding the role of toxicants in NAFLD progression, some environmental factors have been implicated in kidney toxicity (e.g. bisphenol A). For both NAFLD and CKD, there is more research needed into the role of other environmental toxins play in the severity and progression of these diseases. Microcystin-LR (MCLR), is an extremely stable and persistent toxin produced by the cyanobacteria blooms (blue-green algae). These blooms are ubiquitous in surface water and thrive under favorable conditions. Liver and kidney are the primary and secondary target organs affected by MCLR. Her research focuses on investigating the role of MCLR in the progression of NAFLD and CKD. For her presentation at PANWAT 2018, she discussed about the mechanistic link(s) between MCLR kidney toxicity and the development and progression of CKD in the context of NASH.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Yu-Wei Chang
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University

Dr. Chang was so excited and felt so grateful to receive this award. This is the second time that her research was selected for Renal Toxicology Award. She was really honored to get the recognition from the experts in nephrology and toxicology. She would like to thank Mechanisms Specialty Section for this glory. The results of her study confirmed the toxicity of nicotine exposure in kidney. This award can further strength the importance of her research, which can help on the regulation of nicotine-containing products such as e-cigarette.

Dr. Chang's research suggests that long-term and chronic exposure to pure nicotine can induce the specific characteristics associated with cancer development in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Moreover, she also found the potential therapeutic option (antioxidant) to decrease the adverse effects of nicotine in kidney. The findings of her study provide the evidence on the role and mechanisms of nicotine exposure in kidney cancer development. This study also provided a hint that the level of intracellular oxidative stress plays an important role during nicotine-induced carcinogenesis. The next step of her research will focus on the source of nicotine-induced oxidative stress in cells, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying. Hopefully she can provide a clear evidence on the role of nicotine in the imbalance of intracellular oxidative stress.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Yu-Syuan Luo
Award Year: 2019
Current Degrees: MS, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Dr. Luo was thrilled and surprised upon receiving this award. This award recognizes his work on investigating the relationship between glutathione conjugation metabolites and kidney toxicity of tetrachloroethylene in Collaborative Cross mouse population. With this accomplishment, if possible, he would like to apply his knowledge and skill set to further explore the chemical-induced nephrotoxicity by using alternative approaches (in vitro or in silico). He was really grateful that he could receive this great honor from the Society of Toxicology.

Dr. Luo's research focuses on characterizing the population variability in metabolism and toxicity of environmental toxicants, by using a population-based mouse model. In their study, they aimed to fill two critical data gaps in health risk assessment and kidney toxicity of tetrachloroethylene. First, most of time, there is a lack of experimental data for characterizing the population variability in metabolism and toxicity of toxicants in traditional health risk assessment. Alternatively, a default uncertainty factor of 10 is used to accounting for the inter-individual variability. In their study, they used the Collaborative Cross mouse population to derive the chemical-specific uncertainty factors, which further refined the health risk assessment of tetrachloroethylene. Second, the metabolism-toxicity relationship between glutathione conjugation metabolites and kidney toxicity of tetrachloroethylene has been challenged because of the relatively small metabolic flux through glutathione conjugation pathway as compared to the oxidative metabolism. Herein, they consolidated the relationship between glutathione conjugation metabolites and kidney toxicity of tetrachloroethylene by using a population-based correlation analysis. This result provides a strong evidence for the mode of action (MOA) of glutathione metabolites-induced kidney toxicity. Collectively, their work advances the understanding in metabolism and kidney toxicity of tetrachloroethylene, as well as future health risk assessment of tetrachloroethylene. In the future, Dr. Luo would like to investigate the organ-specific toxicity of environmental chemicals by using the alternative approaches (e.g., in vitro or in silico). The other research area that he is interested in is to using the applied toxicology to characterize the population variability for the refinement of health risk assessment.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Firas Alhasson
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of South Carolina

When he got an email from SOT saying he was a recipient, Dr. Alhasson celebrated with his lab mates. This award means a lot to him because he has worked for almost five years on the kidney and now he received an award in the kidney field. As a researcher in molecular toxicology, he wished to expand his research interests in the environment exposure-induced disease pathology following completion of his PhD. He also aims to further contribute to the goals of the Society of Toxicology in years to come.

His current project is to investigate the mechanistic pathway of renal inflammation and mesangial cells activation following environmental exposures. He and his colleagues hypothesized that Microcystin causes mesangial cells activation which relied on P47phox leading to a NOX-2 mediated miRNA21 increase in kidney in NAFLD condition. Using both in vivo and in vitro approaches, they aimed to unravel the molecular signatures in kidney pathology of NAFLD

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: YuWei Chang
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: BS, MS
Institution/Affiliation: Texas Tech University

Ms. Chang was delighted and thrilled when receiving the notification of this award. This award was a great encouragement and brings her the faith to keep doing on what’s needed in her research. She would like to thank the Mechanisms Specialty Section for giving her this honor. She is looking forward to harvesting the novel findings of her study and to presenting it in the further meeting.

Her research is focused on the chronic toxicological effects of arsenic in kidney associated chronic kidney diseases by using in vitro cell model. As far as she knew, multiple epidemiological studies have indicated that arsenic can increase the risk of chronic kidney disease, however, the comprehensive analysis of mechanisms is still unclear. Nevertheless, there is no predictive molecular biomarker for early detection of kidney fibrosis, which is an essential step on the progression of chronic kidney disease. The findings of her study suggest that the acute exposure to arsenic can cause decreased growth of kidney tubular epithelial cells related to acute kidney injury. The long-term exposure to arsenic, however, results in renal fibrogenesis, which can be inhibited by treatment with epigenetic based therapeutics. The results of her study provide the potential mechanism on the adverse effect of arsenic exposure in kidney. In the future, the biomarkers and signaling pathways associated with arsenic-induced renal fibrosis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential therapy for kidney fibrosis will also need to be investigated.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Maria Beatriz Monteiro
Award Year: 2018
Current Degrees: MSc, PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School

Dr. Monteiro is truly honored to be the recipient of The Renal Toxicology Endowment Fund Award administered by the Mechanisms Specialty Section. She started her research on kidney disease during graduate school and since then she has experienced the difficulties of working in this field which sometimes does not get the necessary attention, funding, or concern. This unexpected recognition of her efforts gives her a sense of security and confidence to continue working on the kidney disease, hopefully contributing for a better future for the patients.

Acute kidney injury is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for this type of injury and the kidney’s mechanisms of repair are not completely understood. Her research had identified ID-8 as a novel compound that stimulates the proliferation of kidney cells after acute injury. Further studies in vivo may provide more evidence for the therapeutic use of ID-8 to treat acute kidney injury.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Qian Lin
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: University of Louisville
Dr. Lin was very surprised when she received the award. She felt really appreciative of her mentor. She was so happy to get this award and feels confidence in her project. She felt that only a very interesting project would gain the attentions from other scientists. It makes her feel motivated to do more to further studies in her field. She is a PhD student in UofL, and is working on diabetes. She is interested in doing research in diabetes. To explore promising drugs and to discover the deep mechanisms of how drugs work on diabetes is meaningful to our society. Her goal is to join a group which is working on drug discovery in diabetes. After the graduation, she would like to find a Postdoc position to learn more about diabetes. To her present project on diabetic nephropathy, which part of kidney is really affected by the FGF1 and which targets of FGF1 is working on should be further studied. She would like to continue exploring this field in the future.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka Trivedi
Award Year: 2017
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Dr. Trivedi was really excited and pleased when she received this award. She immediately shared the good news with her advisor and also thanked him for all his support and encouragement. This award will provide recognition to her work and complement her research in the field of renal toxicology. She will use this award as a springboard for her career in which she plans to make important contributions to advancing our understanding of toxicology research. Her research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. In order to identify druggable targets, she and her team performed RNA sequencing in mouse model of toxic kidney fibrosis and identified Phospholipase D4 (PLD4), a single pass transmembrane glycoprotein, as one of the highly up-regulated genes. Up-regulation of PLD4 was confirmed in three mechanistically distinct mouse models as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Mechanistically, they show that PLD4 facilitates fibrogenesis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses thereby promoting a TGF-ß signaling pathway. Moreover, PLD4 induced the expression of a1-antitrypsin protein (a serine protease inhibitor) that resulted in subsequent down-regulation of a protease neutrophil elastase (NE) expression, thereby leading to the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins. Interestingly, therapeutic targeting of PLD4 using specific siRNA also protected the mice from kidney fibrosis by inhibiting TGF-ß signaling and inducing NE expression. In conclusion, their findings identified PLD4 as a novel therapeutic target for kidney fibrosis - an unmet medical need. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the toxicological science, which can be directly applied clinically to benefit the society.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Ramya Kolli
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: MS
Institution/Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program
Ozonation is used for the disinfection of drinking water and one of its major byproducts is bromate. Bromate is a possible human carcinogen whose mechanism of action is not totally understood. Ms. Kolli and her colleagues study the effects of bromate on one of the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21, which is protective against various nephrotoxic effects. However it is also hypothesized to drive carcinogenesis via its ability to inhibit apoptosis. They previously showed that bromate increased p21 expression in renal cells in vitro. She and her colleagues hypothesize that this occurs via epigenetic mechanisms. To test this hypothesis we analyzed DNA methylation and histone acetylation using high-throughput techniques like next-generation sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, respectively. Understanding the effects of bromate on DNA methylation and histone acetylation of p21 would bridge the gaps-in-knowledge about the mechanisms of bromate-induced nephrotoxicity. This knowledge would further facilitate understanding the carcinogenic effects of bromate and mechanisms of action of other disinfection byproducts.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Mira Pavkovic
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School - LSP
Drug-induced kidney injury is frequently encountered in hospitalized patients, but routinely used markers are insensitive and nonspecific. Dr. Pavkovic is evaluating a small class of RNAs, microRNAs, in urine as new biomarkers for this type of kidney injury. For the evaluation she is using urine samples from two cohorts of patients with acetaminophen- or cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Our results indicate that three specific microRNAs (miR-21, -200c and -423) in combination with the known protein biomarker KIM-1 could be non-invasive as well as specific biomarkers for the detection of drug-induced kidney injury in patients. Based on the kidney expression and target analysis of the three microRNAs they could add information about the affected molecular pathways in the injured kidney.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Priyanka  Trivedi
Award Year: 2016
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Dr. Trivedi's research focuses on discovering therapeutic targets for acute and chronic kidney diseases. Kidney fibrosis, the hallmark of the chronic kidney disease (CKD), is an irreversible process leading to life-threatening end-stage renal failure. Unfortunately, no effective therapeutic strategies are available to cure this condition. This is due to lack of our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis. Using RNA sequencing, we identified phospholipase D4 (PLD4) as one of the targets for the treatment of kidney fibrosis. Her research deciphers a mechanistic role of PLD4 in the regulation of fibrosis. She and her colleagues observed that PLD4 was significantly increased in mechanistically different mouse models of kidney fibrosis as well as in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. Further, they found that PLD4 knockout mice (PLD4-/-) showed less fibrosis compared to the wild type (PLD4+/+) mice after folic acid injection- as well as unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney fibrosis. This was attributed to mainly two reasons, (i) PLD4-/- mice had increased level of anti-fibrotic cytokines compared to the PLD4+/+ mice and, (ii) sustained activation of the proteases, due to decreased level of serpina1 (a protease inhibitor) in PLD4-/- mice, led to an efficient degradation of collagen rescuing these mice from scar tissue formation in the kidney. Thus they identified that PLD4 is a central target that can be intervened in preventing fibrosis-associated organ dysfunction. Her future goal is to continue contributing to the mechanistic toxicological sciences, which can be translated clinically.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Blessy George
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PharmD
Institution/Affiliation: Rutgers University
Blessy George is a graduate student at Rutgers University and received the Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award for her work entitled, "Urinary KIM-1 Detection of Subclinical Nephrotoxicity in Oncology Patients Treated with Cisplatin." Her research examined acute kidney injury induced by a chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin. Cisplatin causes nephrotoxicity in about one-third of the patients that receive the agent. It is also a dose-limiting side effect in an otherwise effective medication. Cisplatin continues to be a mainstay in solid-tumor regimens; therefore ways to monitor and limit its nephrotoxic potential is essential. In her study she and her team examined several novel biomarkers that show potential to be highly sensitive to subclinical acute kidney injury. Preliminary data shows that several novel biomarkers including kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) are elevated 10 days after cisplatin infusion compared to baseline in the absence of serum creatinine elevations. One way in which we can create a safer world is by identifying and preventing danger before it occurs. Current methods of detecting kidney injury are not the safest or most effective especially in the face of growing pre-clinical evidence. her research focuses on ideally detecting kidney toxicity closest to the point of injury and to understand the degree of injury at earlier time points.

Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award Fund

Recipient: Susanne Ramm
Award Year: 2015
Current Degrees: PhD
Institution/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Susanne Ramm is a postdoctoral scholar at Harvard Medical School and received the Renal Toxicology Fellowship Award for her work entitled, "Live cell high-content imaging to mechanistically classify kidney toxicity." Her research aims at developing new methodologies that will allow us to predict which chemicals and drugs are the most likely culprits as nephrotoxicants. Using their technique, cells obtained from human kidneys are grown in a dish and then exposed to a wide range of drugs – many of which are known to cause kidney damage. Using new, state-of-the-art microscopy techniques, they are able to image several different biological processes taking place in these living cells in response to the drugs within 24 hours. To date, their data suggests that visualizing these processes in kidney cells may not only provide a very powerful way of predicting which drugs are likely to cause kidney injury but also gain knowledge on how exactly they damage the cells. Additionally, instead of focusing on probing for known toxicity patterns, they are using techniques that will allow for interrogation of broad phenot